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    (Original post by Magnanimity)
    My problem is that I was investigated at all. A basic blood test when I was 15 and that was it. I also don't think anxiety should be the first diagnosis for abdominal pain. I think one of the many GPs I saw at my practice could have referred me to a gastro for endoscopy/colonoscopy a lot earlier. You and I both know the risks of untreated coeliacs, and also the risk of sjogrens. And I already have generalised lymphadenopathy both superficial and deep which I was CT scanned for about 3 weeks ago pretty scary.

    With the Sjogren's, I can understand missing that. However, having a raised ESR, AST, IgG, WBC - you might want to look into it rather than ignore it. I'm not saying Sjogrens would jump out at you but you might think hmm, I wonder where that inflammation is coming from. Indeed, my GP phoned me a few weeks after the rheumatologist diagnosis, telling me I had a normal blood result. I had to tell him no, I have Sjogrens, unless it's magically disappeared, they're not normal.

    When my gastroenterologist saw the blood results, he went on and tested me and I had loads of rheumatoid factor swimming about and was anti-ro, anti-la +ve. It's not that big of a deal to know you have Sjogren's but if I'd gone on to have a kid, I might have got a shock, being anti-ro +ve and all

    I think the point people are trying to make is that having a medical degree doesn't make you a good doctor. I don't think it should mean that their mistakes should be swept under the carpet because medicine is complex. I can understand their frustration because my life would have been a lot simpler. And I don't think coeliac's is so rare that it wouldn't be considered - especially with a family history I don't have a conscious memory prior to my diagnosis of a pain-free day, and that could easily have been avoided if my GP had just pulled the finger out and endoscopied me several years go.
    Indeed, you have had a crappy time, and somebody probably should have thought of your diagnosis sooner. But there are a lot of people out there spouting crap on threads like this without any REAL justification. Perhaps the doctors should have explained things better at the time, and why the diagnosis wasn't made earlier - as I've already said, it's not always possible at first presentation.

    I don't think we should sweep mistakes or bad practice under the carpet at all, but I also don't think that people vilifying doctors for misinformed reasons is ever going to help.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Or again, maybe, as we've pointed out, things weren't obvious at all initially?


    Coeliacs yes - sjogrens is probably something most GPs will only come across a handful of times in their lifetime. Unfortunately the nature of coeliac disease means it often is not the first diagnosis that springs to mind (and shouldn't be) when a patient presents. However, in your case it seems you had a really awful time - sounds like the GP did the only-too-easy thing of assuming the initial hypothesis was right after all those years rather than going back to question it. :rolleyes:

    In general though, I'm inclined to think that people haven't read the few posts in here from actual medics/doctors and really don't understand just how complex clinical medicine is.
    no.. it is was pretty obvious. my oncologist described it as gross negligance actually.
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    I've had a massive aortic aneurysm you say? Wait, let me google this.
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    I think if you have a very routine, common physical illness then it's wise to just take the drugs. But if you have something unusual or it's not clearing up following standard treatments then it's time to start doing a bit of research and using some healthy skeptism to try to question your doctor and find out as many options available to you as possible. There's nothing wrong with that IMO.

    Also, if you have something unusual I think a patient should keep some sort of symptoms diary record so a doctor can see a proper history. They are only human afterall and will go for the most likely reason for your symptoms rather than exploring every avenue. So if things aren't clearing up then it's up to you really to start to question it and record your body's responses appropriately then you're more likely to have them find out if it's anything out of the ordinary.
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    (Original post by chebanana)
    My Dad and a few other people are considering filing charges against a local GP who has been consistently negligible for the past few years, for example, he told my Dad that he had "indigestion" after he suffered from terrible pain in his stomach, and prescribed him indigestion meds. My Dad decided to see another doctor who took a few minutes to diagnose bowel cancer with diverticulitis. Needless to say, he's extremely lucky to be alive, let alone be independent of a wheelchair, in fact, he's the first person from his ward to totally recover with only a few problems (namely, dying on the operating table, but that's a whole other kettle of fish). Overall though, I think this GP is in the minority, lord knows, it's bloody hard to get a medicine degree, so it's not like they let idiots poke and prod us.
    same my dad when to the gp for about 4 years complaining of flushes, bowl pain a whole list of things. they did a blood test or two and sent him away. Last year a student doctor suggested a cat scan on a whim. turns out he has carcinoid cancer in 3 organs and now less than a year to live. They assured us it would have been totally treatable if they'd caught it earlier. Thanks doctor that helped.
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    (Original post by justasmalltowngirl)
    same my dad when to the gp for about 4 years complaining of flushes, bowl pain a whole list of things. they did a blood test or two and sent him away. Last year a student doctor suggested a cat scan on a whim. turns out he has carcinoid cancer in 3 organs and now less than a year to live. They assured us it would have been totally treatable if they'd caught it earlier. Thanks doctor that helped.
    Again it's sad that it was missed but i doubt the GP in question meant to cause harm. Just to add i don't see why you were so shocked a student suggested a scan?
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    (Original post by Planto)
    All very good points, if people were talking about prescribing themselves medicine, but they're not. They're discussing whether to complete a prescription, which is a totally different matter. You're not going to overdose or poison yourself by choosing NOT to take medicine, unless it's something very serious, in which case you'll be seeing a specialist anyway. Whenever I've been prescribed antibiotics I've always done my research used my own judgment in deciding whether to bother carrying on.
    I couldn't be bothered to read the whole thread because it's so stupid, so this as probably been said already, but...

