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    (Original post by foxie)
    About class management, lecturer saying I should only tactically ignore if minor and to build a good class environment might take 3 weeks and I need to reinforce the rules. The sm is saying I should carry on with the objectives...! I should keep delivering the lesson even if noisy. I think the lecturer is right, but I am being pressured by delivering what I have planned.
    I definitely agree with the lecturer. Class environment comes before EVERYTHING else. Ignore little things, praise everything you want to see in their behaviour and don't teach until it's quiet and you have everyone's attention.

    Have a number of ways of getting quiet - I use one finger in the air, counting down from ten, just standing totally silently and waiting (requires steely determination not to say anything but just look at them like you want them to listen), I put on a clock and time how long they take to get quiet. If they beat their time then they get a reward (I have a jar of marbles that we fill up and when it's full they get a prize). Sometimes I show a quiet picture on the board, I sometimes write on the board they need to be quiet, I have red, amber and green noise levels so I set it on green and point and wait...some people might think this is too many methods, but they will quickly notice and take the piss out of you if you only have one and it will have 0 effect.
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    Has anyone tried yellow and red warning cards, like the give in football, to help with class management?
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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    Has anyone tried yellow and red warning cards, like the give in football, to help with class management?
    I've tried a 'noise wheel' its basically a big sheet for paper with a red circle which says '100% silence' a amber circle which says 'whispers' and a green circle witch says 'talk in a normal voice'. Depending on the activity, I move the arrow to where I want it to be, for the volume of noise. It worked with year 7, have yet to try it with other years.

    For those struggling with volume and tone of voice ( which I am) my mentor advised me to videorecord a lesson. I did. I watched it back, I cringed to high heaven, it was excrutiating to watch, BUT, it was very very very very helpful, I can see almost exactly what they mean about voice now, because though in my head I thought I sounded stern, in reality, I really didn't.
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    (Original post by smartarse1983)
    I've tried a 'noise wheel' its basically a big sheet for paper with a red circle which says '100% silence' a amber circle which says 'whispers' and a green circle witch says 'talk in a normal voice'. Depending on the activity, I move the arrow to where I want it to be, for the volume of noise. It worked with year 7, have yet to try it with other years.

    For those struggling with volume and tone of voice ( which I am) my mentor advised me to videorecord a lesson. I did. I watched it back, I cringed to high heaven, it was excrutiating to watch, BUT, it was very very very very helpful, I can see almost exactly what they mean about voice now, because though in my head I thought I sounded stern, in reality, I really didn't.
    Yeah I got filmed while I was training. It was body language for me- I looked more closed off than I thought I did.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/i
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    I already feel more confident after my first lesson (Thursday) was a total disaster in my own eyes. I managed to pitch it to too high an ability, failed to really control the disruption and wasn't great basically. I'm so much more optimistic now that I've come up with a new seating plan and know exactly who was the trouble makers in my class. Don't be afraid to try new plans folks, they're so useful, just stick to them no matter what.
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    (Original post by robo donkey)
    I already feel more confident after my first lesson (Thursday) was a total disaster in my own eyes. I managed to pitch it to too high an ability, failed to really control the disruption and wasn't great basically. I'm so much more optimistic now that I've come up with a new seating plan and know exactly who was the trouble makers in my class. Don't be afraid to try new plans folks, they're so useful, just stick to them no matter what.
    My classroom has lecture type chairs that you can move around because the class isn't very big. I don't like it because some kids end up complaining so and so is kicking me. Yet if I put them in a circle they talk.
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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    Has anyone tried yellow and red warning cards, like the give in football, to help with class management?
    I'm in my NQT year and I do this.


    Yellow is the first warning. It signifies that their behaviour is disrupting learning. A yellow warning might be something like talking over my voice, shouting out, etc.

    A red warning is when they have been given the warning but they do it again. So a second instance of shouting out.

    After their two warnings I send them out, as they are not making any steps to try and modify their behaviour.


    Of course sometimes big instances like throwing something or swearing at another member of the class would mean being sent straight out but I find that yellow and red helps control the low level stuff.
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    (Original post by Suzanathema)
    I'm in my NQT year and I do this.


    Yellow is the first warning. It signifies that their behaviour is disrupting learning. A yellow warning might be something like talking over my voice, shouting out, etc.

    A red warning is when they have been given the warning but they do it again. So a second instance of shouting out.

    After their two warnings I send them out, as they are not making any steps to try and modify their behaviour.


    Of course sometimes big instances like throwing something or swearing at another member of the class would mean being sent straight out but I find that yellow and red helps control the low level stuff.
    Out of curiousity, when you send them out, where do you send them to? Also, what happens if you send more than one child out?
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    Out of curiousity, when you send them out, where do you send them to? Also, what happens if you send more than one child out?
    Different schools have different systems for this, so it's vital to find out what the arrangements are in your school.

    One school I worked in (as an agency cover supervisor) didn't have any official place to send them to (as far as I know) but members of staff tended to arrange within a department to send them to the HoD, or to work in silence in a corner of the staff workroom if someone was in there.

    One particularly rough school I worked in for a few days had a telephone on all teachers' desks so you could call for a 'House Manager' to come and collect pupils who had failed to improve their behaviour after 2 warnings. It was very efficient and regularly used. Another school had a similar system, but the culture of the school was such that teachers were blamed for sending kids out or using the behaviour system much, so tended to settle things within the department (ie: by sending pupils to the HoD) unless things got really bad.

