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    (Original post by insideedge)
    Hi, has anyone had CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) ? I have Anxiety, OCD and Mild social Anxiety and mild depression too. I am feeling pretty horrid lately and want to get it 'fixed'.

    I'd imagine the wait on the NHS is very long, so would it be best to get treatment done privately e.g BUPA? It will cost a lot but I'm willing to pay, the level of care will be better and I imagine I'll be able to have a therapist who has recent success of 'curing' such mental illnesses...
    Can't put a price on happiness hey...

    I'd really appreciate replies here guys and of any experiences with CBT.
    I had my first CBT session last Friday, though it was more continuing my psychological assessment than actual proper CBT stuff. I'm doing it on the NHS and only had to wait a month between them deciding they were going to offer it and the first session. I thought this was pretty quick, given what you hear about the NHS, but they were apologising for it taking so long!

    That said, I really do believe it's a postcode lottery and that I'm lucky with the borough I live in. I'm doing my CBT with a lovely trainee psychologist and am having weekly sessions, indefinitely (as far as I can tell. At least six though, to be followed by a review)
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I had my first CBT session last Friday, though it was more continuing my psychological assessment than actual proper CBT stuff. I'm doing it on the NHS and only had to wait a month between them deciding they were going to offer it and the first session. I thought this was pretty quick, given what you hear about the NHS, but they were apologising for it taking so long!

    That said, I really do believe it's a postcode lottery and that I'm lucky with the borough I live in. I'm doing my CBT with a lovely trainee psychologist and am having weekly sessions, indefinitely (as far as I can tell. At least six though, to be followed by a review)
    Can I ask, what borough are you in? I'm in Southwark and they said it was a huge waiting list
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    (Original post by Zebrastripes)
    Can I ask, what borough are you in? I'm in Southwark and they said it was a huge waiting list
    Richmond :yes:
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've suffered from pretty severe OCD for five years now; it crushed myself confidence and made me a pretty messed up individual.

    Only now am I kind of coming to terms with the fact that I really do need help (taken long enough)..and I'm so tired of having to pretend everything's okay- I daren't moan about it incase I annoy people.

    My parents still don't know but I hate to admit I can't help but feel ashamed and embarassed even though I know I shouldn't.

    Anyway, I'm interested in how people handle it whether it's yourself or someone you know.

    I think that there should be more of an emphasis on recognising mental illnesses because in my experience nobody really talks about them because they're kind of invisible if you get what I mean and my parents have often just labelled me as a 'hormonal' teenager :/
    its a *****. mental illness puts off employers. it also puts off people from getting close to you. nobody wants to invite the "bi polar skitzo" to the party.

    where some people will be worried that you are unpredictable and may go crazy on them. some people see it as a weakness and see you as someone they can **** with.

    i only tell people who get close to me who need a reasonable explination for why i run off randomly and alienate myself from the ones i love.

    lol its funny i just got to thinking its a bit like being a werewolf
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I had my first CBT session last Friday, though it was more continuing my psychological assessment than actual proper CBT stuff. I'm doing it on the NHS and only had to wait a month between them deciding they were going to offer it and the first session. I thought this was pretty quick, given what you hear about the NHS, but they were apologising for it taking so long!

    That said, I really do believe it's a postcode lottery and that I'm lucky with the borough I live in. I'm doing my CBT with a lovely trainee psychologist and am having weekly sessions, indefinitely (as far as I can tell. At least six though, to be followed by a review)
    Lucky you! please can you keep us updated with how the CBT is going? That'd be great. i've considered going private but the costs are a big turn-off, but you can't put a price on mental stability and happiness I suppose!
    What have you been diagnosed with officially if you don't mind me saying?
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    (Original post by insideedge)
    Lucky you! please can you keep us updated with how the CBT is going? That'd be great. i've considered going private but the costs are a big turn-off, but you can't put a price on mental stability and happiness I suppose!
    What have you been diagnosed with officially if you don't mind me saying?

