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    Oh good. I was thinking a decision on my fitness to practice has been made based on the information I've put in the questionnaire.
    Congratulations on achieving the conditions of your offer


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    (Original post by TheYorkist)
    Oh good. I was thinking a decision on my fitness to practice has been made based on the information I've put in the questionnaire.
    Congratulations on achieving the conditions of your offer


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    Thanks! Well done to you for getting in too! :thumbsup:
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    Just a question to current students, do you suggest we brush up on any biology before starting? I haven't studied biology for over a year and I've forgotten most of it, so I'm a bit concerned I'll have a lot of catching up to do...
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    (Original post by Rumschpringe)
    Just a question to current students, do you suggest we brush up on any biology before starting? I haven't studied biology for over a year and I've forgotten most of it, so I'm a bit concerned I'll have a lot of catching up to do...
    No.
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    No.
    ok.
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    (Original post by Rumschpringe)
    Just a question to current students, do you suggest we brush up on any biology before starting? I haven't studied biology for over a year and I've forgotten most of it, so I'm a bit concerned I'll have a lot of catching up to do...


    its not necessary but it certainly wouldn't hurt!
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    No.
    Whats with this new curriculum thing then? As a current medic @ L'pool (in one of the older years ) it has no effect on me, but arent they gunna do teaching of basic sciences from this academic year to the lower years?
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    (Original post by *Dreamer*)
    Whats with this new curriculum thing then? As a current medic @ L'pool (in one of the older years ) it has no effect on me, but arent they gunna do teaching of basic sciences from this academic year to the lower years?
    That's precisely the intended change. I believe there will be less focus on clinical attachments in second year now as well with a view to dedicated anatomy, physiology and biochemistry teaching in first and second years and more focused pathology teaching in second year and thereafter.

    Unfortunately, the medical school hasn't quite released specific details so apart from the review (linked to in my OP), there is an element of pot luck about the structure of Year 1 and 3 this coming September. The only other change is to Year 5 where the PETA is becoming managed electronically.
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    That's precisely the intended change. I believe there will be less focus on clinical attachments in second year now as well with a view to dedicated anatomy, physiology and biochemistry teaching in first and second years and more focused pathology teaching in second year and thereafter.

    Unfortunately, the medical school hasn't quite released specific details so apart from the review (linked to in my OP), there is an element of pot luck about the structure of Year 1 and 3 this coming September. The only other change is to Year 5 where the PETA is becoming managed electronically.
    Lol pathology - two letters T.H :rolleyes: they don't know what they're in for haha

    OK, thats good for them - its about time that teaching was introduced. I love uni but the laissez-faire approach is lazy IMO - some things just have to get taught
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    (Original post by *Dreamer*)
    Lol pathology - two letters T.H :rolleyes: they don't know what they're in for haha

    OK, thats good for them - its about time that teaching was introduced. I love uni but the laissez-faire approach is lazy IMO - some things just have to get taught
    Pathology is key, imo. For those entering a hospital-based career, without key knowledge of basic pathology, there is no hope. For example, if I were to ask the inflammation process (which is pathophysiology) leading to scar healing, I doubt more than 10% of the current crop of third years could answer competently. Yet, it is the core ideology behind surgical incisions.

    I agree that the teaching has been relatively poor thus far. Whilst more of it was necessary, I don't want Liverpool to burden students with information. I would much rather I had the time to study how, when and where I want. That was one of the big positives for me. Instead of adding a lot of teaching, students would benefit from more quality teaching instead. Some of the lectures that I sat through in 2nd and 3rd year were utterly pointless and people stopped attending lectures given by certain lecturers.
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    Pathology is key, imo. For those entering a hospital-based career, without key knowledge of basic pathology, there is no hope. For example, if I were to ask the inflammation process (which is pathophysiology) leading to scar healing, I doubt more than 10% of the current crop of third years could answer competently. Yet, it is the core ideology behind surgical incisions.

    I agree that the teaching has been relatively poor thus far. Whilst more of it was necessary, I don't want Liverpool to burden students with information. I would much rather I had the time to study how, when and where I want. That was one of the big positives for me. Instead of adding a lot of teaching, students would benefit from more quality teaching instead. Some of the lectures that I sat through in 2nd and 3rd year were utterly pointless and people stopped attending lectures given by certain lecturers.
    I completely agree about the importance of pathology - my remark was purely about a certain pathology lecturer.

