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    (Original post by Azzer11)
    I don't like talking about myself, I just struggle to think of what to say so I'm still working on the 1st paragraph unfortunately. I'm hoping to make significant progress tomorrow, maybe.
    I'm applying to read Chemistry, what about yourself?

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    Same here. My advice would be to write down as much as you can to get all the ideas on paper and then make a selection, it'll make it easier to get started. Good luck with that anyway

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    (Original post by adynaton)
    Same here. My advice would be to write down as much as you can to get all the ideas on paper and then make a selection, it'll make it easier to get started. Good luck with that anyway

    PPE
    (Original post by Azzer11)
    I don't like talking about myself, I just struggle to think of what to say so I'm still working on the 1st paragraph unfortunately. I'm hoping to make significant progress tomorrow, maybe.
    I'm applying to read Chemistry, what about yourself?
    I read other peoples' PS online in archives for inspiration and guides, made notes on books i'd read, any websites or online reading material i use, software and apps, and what they bring to my life that is beneficial and relevant to the course I am applying for.
    Focus totally on strengths and positives, mention NOTHING negative at all, there's time for that in the interview! You want to sell yourself Don't forget to tie everything you write into the course; how it helps, how it makes you a better candidate, how it enriches you as a person. Big yourself up!

    Thought trees are a great way to gather your thoughts and help you figure out a starting point. There's also a number of great online guides, including articles from major newspapers such as the Independent the Telegraph, specifically on writing great personal statements, suggesting key things to include and to exclude.

    You can do it! You got time still, don't rush! You'll smash it
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    (Original post by Ivoryfall)
    I read other peoples' PS online in archives for inspiration and guides, made notes on books i'd read, any websites or online reading material i use, software and apps, and what they bring to my life that is beneficial and relevant to the course I am applying for.
    Focus totally on strengths and positives, mention NOTHING negative at all, there's time for that in the interview! You want to sell yourself Don't forget to tie everything you write into the course; how it helps, how it makes you a better candidate, how it enriches you as a person. Big yourself up!

    Thought trees are a great way to gather your thoughts and help you figure out a starting point. There's also a number of great online guides, including articles from major newspapers such as the Independent the Telegraph, specifically on writing great personal statements, suggesting key things to include and to exclude.

    You can do it! You got time still, don't rush! You'll smash it
    Thanks for the advice, I'll take a look at the resources you mentioned tomorrow. Good luck with your application!

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    (Original post by Ivoryfall)
    I read other peoples' PS online in archives for inspiration and guides, made notes on books i'd read, any websites or online reading material i use, software and apps, and what they bring to my life that is beneficial and relevant to the course I am applying for.
    Focus totally on strengths and positives, mention NOTHING negative at all, there's time for that in the interview! You want to sell yourself Don't forget to tie everything you write into the course; how it helps, how it makes you a better candidate, how it enriches you as a person. Big yourself up!

    Thought trees are a great way to gather your thoughts and help you figure out a starting point. There's also a number of great online guides, including articles from major newspapers such as the Independent the Telegraph, specifically on writing great personal statements, suggesting key things to include and to exclude.

    You can do it! You got time still, don't rush! You'll smash it
    This is great advice, cheers!


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    I was wondering if I have any chance of getting into medicine at Oxford? I got 7A* and 5A at GCSE which was the highest of the 250 in my year (I go to a average/low state school) and 4A at AS level. I have work experience of a pharmacy, GP, Hospital and volunteer at a hospice.
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    (Original post by Ellabella26)
    I was wondering if I have any chance of getting into medicine at Oxford? I got 7A* and 5A at GCSE which was the highest of the 250 in my year (I go to a average/low state school) and 4A at AS level. I have work experience of a pharmacy, GP, Hospital and volunteer at a hospice.
    Unfortunately, your proportion of GCSEs A*s is on the low side to make a competitive chance at getting to the interview stage

    Quoting nexttime , since he may know whether your school context might make any difference :yes:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Unfortunately, your proportion of GCSEs A*s is on the low side to make a competitive chance at getting to the interview stage

    Quoting nexttime , since he may know whether your school context might make any difference :yes:
    Don't listen to him. Oxford look at your GCSE results in comparison to your whole school. So if you are getting the highest GCSE results in your school, you definitely are a strong candidate. Also, there are a lot of people who have got into Oxford with less than 7 A*'s. There's no harm in applying!

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    (Original post by monkeyboy18000)
    Don't listen to him. Oxford look at your GCSE results in comparison to your whole school. So if you are getting the highest GCSE results in your school, you definitely are a strong candidate. Also, there are a lot of people who have got into Oxford with less than 7 A*'s. There's no harm in applying!

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    I'm a she
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I'm a she
    Oops :ahee:

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    (Original post by monkeyboy18000)
    Don't listen to him. Oxford look at your GCSE results in comparison to your whole school. So if you are getting the highest GCSE results in your school, you definitely are a strong candidate. Also, there are a lot of people who have got into Oxford with less than 7 A*'s. There's no harm in applying!

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    That may be the case for most subjects, but Medicine is a particular case. Roughly 2 people got an offer with 7A*s at GCSE, and 0 with 58% A*s.