    I'd rather not say at the moment, as the diagnosis appears to have changed... again :sigh: I'm not entirely clear as to what it's changed to :ninja:

    Prior to Tuesday, the diagnosis was severe depression with psychotic symptoms but I think my psych might have decided he was wrong. Again :sigh:

    I wouldn't be able to go private, so I'm quite lucky. Will try and post here once in a while
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    Ruined it.
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    (Original post by Mick.w)
    its a *****. mental illness puts off employers. it also puts off people from getting close to you. nobody wants to invite the "bi polar skitzo" to the party.

    where some people will be worried that you are unpredictable and may go crazy on them. some people see it as a weakness and see you as someone they can **** with.

    i only tell people who get close to me who need a reasonable explination for why i run off randomly and alienate myself from the ones i love.

    lol its funny i just got to thinking its a bit like being a werewolf
    I can relate to this. the ones who are ok with it tend to be the ones who have had some sort of experience it with family/friends/themselves
    • #25
    #25

    Depression has definitely made me into hte person I am today, which is not a person I like! I've been depressed for 10 years, I am 18 now, and although 8 sounds like a young age to have it, I remember hiding and crying a lot, because i didn't want anyone to know. I've never felt happy for as long as I can remember. My experiences with CBT have not been successful - I've been lucky enough to be able to go private, but 18 months on and I feel no different. Spent time in hospital, tried 2 different drugs (they made me so ill it was better being depressed...), moved out for a while for a change of scene... still the same.

    It didn't help that my school made me see a psychologist who flat out refused that I had depression "You aren't depressed, you don't act like it". I told her it was because after so many years, I was pretty darned good at acting happy. She didn't believe me. So this postponed my diagnosis until I eventually went to the GP because it was starting to affect my health in other ways - always getting ill, hair falling out etc etc. Then I started losing my memory in lower 6th, there are gaps of a few months at a time where I don't remember a thing I did. I couldn't remember from one day to the next what day it was, what i'd eaten, anything. My concentration went to the cleaners, my friend had to read the instructions to me in a practical science exam because i couldn't understand them. All in all, it was nothing short of petrifying. I'm still ill, although my memory is partially back. I am struggling with learning things for exams, but at the end of the day, they aren't the be-all-and-end-all. At least I can remember what I ate yesterday...

    The highlight of this year was definitely being asked in my interview at a certain extremely-hard-to-get-into-university "So, tell me about your extenuating circumstances"... Definitely hard to keep back the tears, although I managed it, surprisingly! It's difficult, because I want to be a doctor, and somehow they think that if you have depression you're a danger to other people, which I know I'm not...
    • #26
    #26

    (Original post by insideedge)
    Hi, has anyone had CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) ? I have Anxiety, OCD and Mild social Anxiety and mild depression too. I am feeling pretty horrid lately and want to get it 'fixed'.

    I'd imagine the wait on the NHS is very long, so would it be best to get treatment done privately e.g BUPA? It will cost a lot but I'm willing to pay, the level of care will be better and I imagine I'll be able to have a therapist who has recent success of 'curing' such mental illnesses...
    Can't put a price on happiness hey...

    I'd really appreciate replies here guys and of any experiences with CBT.
    I'd recommend going private if you can afford it. I've been seeing NHS doctors/psychologists for 5 years and they've only just decided that I'm seeing the wrong people they should have referred me to the right people ages ago. That's 5 years wasted, it makes me really angry.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    The highlight of this year was definitely being asked in my interview at a certain extremely-hard-to-get-into-university "So, tell me about your extenuating circumstances"... Definitely hard to keep back the tears, although I managed it, surprisingly! It's difficult, because I want to be a doctor, and somehow they think that if you have depression you're a danger to other people, which I know I'm not...
    :console:

    If you were applying for Medicine, you'd think they'd know better than that! I really hope they were just trying to figure out whether you could cope with a high-pressure course/environment/career rather than thinking you're dangerous...
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    I'm just wondering whether any of you found it difficult to approach your doctor and speak to them about your issues? I plan to speak to mine about my mental health issues - mainly depression, but I'm afraid he'll brush it off as he can be quite abrupt.
    • #24
    #24

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Depression has definitely made me into hte person I am today, which is not a person I like! I've been depressed for 10 years, I am 18 now, and although 8 sounds like a young age to have it, I remember hiding and crying a lot, because i didn't want anyone to know. I've never felt happy for as long as I can remember. My experiences with CBT have not been successful - I've been lucky enough to be able to go private, but 18 months on and I feel no different. Spent time in hospital, tried 2 different drugs (they made me so ill it was better being depressed...), moved out for a while for a change of scene... still the same.