    Fair enough and I think most people understand/understood that there was a lot of independent work and I like that aspect too. Yet if we get minimal useful teaching then what are the tuition fees for - placements? It'd probably work out cheaper if we paid the hospital directly lol. But fingers crossed things will improve for the better and we'll be higher up on league tables :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by *Dreamer*)
    I completely agree about the importance of pathology - my remark was purely about a certain pathology lecturer.

    Fair enough and I think most people understand/understood that there was a lot of independent work and I like that aspect too. Yet if we get minimal useful teaching then what are the tuition fees for - placements? It'd probably work out cheaper if we paid the hospital directly lol. But fingers crossed things will improve for the better and we'll be higher up on league tables :rolleyes:
    He's the same person I was referring to, tbh.

    You haven't seen the infamous FOI request to the medical school then? The university pays unbelievable amounts of money to each hospital for student placements.
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    He's the same person I was referring to, tbh.

    You haven't seen the infamous FOI request to the medical school then? The university pays unbelievable amounts of money to each hospital for student placements.
    Ah, I can't say I have! Whats the ball park figure?

    And is it all really necessary? Ive definitely had days on placement esp in 2nd year where I could have done some reading or had a decent lecture instead of being scolded by a consultant for not knowing about primary sclerosing cholangitis, but have forced myself to be grateful for being 'taught'
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    (Original post by *Dreamer*)
    Ah, I can't say I have! Whats the ball park figure?

    And is it all really necessary? Ive definitely had days on placement esp in 2nd year where I could have done some reading or had a decent lecture instead of being scolded by a consultant for not knowing about primary sclerosing cholangitis, but have forced myself to be grateful for being 'taught'
    Per annum, just one hospital, namely the Royal, received over £22M in funding (2010-11) for having medical and dental students there. That figure increases every year, generally.

    Being grilled on clinical placements has probably taught me the most useful information throughout medical school. It's the stuff that remains with me, even now, and hopefully will help me in the future.

    Edit: Not all of that money comes from the University, btw.
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    (Original post by *Dreamer*)
    Ah, I can't say I have! Whats the ball park figure?

    And is it all really necessary? Ive definitely had days on placement esp in 2nd year where I could have done some reading or had a decent lecture instead of being scolded by a consultant for not knowing about primary sclerosing cholangitis, but have forced myself to be grateful for being 'taught'
    Here's the actual FOI requests:

    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/user/james_hare

    Knew they were somewhere!
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)


    Liverpool currently subscribes to the PBL approach (this is subject to change in the future pending review). Update: Please note that in October 2013, the decision was made to change the structure and content of the medical curriculum at Liverpool. The changes will take effect for students from the 2014 academic year onwards.

    In essence, PBL will no longer be the mainstay of medical teaching at Liverpool; there will be an increased focus on anatomy, physiology and biochemistry within years 1 and 2. Positive elements of the PBL curriculum have been retained as suggested by students and staff; however, there will be more formalised teaching and support for students. My personal opinion of these changes are very positive and I would describe the new course as an integrated spiral curriculum.

    Entry Requirements

    GCSE

    At GCSE, Liverpool require a Grade ‘C’ minimum in 9 subjects with a minimum ‘B’ in maths, English and Dual Award science.
    Candidates are scored on their GCSEs as such:
    2 points for an ‘A*’ Grade; 2 points for an ‘A’ Grade; 1 point for a ‘B’ Grade.

    The candidate’s best 9 GCSEs are scored. A minimum score of 15/18 is required for interview (more realistically this is a minimum of 16).
    More detailed information can be found on the Medicine Wiki.

    A-Level


    A typical offer is for AAAb with a minimum ‘A’ Grade required in A2 chemistry and biology.

    More detailed information can be found on the Medicine Wiki and on the Faculty of Medicine website.

    UKCAT

    The UKCAT is not required as part of the entry requirements for Liverpool.

    GAMSAT


    For 2014 entry onwards, the University of Liverpool requires GAMSAT for graduates applying to both the A100 and A101 courses.


    UniReq
    is an excellent resource which will help guide you as to whether you can apply to Liverpool or not.

    University of Liverpool Admission Statistics 2011-12.

