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    (Original post by Aniaa)
    I may go to study in one of them. And I didnt say this school was bad because it looks like ugly, learn to read
    It's still out of order to claim uk trained doctors are the worst in Europe. You haven't even provided evidence for it :rolleyes:

    And it doesn't make sense to come here to study if you think uk is bad for training medicine. You might as well not have bothered applying and staying in Poland....
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    (Original post by FlavaFavourFruit)
    It's still out of order to claim uk trained doctors are the worst in Europe. You haven't even provided evidence for it :rolleyes:

    And it doesn't make sense to come here to study if you think uk is bad for training medicine. You might as well not have bothered applying and staying in Poland....
    yeah I might but anyway Im pretty sure UK will reject me so.
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    Q. Female infertility treatment is expensive, has a very low success rate and is even less successful in smokers. To whom do you think it should be available?

    My answer: It is important to be non-judgemental and treat all patients equally following the justice ethical principle. But it is important when choosing who to give the treatment to, to think about who needs it the most and who would benefit from it the most. Perhaps a patient who has had no children would need it more than a patient that has had some children because the patient who has had no children may be suffering more psychologically. It is also important to think about the child who is going to be born, from which parent would it have a better quality of life. It would be important to think about the environment, social , economic background of the patient and the support the baby would have in growing up. It is important to maximise the chances of success of the treatment, therefore making sure NHS money is used efficiently. Therefore it would be appropriate to provide the treatment to non-smokers first and perhaps the young who have greater chance of success of the treatment if the treatment is surgery. It is also important to think about the medicines the patient is currently on in case the treatment requires medicines which would interrupt with the medicines being used.
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    Hey guys i hope you can help me :^_^:
    I learned a lot from my work experience, however I have also observed some interesting things about doctors and other health professionals from the view point of a patient.
    I was wondering if it's okay to talk about this stuff in my interview even though its not through shadowing/work experience?

    I wish you all goodluck with your interviews!
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    A question on Jehovah's Witness and blood transfusion. I understand this question may have been asked before but just to clarify; If a child (U-16) requires blood transfusion in order to survive, the doctors need to seek the best interest of the person. In order to find out the best interest for the patient. So common sense would suggest giving the transfusion since it'll save his life. But I read this on the BMA ethical toolkit: Factors that need to be taken into account when making a best interests test include the following:
    The extent of the incapacitated person’s ability to participate in the decision
    • The likelihood that the person will regain capacity in sufficient time to be able to decide personally
    • The person’s past and present wishes and feelings
    • His or her beliefs or values where they would be relevant to the decision
    • The benefits and burdens of the decision


    So if the believes of the child is as such that their religion doesn't permit transfusion of the blood, (as it's what they would have wanted if they were unconscience) then how would you go about dealing with this? Just leave them, or try and persuade the parent/s, and what if their choice was to dismiss the transfusion?
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    A question on Jehovah's Witness and blood transfusion. I understand this question may have been asked before but just to clarify; If a child (U-16) requires blood transfusion in order to survive, the doctors need to seek the best interest of the person. In order to find out the best interest for the patient. So common sense would suggest giving the transfusion since it'll save his life. But I read this on the BMA ethical toolkit: Factors that need to be taken into account when making a best interests test include the following:
    The extent of the incapacitated person’s ability to participate in the decision
    • The likelihood that the person will regain capacity in sufficient time to be able to decide personally
    • The person’s past and present wishes and feelings
    • His or her beliefs or values where they would be relevant to the decision
    • The benefits and burdens of the decision


    So if the believes of the child is as such that their religion doesn't permit transfusion of the blood, (as it's what they would have wanted if they were unconscience) then how would you go about dealing with this? Just leave them, or try and persuade the parent/s, and what if their choice was to dismiss the transfusion?
    ok, well as you have said when you need to determine the patients best interests yeah you would look at their own religious beliefs.

    HOWEVER you cannot assume that their beliefs wont change when dealing with death. You also cant assume that the patient follows their religion strictly. It depends on the urgency of the matter, if you feel that the risks being presented to the patient are quite serious then act in the patients best interests - provide the transfusion IF you are confident that you can explain your reasons.

    Definitely involve the parents, again they may change their mind. If not then really the answer is that it depends. The scenario is complex and it would be advisable to have a multidisciplinary approach.