    It didn't help that my school made me see a psychologist who flat out refused that I had depression "You aren't depressed, you don't act like it". I told her it was because after so many years, I was pretty darned good at acting happy. She didn't believe me. So this postponed my diagnosis until I eventually went to the GP because it was starting to affect my health in other ways - always getting ill, hair falling out etc etc. Then I started losing my memory in lower 6th, there are gaps of a few months at a time where I don't remember a thing I did. I couldn't remember from one day to the next what day it was, what i'd eaten, anything. My concentration went to the cleaners, my friend had to read the instructions to me in a practical science exam because i couldn't understand them. All in all, it was nothing short of petrifying. I'm still ill, although my memory is partially back. I am struggling with learning things for exams, but at the end of the day, they aren't the be-all-and-end-all. At least I can remember what I ate yesterday...

    The highlight of this year was definitely being asked in my interview at a certain extremely-hard-to-get-into-university "So, tell me about your extenuating circumstances"... Definitely hard to keep back the tears, although I managed it, surprisingly! It's difficult, because I want to be a doctor, and somehow they think that if you have depression you're a danger to other people, which I know I'm not...
    That sounds really bad man, sorry to hear
    Why did you not find CBT helpful? after suffering from depression for most of your life, surely the NHS should have made you feel a bit better at some stage?
    I thought CBT was pretty much 100% successful. Do you also suffer from Anxiety, OCD or any other disorder?

    What uni did you apply to also and how else has your life been affected?
    Hope you don't mind answering those questions
    • #25
    #25

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    That sounds really bad man, sorry to hear
    Why did you not find CBT helpful? after suffering from depression for most of your life, surely the NHS should have made you feel a bit better at some stage?
    I thought CBT was pretty much 100% successful. Do you also suffer from Anxiety, OCD or any other disorder?

    What uni did you apply to also and how else has your life been affected?
    Hope you don't mind answering those questions

    I still have CBT, I think that as well as it just not being very successful, many of the things that have made my life difficult are still around, and while have changed, they haven't got better I guess! I don't think I suffer from any other disorder, it all stems from this. Used to have panic attacks at the most inconvenient time (like in the middle of a class).

    I would say the worst way other than what I've mentioned that life has been hard is losing friends over it. I've never been part of a "group" so I didn't have a backup or a strong rapport of friends I could trust. I told a few people but either they just couldn't deal with it or just acted like it wasn't there? I don't mind, people deal with things in their own way, but there were times where I felt totally alone, and I still do. It feels terrible lying to them, but I know I can act happy and none of them will know otherwise, and I think it would be nice to have someone who understood me enough to be able to see through it!

    I would say the one (and only positive) thing that has come out of it is that throughout last year especially, I was quite open about what I was going through. As in, nearly everyone knew. This wasn't an advantage in itself, because people treated me very differently, like someone's already said, who wants to have the depressed person at the party? But what it did do was break a bit of stigma about it, and a few people came to me to talk about what was happening to them, which was similar. It was nice to know that I'd helped them come to terms with what was happening to them

    The uni was... I'm not sure I'm allowed to say. but think top UK university and it'll probably be on the list!

    And how about you? I think you said above you were thinking about CBT? x
    • #24
    #24

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I still have CBT, I think that as well as it just not being very successful, many of the things that have made my life difficult are still around, and while have changed, they haven't got better I guess! I don't think I suffer from any other disorder, it all stems from this. Used to have panic attacks at the most inconvenient time (like in the middle of a class).

    I would say the worst way other than what I've mentioned that life has been hard is losing friends over it. I've never been part of a "group" so I didn't have a backup or a strong rapport of friends I could trust. I told a few people but either they just couldn't deal with it or just acted like it wasn't there? I don't mind, people deal with things in their own way, but there were times where I felt totally alone, and I still do. It feels terrible lying to them, but I know I can act happy and none of them will know otherwise, and I think it would be nice to have someone who understood me enough to be able to see through it!

    I would say the one (and only positive) thing that has come out of it is that throughout last year especially, I was quite open about what I was going through. As in, nearly everyone knew. This wasn't an advantage in itself, because people treated me very differently, like someone's already said, who wants to have the depressed person at the party? But what it did do was break a bit of stigma about it, and a few people came to me to talk about what was happening to them, which was similar. It was nice to know that I'd helped them come to terms with what was happening to them

    The uni was... I'm not sure I'm allowed to say. but think top UK university and it'll probably be on the list!