    Interview

    Liverpool typically interview from November until March and post-interview decisions are usually released at the end of March (see Decisions). The interviews are allocated on a random basis. Early UCAS applications should theoretically receive no benefit over those submitted on deadline day.

    The interviews are informal and are designed to engage with the applicant such that they are made to feel comfortable. The interview will generally last between 15-20 minutes.

    Please note that interview discussion is not allowed on the forums.

    Decisions
    To those who want to predict when offers will come out, I may lend a helping hand (or maybe not):

    - Offers are given out at 17:00 GMT on the day.
    - Offers and Rejections are jointly handed out 'at random'.
    - Offers and Rejections are most likely batched.
    - It is most likely that the first day of offers will be towards the latter half of the working week.

    This information largely applies to undergraduate students. All information has been collated from TSR and thus is not an accurate representation of when the UoL may actually have given out offers to students in the respective years. Furthermore, it is most likely the case that offers are given out in batches over several days. As such, the days listed below are the first day of offers.

    Friday 22nd March 2013
    Thursday 22nd March 2012
    Wednesday 16th March 2011
    Thursday 18th March 2010
    Tuesday 17th March 2009

    If I were to predict, I would suggest that Thursday 20th March 2014 would be when offers will first come out. This is by no means based on any statistics and is complete guess work so don't blame me if I am wrong!

    Admission Statistics


    2010
    Places Available: 290 (+31 International)
    Applications Received: -
    Interviews: -
    Applicants to Place Ratio: -

    2011
    Places Available: 292 (+24 International)
    Applications Received: >2500
    Interviews: -
    Applicants to Place Ratio: 9

    2012
    Places Available: 235 (+29 International)
    Applications Received: 3049
    Interviews: 1079
    Applicants to Place Ratio: 12

    2013
    Places Available: 228 (+23 International)
    Applications Received: 3081
    Interviews: 1087
    Applicants to Place Ratio: 12

    Detailed Statistics for 2013 Entry

    Average GCSE score for students rejected pre-interview: 16.0/18 (median 16)
    Average GCSE score for students invited to interview: 17.3/18 (median 18)
    Average GCSE score for students given an offer: 17.4/18 (median 18)

    Average Interview score for all students: 21.2/30 (median 22)
    Average Interview score for students given an offer: 25.9/30 (median 26, minimum 23)


    A Freedom of Information request detailing interview statistics for 2011 entry can be found here.

    Summary of FOI
    I have summarised the key statistics from the FOI:

    - Over 3000 applications were received for the A100 course.
    - 1970 (65%) candidates were rejected before interview.
    - 1079 (35%) candidates were interviewed.
    - From this, 527 (49%) offers were given out.
    - 265 (50%) students enrolled in 2012.

    The key points to note regarding interview were:

    - Generally, 17+ points were required on the GCSE scoring system.
    - Generally, 26+ points were required for the Personal Statement.

    The key points to note regarding offers were:

    - Generally, 18 points were required on the GCSE scoring system.
    - Generally, 26+ points were required in the Interview scoring system.


    Course Overview

    Overall
    Liverpool currently subscribes to the PBL approach (this is subject to change in the future pending review). Update: Please note that in October 2013, the decision was made to change the structure and content of the medical curriculum at Liverpool. The changes will take effect for students from the 2014 academic year onwards.

    The current (pre-2014) undergraduate course is a 5 year MBChB degree with the potential to intercalate between 4th and 5th year in a reasonable MPhil, MRes or BSc. Final medical exams are sat at the end of 4th year. An outline of the current (pre-2014) school curriculum is described below:

    1st Year


    There is minimal clinical contact in 1st year with the focus being on the basic sciences. There is also SSM 1 which is a 4 week ‘student study module’ which has to be completed. The focus is on basic sciences, clinical skills and communication skills.

    2nd Year


    The focus of this year is to gain clinical contact and learn basic pathology for the more common disorders. Students are attached in year-long placements to a hospital. They will attend twice a week.

    Random Hospital Allocations to:

    • Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals (RLBUH)
    • University Hospital of Aintree
    • Arrowe Park
    • Whiston (St Helens & Knowsley Trust)


    There is a 6 week ‘GP and Community’ rotation interlaced with hospital placement. SSM 2 and SSM 3 are also undertaken during 2nd year.