    If anyone has any other questions please ask
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    (Original post by purple and gold)
    ok, well as you have said when you need to determine the patients best interests yeah you would look at their own religious beliefs.

    HOWEVER you cannot assume that their beliefs wont change when dealing with death. You also cant assume that the patient follows their religion strictly. It depends on the urgency of the matter, if you feel that the risks being presented to the patient are quite serious then act in the patients best interests - provide the transfusion IF you are confident that you can explain your reasons.

    Definitely involve the parents, again they may change their mind. If not then really the answer is that it depends. The scenario is complex and it would be advisable to have a multidisciplinary approach.

    If anyone has any other questions please ask
    But what if the parents decline? So would we follow their decisions? And how would this change if the patient was over 16? Don't they have their own autonomy?
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    A question on Jehovah's Witness and blood transfusion. I understand this question may have been asked before but just to clarify; If a child (U-16) requires blood transfusion in order to survive, the doctors need to seek the best interest of the person. In order to find out the best interest for the patient. So common sense would suggest giving the transfusion since it'll save his life. But I read this on the BMA ethical toolkit: Factors that need to be taken into account when making a best interests test include the following:
    The extent of the incapacitated person’s ability to participate in the decision
    • The likelihood that the person will regain capacity in sufficient time to be able to decide personally
    • The person’s past and present wishes and feelings
    • His or her beliefs or values where they would be relevant to the decision
    • The benefits and burdens of the decision


    So if the believes of the child is as such that their religion doesn't permit transfusion of the blood, (as it's what they would have wanted if they were unconscience) then how would you go about dealing with this? Just leave them, or try and persuade the parent/s, and what if their choice was to dismiss the transfusion?
    You can't just assume the child is an orthodox Jehovah's Witness, they might not follow some aspects of the religion as seriously. If time was of the essence, you'd have to just give the transfusion as this correlates to the two principles of beneficence and non-maleficence- imagine you assumed the child didn't want the transplant and they died, would be so much worse. You'd have to involve senior colleagues/the hospital's legal team at as early a stage as possible. If the relatives are speaking for the child and refusing the transfusion, I'd try speak to them about it as sensitively as possible, but probably convincing them to change their mind is futile and possibly insulting, they've practised their religion for a while and obviously take it very seriously that they're willing to accept their child's possible death, one conversation with a doctor is hardly going to convince them otherwise. I'd have to consider any alternatives- is a blood transplant the only option? I'd obviously seek advice from colleagues, however, ultimately, I would have to act in the child's best interests- he may not share his parents' views. I'd try be as understanding to the parents as possible, explaining that I was really just trying to do what I, and my colleagues, thought was best to do for their child. I'd also let them know that if they do strongly disagree with this decision, then they are within their rights to pursue the situation further (knowing you've simply acted in your patients best interests, spoken in-depth with your colleagues, and can justify your decision, you have nothing to fear in a courtroom.)
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    But what if the parents decline? So would we follow their decisions? And how would this change if the patient was over 16? Don't they have their own autonomy?
    I THINK, if the treatment is life-saving and the child expresses a wish to go through with it despite their parents' objection, you go ahead with the transfusion.
    And I don't think over 16's need parental permission - they can consent to treatment on their own.


    Please correct me if I'm wrong!!
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    (Original post by Kaikokylie)
    Hey guys i hope you can help me :^_^:
    I learned a lot from my work experience, however I have also observed some interesting things about doctors and other health professionals from the view point of a patient.
    I was wondering if it's okay to talk about this stuff in my interview even though its not through shadowing/work experience?

    I wish you all goodluck with your interviews!
    I don't see why mentioning what you learnt about Medicine from the patient's point of view would be a bad thing! But I wouldn't focus your answers around it. Wherever possible I would first talk about what I learnt through my work exp/volunteering, if possible. After that maybe you could throw in something you learnt from the patient's point of view?
    This is just my opinion
    Good luck with your interviews too!
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    But what if the parents decline? So would we follow their decisions? And how would this change if the patient was over 16? Don't they have their own autonomy?
    well, I think that you would have to act in the best interests of the patient which is administer the blood transfusion. You would have to deal with the parents and as said above yeah one conversation with them wont change their mind, it would be quite insulting in order to make them change their mind.

    if the patient was over 16, again you would assess their capacity to make a decision. if they are incompetent administer the transfusion.