    And how about you? I think you said above you were thinking about CBT? x
    I want to have CBT as for as long as I can remember I've not felt very comfortable in social situations...but when some friends invite me out for a drink and I really have to force myself to go, when I'm there I actually enjoy myself... it's more a case of me worrying about going out for some reason... My friends all say I'm funny etc and if you met me you'd never knew I had anxiety or any mild social anxiety symptoms... I'm also very body conscious and I always feel that people are judging me on my appearance. I am 20 and have never had a girlfriends, still a virgin, yet people say I'm good looking etc. I just wanna be 'normal', confident in myself and my personality, be fun to be around and if someone invites me out, I'll have no hesitation in accepting their invitation. If CBT offers me this, I will pay ANYTHING to feel better

    Well done on the uni stuff too man
    • #25
    #25

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I want to have CBT as for as long as I can remember I've not felt very comfortable in social situations...but when some friends invite me out for a drink and I really have to force myself to go, when I'm there I actually enjoy myself... it's more a case of me worrying about going out for some reason... My friends all say I'm funny etc and if you met me you'd never knew I had anxiety or any mild social anxiety symptoms... I'm also very body conscious and I always feel that people are judging me on my appearance. I am 20 and have never had a girlfriend, still a virgin, yet people say I'm good looking etc. I just wanna be 'normal', confident in myself and my personality, be fun to be around and if someone invites me out, I'll have no hesitation in accepting their invitation. If CBT offers me this, I will pay ANYTHING to feel better

    Well done on the uni stuff too man
    Haha may I just mention that I did subsequently get a rejection from said university. I don't mind though . I think CBT might help you because you know exactly what you want out of it and therefore thye'll be able to start targetting it straight away. With me, it was kind of "I just want to feel better" and it took months of digging to work out what was causing it even.

    Do you think you know why you feel like that before you go out? I often think that people invite me out because they feel like they ought to and not for the reason that they actually want me there, which could quite possibly be true, but at the end of the day I try to tell myself that they have invited you so they obviously care .

    I think you've got to remember also that while people do judge on appearances (I would be lying if I said they didn't), if you're just normal looking, noone's going to think any better/worse of you or judge you in any way!

    If there's anything else you want to talk about I'm all ears x
    • #24
    #24

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Haha may I just mention that I did subsequently get a rejection from said university. I don't mind though . I think CBT might help you because you know exactly what you want out of it and therefore thye'll be able to start targetting it straight away. With me, it was kind of "I just want to feel better" and it took months of digging to work out what was causing it even.

    Do you think you know why you feel like that before you go out? I often think that people invite me out because they feel like they ought to and not for the reason that they actually want me there, which could quite possibly be true, but at the end of the day I try to tell myself that they have invited you so they obviously care .

    I think you've got to remember also that while people do judge on appearances (I would be lying if I said they didn't), if you're just normal looking, noone's going to think any better/worse of you or judge you in any way!

    If there's anything else you want to talk about I'm all ears x
    Hey man
    May I ask how you got your CBT treatment? if it was on the NHS, how long did it take? Or if not, what do you think of private services? I want to be sorted soon so would like private, but If I'm paying for it, I want to ensure I get a therapist who's 'cured' people with Generalised Anxiety Disorder and Social Phobias with a bit of OCD chucked out there for good measure....!

    And I am always self conscious of how people will judge me, I hate awkward silences, but the thing is, because I'm with a good group of friends there is never any awkward silences, and when I'm with close friends I don't seem to care when there's any silent spells as it's never awkward between us if you understand what I'm saying? It sounds so stupid when typing it out, but that's really my thought processes... I also think about how I have wasted a few years of my youth (I'm 19 now, nearly 20) on how I've never wanted to go out, socialise and meet new people, I've preferred to stay in at home, as it's the easiest option isn't it? There's people who are 2 years younger who have more social experience than me... and it eats me up!
    Do you think CBT would be good or not for me? As I've go goals that I want to achieve?

    Thanks man
    • #25
    #25

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hey man
    May I ask how you got your CBT treatment? if it was on the NHS, how long did it take? Or if not, what do you think of private services? I want to be sorted soon so would like private, but If I'm paying for it, I want to ensure I get a therapist who's 'cured' people with Generalised Anxiety Disorder and Social Phobias with a bit of OCD chucked out there for good measure....!

    And I am always self conscious of how people will judge me, I hate awkward silences, but the thing is, because I'm with a good group of friends there is never any awkward silences, and when I'm with close friends I don't seem to care when there's any silent spells as it's never awkward between us if you understand what I'm saying? It sounds so stupid when typing it out, but that's really my thought processes... I also think about how I have wasted a few years of my youth (I'm 19 now, nearly 20) on how I've never wanted to go out, socialise and meet new people, I've preferred to stay in at home, as it's the easiest option isn't it? There's people who are 2 years younger who have more social experience than me... and it eats me up!
    Do you think CBT would be good or not for me? As I've go goals that I want to achieve?