    It's a mixed picture so you just have to find out what the school you're working in does.
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    Out of curiousity, when you send them out, where do you send them to? Also, what happens if you send more than one child out?
    It depends when it happens.

    Usually disruption in my lessons occurs when I am talking. I'm not some big talker, I do get the whole student-centred learning thing, but sometimes things need explaining and for that I expect silence. In that case, I make them wait outside until I'm done with the explanation and then go out to find somewhere for them to work.

    Usually it's a nearby classroom but if that would cause more disruption than it'd solve (like when all of of the challenging side of Y9 are being taught at the same time) I would park them in the HOD's office and send work out.


    I was doing this for a while with no actual improvements to classroom behaviour the following lesson so now being sent out means a phonecall home and an after school detention. It's slowly wearing them down.



    I can send as many out as I want. In fact, the more I send out the better as far as my mentor is concerned. If you put up with poor behaviour because of some judgement on how many students you're sending out, to me that suggests standards are being lowered. Keep them high, send half the class out if they are stopping the other half from learning.

    That does make more work with phonecalls home and stuff though, so...
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    (Original post by Suzanathema)
    I'm in my NQT year and I do this.


    Yellow is the first warning. It signifies that their behaviour is disrupting learning. A yellow warning might be something like talking over my voice, shouting out, etc.

    A red warning is when they have been given the warning but they do it again. So a second instance of shouting out.

    After their two warnings I send them out, as they are not making any steps to try and modify their behaviour.


    Of course sometimes big instances like throwing something or swearing at another member of the class would mean being sent straight out but I find that yellow and red helps control the low level stuff.

    I´m waiting for a laminator and then I can make durable cards. I teach Spanish children, which can be very difficult.
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    (Original post by Suzanathema)
    It depends when it happens.

    Usually disruption in my lessons occurs when I am talking. I'm not some big talker, I do get the whole student-centred learning thing, but sometimes things need explaining and for that I expect silence. In that case, I make them wait outside until I'm done with the explanation and then go out to find somewhere for them to work.

    Usually it's a nearby classroom but if that would cause more disruption than it'd solve (like when all of of the challenging side of Y9 are being taught at the same time) I would park them in the HOD's office and send work out.


    I was doing this for a while with no actual improvements to classroom behaviour the following lesson so now being sent out means a phonecall home and an after school detention. It's slowly wearing them down.



    I can send as many out as I want. In fact, the more I send out the better as far as my mentor is concerned. If you put up with poor behaviour because of some judgement on how many students you're sending out, to me that suggests standards are being lowered. Keep them high, send half the class out if they are stopping the other half from learning.

    That does make more work with phonecalls home and stuff though, so...
    I just worry about the mischief some of the naughtier/younger pupils may get up to if I had more than one out at a time where they couldn't be seen - I suppose I could have the door open with them standing outside, but then they could still chose to be as disruptive as when they are in the room- I will have to try it and see!!
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    I just worry about the mischief some of the naughtier/younger pupils may get up to if I had more than one out at a time where they couldn't be seen - I suppose I could have the door open with them standing outside, but then they could still chose to be as disruptive as when they are in the room- I will have to try it and see!!

    Yeah I try and get them into another classroom as soon as I can to stop this happening.

    It has happened before, but the HOD came out of his office and had a massive go at them for messing about in the corridor, so actually no blame was put on me.

    The worst I have at the moment is when they refuse to leave. I can't physically remove them from the room so have to get SLT on call to come and do it. Some students refuse and then sit and smirk at me until someone arrives to remove them because they know it's wrecked the pace of my lesson and undermined my authority. I hate that.
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    I´m very frightened and anxious. I can´t continue like this.
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    Yup we do! however it does tend to be filled with catch up work, its still an extra couple of days off though and very much appreciated!
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    How is everyone managing to build relationships with parents for Standard 8?

    I am finding it somewhat challenging as Parents' Evening was before I began the placement and other mediums such as IEP meetings could be considered too sensitive/confidential for trainees to attend.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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    (Original post by Alexamae_)
    How is everyone managing to build relationships with parents for Standard 8?

    I am finding it somewhat challenging as Parent's Evening was before I began the placement and other mediums such as IEP meetings could be considered too sensitive/confidential for trainees to attend.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App

    It's early days. You'll definitely get a chance on your second placement.
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    (Original post by Alexamae_)
    How is everyone managing to build relationships with parents for Standard 8?

    I am finding it somewhat challenging as Parent's Evening was before I began the placement and other mediums such as IEP meetings could be considered too sensitive/confidential for trainees to attend.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    You could do stuff like ringing home/sending an email for something positive a kid has done. It's a really awesome thing to do, especially for "bad" kids, as most parents expect that every phone call from the school will be horrible.
    Try it, it's will make you feel so good!
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    (Original post by Becca)
    You could do stuff like ringing home/sending an email for something positive a kid has done. It's a really awesome thing to do, especially for "bad" kids, as most parents expect that every phone call from the school will be horrible.
    Try it, it's will make you feel so good!
    You might need to remember that sometimes you may ring a difficult child's home to say how good they have been and the parent is not bothered - it really is heart-breaking! However I have rang once about a difficult child and her dad was really pleased.
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    (Original post by Alexamae_)
    How is everyone managing to build relationships with parents for Standard 8?

    I am finding it somewhat challenging as Parents' Evening was before I began the placement and other mediums such as IEP meetings could be considered too sensitive/confidential for trainees to attend.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    Letters home, phone calls (less likely), contact books if they are relevant/homework diary comments, seeing them face to face (easier in primary)
 
 
 
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