    do you have any idea how damaging it is not to finish a course of antibiotics once you've started? This is why we listen to doctors.
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    (Original post by Trigger)
    Again it's sad that it was missed but i doubt the GP in question meant to cause harm. Just to add i don't see why you were so shocked a student suggested a scan?
    No I meant to mean it was a student doctor who was right which contrasts the common thinking out Ill trained new doctors and that doctors are gettiing worse . As for my dad I don't blame the doctors they didn't make him ill and they do help a lot now . But in future I'd say. Trust urself not the gp
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    This one time I was at the doctor's and the GP I was seeing (he was a student I think) started tapping away on his keyboard so we looked over his shoulder and he was - I kid you not - searching "symptoms of type one diabetes" on Google... :facepalm:

    In general though, my experience with doctors has been very positive, and I would trust a doctor any day over my own "research" or anyone else's.
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    (Original post by moregano)
    This one time I was at the doctor's and the GP I was seeing (he was a student I think) started tapping away on his keyboard so we looked over his shoulder and he was - I kid you not - searching "symptoms of type one diabetes" on Google... :facepalm:

    In general though, my experience with doctors has been very positive, and I would trust a doctor any day over my own "research" or anyone else's.

    lol ive seen my doctor do that aswell, but then again if a patient asks me if something is abnormal in his observations and im unsure, and cant ask a member of staff i look it up in my book infront of them :p:
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    (Original post by _Demosthenes)
    I couldn't be bothered to read the whole thread because it's so stupid, so this as probably been said already, but...

    do you have any idea how damaging it is not to finish a course of antibiotics once you've started? This is why we listen to doctors.
    Read the thread or go away.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    lol ive seen my doctor do that aswell, but then again if a patient asks me if something is abnormal in his observations and im unsure, and cant ask a member of staff i look it up in my book infront of them :p:
    Looking it up in a book is one thing, but if I want to Google my symptoms I can do that quite easily from the comfort of my own home :rolleyes:

    And it's fair enough to look things up, obviously doctors can't remember absolutely everything, but diabetes symptoms are pretty basic knowledge, right?
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    (Original post by moregano)
    And it's fair enough to look things up, obviously doctors can't remember absolutely everything, but diabetes symptoms are pretty basic knowledge, right?
    Yer. A third year student could probably name you five or six, a houseman might be able to reel off maybe twenty, GPs and endocrinologists would probably be able to think of a few more. Is that enough?
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    What an old thread :nothing:
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Yer. A third year student could probably name you five or six, a houseman might be able to reel off maybe twenty, GPs and endocrinologists would probably be able to think of a few more. Is that enough?
    Exactly, so why was he wasting time messing about on Google, shouldn't he have just done a finger prick test straight away? But all is forgiven, and I'm sure he's learned his lesson :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by moregano)
    Exactly, so why was he wasting time messing about on Google, shouldn't he have just done a finger prick test straight away? But all is forgiven, and I'm sure he's learned his lesson :rolleyes:

    Bm's dont diagnose diabetes there and then, just tells you your blood glucose levels at that moment
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    Bm's dont diagnose diabetes there and then, just tells you your blood glucose levels at that moment
    Yeah but if it's through the roof...
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    (Original post by moregano)
    Exactly, so why was he wasting time messing about on Google, shouldn't he have just done a finger prick test straight away? But all is forgiven, and I'm sure he's learned his lesson :rolleyes:
    This is why the general public's criticism of the medical profession always needs to be looked at carefully...
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    (Original post by moregano)
    Yeah but if it's through the roof...
    Then what? Must be the diabeetus? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by moregano)
    Yeah but if it's through the roof...

    maybe you'd just eaten? it needs to be done over a period of time to get a good idea, plus other tests aswell, BM's dont say much, plus can be rather unreliable if done wrong (recent research shows many GP's are doing them wrong, although im sure renal will defend this!)
 
 
 
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