    Thanks man
    I got my CBT treatment through my GP. He recommended me to a private psychiatrist who subsequently recommended me to a private psychotherapist who I do the CBT stuff with, who I still see now. The psychiatrist I saw for about a year but couldn't help me any more after that so I stopped seeing him. To be honest, I think the people I have seen privately have been better than those on the NHS, but that's only because the only person I've seen on the NHS was that useless school psychologist who said I wasn't ill. I don't want to specifically say either way, because to be totally honest, the private people haven't helped me a huge amount either. I think it may be better for you though, because you're over 18 when you're starting treatment. Being under 18 meant I had huge issues getting the treatment I wanted - when I was in psychiatric hospital I was forced to go into the prison-like child's ward which was just horrible. The other children were so lovely, but the nurses weren't and the support and the chance of actually getting any better were dire, so I left after 3 days. And that was private too, and is not something I'd recommend!

    I totally understand about not minding awkward silences when you're with friends, with really close people you can laugh off anything!

    I'm sorry that you feel like you've wasted a few years of socialising and stuff. But there's nothing stopping you starting now! I wouldn't worry about people having more social experience than you - I know that in some ways it feels like you've missed out on all the fun, but at the end of the day you do what you feel like at the time and that's what really matters. Most of my friends go out far more than me but I try to just stay happy with my lot and make the most of when I do go out!

    Have you got anything up your sleeve job/uni wise? (forgive me if you've said already, my memory as I said is up the spout!) You said you've got goals you want to achieve, what sort of things do you have in mind?
    • #24
    #24

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I got my CBT treatment through my GP. He recommended me to a private psychiatrist who subsequently recommended me to a private psychotherapist who I do the CBT stuff with, who I still see now. The psychiatrist I saw for about a year but couldn't help me any more after that so I stopped seeing him. To be honest, I think the people I have seen privately have been better than those on the NHS, but that's only because the only person I've seen on the NHS was that useless school psychologist who said I wasn't ill. I don't want to specifically say either way, because to be totally honest, the private people haven't helped me a huge amount either. I think it may be better for you though, because you're over 18 when you're starting treatment. Being under 18 meant I had huge issues getting the treatment I wanted - when I was in psychiatric hospital I was forced to go into the prison-like child's ward which was just horrible. The other children were so lovely, but the nurses weren't and the support and the chance of actually getting any better were dire, so I left after 3 days. And that was private too, and is not something I'd recommend!

    I totally understand about not minding awkward silences when you're with friends, with really close people you can laugh off anything!

    I'm sorry that you feel like you've wasted a few years of socialising and stuff. But there's nothing stopping you starting now! I wouldn't worry about people having more social experience than you - I know that in some ways it feels like you've missed out on all the fun, but at the end of the day you do what you feel like at the time and that's what really matters. Most of my friends go out far more than me but I try to just stay happy with my lot and make the most of when I do go out!

    Have you got anything up your sleeve job/uni wise? (forgive me if you've said already, my memory as I said is up the spout!) You said you've got goals you want to achieve, what sort of things do you have in mind?
    You went to a psychiatric hospital? Man that sounds really bad, what was it like? What sort of illnesses did the people have who were there? What was bad about the nurses?

    My concern about getting private mental health care is that if I'm paying a lot of my own money for therapy, I want my therapist to be a specialist in treating anxiety like I said.. how can I ensure I get the right therapist?
    • #25
    #25

    Not sure if it'll quote you or not as it doesn't seem to be working properly...

    I went into hospital voluntarily, because frankly I'd tried everything else and nothing had worked and I wasn't getting any better and I thought it was worth a shot. I can't say anything about the other people who were there, it's confidential, but everyone was lovely. Most people were just normal, really, although most had been forced to go there. the nurses were bad because they didn't care about you getting better, you could tell it was their job and you didn't really feel they wanted to be there or help you get better. Because it was the children's ward, they treated you as though you were about 5 years old. I was like, I'm 17 and more than capable of living a normal life, no wonder noone gets better in here. It felt like a child prison!

    I warn you, private health care is really really expensive. If you're a bit short of money I would definitely advise trying the NHS first. To ensure you get the right therapist, go to your GP first and they'll know who to go to.
 
 
 
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