    3rd Year

    This is specialities year with rotations aiming to cover: paediatrics, obstetrics and gynaecology, psychiatry, neurology, community medicine (GP), therapeutics (pharmacology).

    Random Hospital Allocations to:


    • Therapeutics - RLBUH/Aintree
    • Paediatrics - Alder Hey/Whiston
    • Obs & Gynae - Liverpool Women’s/Whiston
    • GP - Various
    • Psychiatry - Various
    • Neurology - Walton Centre in Aintree


    Students are also required to complete SSM 4 and a Critical Thinking Module (CTM). SSM 4 is run over approximately 4 months with students expected to work one day a week towards it. It is possible to organise this SSM yourself on a topic of your choice.

    4th Year

    This is the dreaded finals year. Unlike most medical schools, medical finals are sat at the end of 4th year. Students will have been assigned to their base hospital at the end of 3rd year (students can choose what hospital/s they want but are not guaranteed their choice depending on popularity).

    New hospital options include:


    • Blackpool
    • Warrington
    • Chester
    • Southport and Ormskirk


    The year is split into blocks of 3 rotations: surgery, medicine and specialities. There is also a weekly GP/UCCT session (rotates every week).

    Finals are sat through June and are immediately followed, since 2013 onwards, by a 5-6 week elective period. Students also have the option to intercalate instead of moving directly into 5th year (thus making it a 6 year course).



    Accommodation

    Accommodation options include on-campus and off-campus accommodation. The university accommodation website has more details.

    Off-campus accommodation is located approximately 15-20 minutes away from campus (by car or bus). This includes the Greenbank halls and the Carnatic halls.



    The University & Campus

    The university is situated near to the city centre, approximately a 15 minute walk away. There is a good mix of Victorian, red-brick buildings and modern development on the site. The university Guild is currently being renovated.

    There is relatively easy access to the university regardless of where one is situated within Liverpool. For those living in off-campus halls of residence, there is a ‘university service’ bus which runs directly between halls of residence and campus. It takes approximately 20 minutes. It is prudent to consider buying a ‘student annual saver’ pass.

    There are two libraries on campus. The Harold Cohen library is dedicated towards health sciences and will be of most use.


    The City

    Liverpool is a great city full of life. There has recently been a lot of redevelopment with renovation of the Liverpool Docks area and the completion of L1, an outside shopping mall.

    The night life is also great. There are student nights every weekday during term time and although there aren’t any huge clubs, there’s enough choice and variety to satisfy everybody.


    FAQs (answered by current medical students - FAQs about PBL/the old course are in post 2)

    What medical societies are there and what is the mentoring system like? (answered by Kyalimers)

    The mentoring system is very good. It is set up by the LMSS and works pretty effectively. A lot of other societies (such as ISOC, NHSF Liverpool, JSOC) also have some mentoring system implemented for medics.

    Medical societies are now numerous and have grown rapidly in size and number recently. They include Surgical Scousers and the Student Physicians Society which organise weekly lectures throughout the year amongst other practical courses. There is also the Liverpool Paediatric Society, Liverpool SNOGS and Liverpool Psychiatry Society. These societies offer various benefits and also organise specialties revision day-courses toward the end of the year.

    The very popular ATACC Medical Student Society which organises trauma and critical care practical teaching for students throughout the year is usually over-subscribed and has proved to be increasingly useful for clinical students.

    A full list of societies at the university can be found at the LGoS website.



    Join the Facebook Liverpool Medics 2014 Entry Group if you have an offer!
    Is there a link for a 2015 entry thread?
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    (Original post by lisa789)
    Is there a link for a 2015 entry thread?
    Haven't made one yet. May do so soon though!
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    (Original post by Cutaneoplast™)
    Just to increase my post count on TSR lols. Don't think DermSoc is part of theirs. You free on the 27th September to give a mini lecture to pre-med applicants? It's basically an access to medicine type event to help students get into medical school. And can I bribe you with a certificate? I'll PM you with more details tomorrow. Thanks.


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    Do I have a choice?

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    Did anyone get an interview without getting 18/18 for GCSE? Is it really not worth my time applying for Liverpool with my GCSE score of 17/18?


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    (Original post by ja1)
    Did anyone get an interview without getting 18/18 for GCSE? Is it really not worth my time applying for Liverpool with my GCSE score of 17/18?


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    That score is fine.
 
 
 
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