    If they are competent, explain the treatment, side effects and consequences of the transfusion. If the patient still refuses then you have to respect their autonomy and accept their choice.
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    But what if the parents decline? So would we follow their decisions? And how would this change if the patient was over 16? Don't they have their own autonomy?
    Do you own the ISC medical book by any chance?
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    (Original post by rc16)
    You can't just assume the child is an orthodox Jehovah's Witness, they might not follow some aspects of the religion as seriously. If time was of the essence, you'd have to just give the transfusion as this correlates to the two principles of beneficence and non-maleficence- imagine you assumed the child didn't want the transplant and they died, would be so much worse. You'd have to involve senior colleagues/the hospital's legal team at as early a stage as possible. If the relatives are speaking for the child and refusing the transfusion, I'd try speak to them about it as sensitively as possible, but probably convincing them to change their mind is futile and possibly insulting, they've practised their religion for a while and obviously take it very seriously that they're willing to accept their child's possible death, one conversation with a doctor is hardly going to convince them otherwise. I'd have to consider any alternatives- is a blood transplant the only option? I'd obviously seek advice from colleagues, however, ultimately, I would have to act in the child's best interests- he may not share his parents' views. I'd try be as understanding to the parents as possible, explaining that I was really just trying to do what I, and my colleagues, thought was best to do for their child. I'd also let them know that if they do strongly disagree with this decision, then they are within their rights to pursue the situation further (knowing you've simply acted in your patients best interests, spoken in-depth with your colleagues, and can justify your decision, you have nothing to fear in a courtroom.)
    (Original post by lovelycup7)
    I don't see why mentioning what you learnt about Medicine from the patient's point of view would be a bad thing! But I wouldn't focus your answers around it. Wherever possible I would first talk about what I learnt through my work exp/volunteering, if possible. After that maybe you could throw in something you learnt from the patient's point of view?
    This is just my opinion
    Good luck with your interviews too!
    (Original post by purple and gold)
    well, I think that you would have to act in the best interests of the patient which is administer the blood transfusion. You would have to deal with the parents and as said above yeah one conversation with them wont change their mind, it would be quite insulting in order to make them change their mind.

    if the patient was over 16, again you would assess their capacity to make a decision. if they are incompetent administer the transfusion.

    If they are competent, explain the treatment, side effects and consequences of the transfusion. If the patient still refuses then you have to respect their autonomy and accept their choice.
    Yes thank you.. that does clear things up!
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    (Original post by FlavaFavourFruit)
    Do you own the ISC medical book by any chance?
    Yes, but it's the first edition, I loaned it from the library, any updates, I just follow up from the thread.
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    Okay, another question on what to wear on your interview!
    Which shirt is the most appropriate? Does a white shirt with faint lines look professional, or do they have to be plain? What about the colour? Does it have to be white or any other light colour like light blue?
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    Okay, another question on what to wear on your interview!
    Which shirt is the most appropriate? Does a white shirt with faint lines look professional, or do they have to be plain? What about the colour? Does it have to be white or any other light colour like light blue?
    Doesn't matter.

    Although the guys in my year seem to have a penchant for wearing light blue :dontknow:
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    (Original post by TattyBoJangles)
    Doesn't matter.

    Although the guys in my year seem to have a penchant for wearing light blue :dontknow:
    Fair enough thanks. What about a tie?
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    Fair enough thanks. What about a tie?
    If I'm thinking back to my interviews, I think most wore a tie. Well, most were in full suits.

    Whether or not it matters, I don't know. It's better to look and feel good in what you're wearing than feeling (or looking) like you've borrowed your dad's suit
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    Fair enough thanks. What about a tie?
    haha! Lol I think you've filled up the last few pages of the thread with questions about this that and the other I can just picture you asking questions at your interview rather than answering them - I think you'd make a good interviewer tho, some cracking questions on this thread by you

    Just go with what you're comfortable with. Tie or no tie I've seen some students with and without ties at their interviews. Good luck with your interview
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    (Original post by TattyBoJangles)
    If I'm thinking back to my interviews, I think most wore a tie. Well, most were in full suits.

    Whether or not it matters, I don't know. It's better to look and feel good in what you're wearing than feeling (or looking) like you've borrowed your dad's suit
    Haha no sorry I meant the colour of the tie! I will be wearing one, but do they prefer a more darker and simple one?
 
 
 
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