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    (Original post by tigerz)
    haha you beat me to it :P Yeah i've only learnt how to use latex today so its takes me ages!
    use this: http://www.numberempire.com/texequat...tioneditor.php it's quicker than writing the code on here as it writes out the code for u, just copy the code into the reply box and add latex in font and end of your code. (i.e. .)
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    Here, I didn't want to bother to type out the latex so I wrote it out and uploaded it.

    Excuse my sloppy handwriting

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    (Original post by ryanb97)
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    The gradient of C at Q is -1/2

    dy/dx is the gradient.

    So dy/dx at Q would be -1/2
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    The gradient of C at Q is -1/2

    dy/dx is the gradient.

    So dy/dx at Q would be -1/2
    ok.. so how did you get
    (1/2)X = -(1/2) ?
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    Is
    P(A' and B')=1-P(A and B)
    ?
    (Sorry, if it is a really stupid question.)
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    On Arsey's old C2 thread, he wrote for the trapezium rule use table function on calc to fill in the gaps, can someone explain what this means? I normally just sub in the value of x into the equation?
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    (Original post by ryanb97)
    ok.. so how did you get
    (1/2)X = -(1/2) ?
    y = \dfrac{1}{4}x^2

    So just differentiate?
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    (Original post by nm786)
    use this: http://www.numberempire.com/texequat...tioneditor.php it's quicker than writing the code on here as it writes out the code for u, just copy the code into the reply box and add latex in font and end of your code. (i.e. .)
    :O thank you! This is so much easier!
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    (Original post by purplemind)
    Is
    P(A' and B')=1-P(A and B)
    ?
    (Sorry, if it is a really stupid question.)
    By "and", do you mean \cap or U ?
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    (Original post by purplemind)
    Is
    P(A' and B')=1-P(A and B)
    ?
    (Sorry, if it is a really stupid question.)
    1 - P (A U B) (A or B or both)
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    By "and", do you mean \cap or U ?
    \cap
    (Original post by Boy_wonder_95)
    1 - P (A U B) (A or B or both)
    Don't get it. xD

    Well, really, I have no idea what I am doing anyway. -.-
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    y = \dfrac{1}{4}x^2

    So just differentiate?
    how does that follow on from this?

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    i can do the rest of the question ( using your values though )

    ryan
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    (Original post by purplemind)
    \cap

    Don't get it. xD

    Well, really, I have no idea what I am doing anyway. -.-
    P( A' \cap B' ) = 1 - P(A \cup B)

    Try doing a Venn diagram, maybe that would help you understand.
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    P( A' \cap B' ) = 1 - P(A \cup B)

    Try doing a Venn diagram, maybe that would help you understand.
    Venn diagrams confuse me as ****.
    Anyway, this should be enough to solve my problem (I shall see!)
    So good I have never seen a question like that on the OCR S1 exam.
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    (Original post by ryanb97)
    how does that follow on from this?

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    i can do the rest of the question ( using your values though )

    ryan
    Hmm?

    You understand that m at Q is -\dfrac{1}{2} ?

    You understand this means that \dfrac{dy}{dx} at Q is -\dfrac{1}{2} ?

    You understand that y = \dfrac{1}{4}x^2 \Rightarrow \dfrac{dy}{dx} = \dfrac{1}{2}x ?

    and thus \dfrac{1}{2}x = -\dfrac{1}{2} ?
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    (Original post by purplemind)
    Venn diagrams confuse me as ****.
    Anyway, this should be enough to solve my problem (I shall see!)
    So good I have never seen a question like that on the OCR S1 exam.
    Learn some set theory I studied some when I was in year 10, S1 venn diagrams take the piss in comparison.
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    Could anyone help me with what looks like it should be a basic vectors question?

    If A, B and C are three points with co ordinates (-2,1,2) (2,3,5) and (1,-4,z)

    a. find the value of z given that CBA is a right angle

    So I thought that because CBA is a 90 angle, cos90 = 0 b.c = 0 but that doesn't get the correct answer

    I've also done other stuff but can't seem to get 11

    any help?
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    (Original post by purplemind)
    Venn diagrams confuse me as ****.
    Anyway, this should be enough to solve my problem (I shall see!)
    So good I have never seen a question like that on the OCR S1 exam.
    Shall I send you some s1 notes?
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    Learn some set theory I studied some when I was in year 10, S1 venn diagrams take the piss in comparison.
    Hahaha, I did last year. It's a shame I forgot most of it.
    Aww, I'm giving up now. Hate it. :mad:
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    (Original post by tigerz)
    Shall I send you some s1 notes?
    It would be really nice.
 
 
 
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