    There is harm in applying when for Medicine you only have 4 choices and want to make your chances as high as possible.
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    (Original post by ombtom)
    I got 5 A*s, 3 As, and 2 Bs, so quite similar (although not IGCSEs), and I'm applying for physics. I'm certainly not worried about my GCSEs being slightly below average; plenty of people who have been accepted in the past have had similar or worse grades. I'm concentrating on the PAT – a good score in that, together with my AAAAB at AS-level should give me a good chance. On the other hand, I haven't done any further maths yet; if you're just starting A-levels, make sure you don't forget it



    I've done all the PAT past papers (I'll go over them in a few weeks). What's the next step in preparing for it?
    Thank you very much that is a relief. But I am not going to follow with the British curriculum and I am going to change school to do the Spanish one to the `Bachillerato de Excelencia´ as I think I will stand a better chance as they do extra math and physics courses, an obligatory project to help the grade and investigate whatever you want, they have awesome teachers and they give all sorts of conferences so I think it is a nice opportunity to fill my PS of physics and math related stuff...the only thing is I dont get the chance to do FM.. But im self studying math As.
    By the way awesome results you´ve got there. What subjects are you doing? Dropping any? How´s the PAT going, I tried some math questions at the beginning of the year and didnt seem extraordinarily hard...
    Good luck with everything
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    (Original post by monkeyboy18000)
    Don't listen to him. Oxford look at your GCSE results in comparison to your whole school.

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    Is that only for schools in Britain or as well from schools from the EU/International?
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    Do the admission people have access to information about your highschool context and your gcse average amongst other students from your school? Or is this something you have to find out yourself?
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    (Original post by monkeyboy18000)
    Don't listen to him. Oxford look at your GCSE results in comparison to your whole school. So if you are getting the highest GCSE results in your school, you definitely are a strong candidate.
    I get the impression that you get lots of consideration if you school is genuinely bad, with a very low A*-C rate, or if you're from a very deprived area. Just being the best in your school does not necessarily mean you get any special consideration though.

    It does make a difference, but the bottom line is that very few get in with that proportion or number of A*. You're gambling on being in a tiny sliver of the bar chart below.

    Also, there are a lot of people who have got into Oxford with less than 7 A*'s.
    Not that many in recent years:



    There's no harm in applying!
    For medicine you've only got 4 options and with >60 percent of applicants getting no offers at all, I'd argue considering each choice is absolutely vital.
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    How lenient would Oxford be if I were lucky enough to be given an interview but then tried to mess with the given dates? Basically, for my course the days are all day Wednesday, Thursday and Friday but I have school-related commitments on the Thursday and Friday afternoons which I would not be able to get out of (and which I wouldn't want to get out of anyway.) If I had a letter signed by my headmistress and parents would they consider doing all my interviews on the Wednesday (and even early Thursday morning?) Or on different days?
    If not I have no idea what I'd do: go to the interviews and forget my commitments, forget about Oxford, or apply again next year...
    PS I am not assuming I will get an interview, far from it. Just planning ahead in case


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    (Original post by lucyx)
    How lenient would Oxford be if I were lucky enough to be given an interview but then tried to mess with the given dates? Basically, for my course the days are all day Wednesday, Thursday and Friday but I have school-related commitments on the Thursday and Friday afternoons which I would not be able to get out of (and which I wouldn't want to get out of anyway.) If I had a letter signed by my headmistress and parents would they consider doing all my interviews on the Wednesday (and even early Thursday morning?) Or on different days?
    If not I have no idea what I'd do: go to the interviews and forget my commitments, forget about Oxford, or apply again next year...
    PS I am not assuming I will get an interview, far from it. Just planning ahead in case


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    They would not re-arrange for school commitments. The only time I believe they would re-arrange the interviews is for extreme circumstances.

    Are the school commitments really that important? No offence - but the interviews are three days of the whole year. I'm guessing the commitments must be very important if you're considering delaying your whole start of university for a year just to attend them?
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    (Original post by lucyx)
    How lenient would Oxford be if I were lucky enough to be given an interview but then tried to mess with the given dates?
    Absolutely 0 leniency. Its organisational hell anyway with hundreds of tutors and many thousands of interviewees. They will have absolute minimal flexibility.

    I do have to congratulate you on having another opportunity that you consider equivalent to an Oxford interview - must be an amazingly unfortunate strike of luck that you have two life changing opportunities coming up on the same day!
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    (Original post by Gerald DGrilla)
    Do you mind if I ask in which subjects he missed the A*s?
    English and history but they may go up!
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Absolutely 0 leniency. Its organisational hell anyway with hundreds of tutors and many thousands of interviewees. They will have absolute minimal flexibility.

    I do have to congratulate you on having another opportunity that you consider equivalent to an Oxford interview - must be an amazingly unfortunate strike of luck that you have two life changing opportunities coming up on the same day!
    (Original post by Lucilou101)
    They would not re-arrange for school commitments. The only time I believe they would re-arrange the interviews is for extreme circumstances.

    Are the school commitments really that important? No offence - but the interviews are three days of the whole year. I'm guessing the commitments must be very important if you're considering delaying your whole start of university for a year just to attend them?
    Thank you for your responses. The school commitments are 1. The carol service, in which I am a chorister and, as Head Girl, the only student reader and 2. The school play, in which I am playing a main part. Of course I was not underplaying the importance of an Oxford interview. Rather, I was just questioning whether there was any leniency at all. Too optimistic, I know.

    The deadline is October 15. Approximately when would you find out if you were invited for an interview? Thank you.


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    (Original post by lucyx)
    Thank you for your responses. The school commitments are 1. The carol service, in which I am a chorister and, as Head Girl, the only student reader and 2. The school play, in which I am playing a main part. Of course I was not underplaying the importance of an Oxford interview. Rather, I was just questioning whether there was any leniency at all. Too optimistic, I know.

    The deadline is October 15. Approximately when would you find out if you were invited for an interview? Thank you.


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    I think it would be more likely for your school to rearrange the dates of the service/play.. i'm guessing you are not the only one that is applying to Oxford and would potentially have interview dates on those days, and at the end of the day your interview is a hell of a lot more important!

    I'm sure the admissions tutor will love you for making him reschedule an interview so you can sing Away in the Manger, but oh well.
 
 
 
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