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Msc Finance at Warwick : impressive figures Watch

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    Warwick Msc finance
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    (Original post by kuzelle)
    woop woop// just received the official letter for financial math at Warwick...conditional on getting a first..
    Congratulations!
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    congratulations on the financial mathematics offer. heard from anywhere else?
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    thnx guys.. well i got an offer from edinburgh for financial math as well... but i'l probably reject it... .. haven't heard from ne other place, tho the 8 weeks for my LSE application would be up by the end of this week.. a BIG REJECTIONS on the way..
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    Edinburgh is not as prestigious as Warwick/LSE/Oxbridge I guess? No IB/Hedge fund recruitment on that college?
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    (Original post by John G)
    Edinburgh is not as prestigious as Warwick/LSE/Oxbridge I guess? No IB/Hedge fund recruitment on that college?
    I gues so... the main reasons as to why I applied there was due to its reputation as a prestigous and pretty old uni, because I love edinburgh, and cos its got quite a good maths dept. The Financial Math course is taught in conjunction with Herriott Watt uni, which is well know for its excellence in the feild of actuarial studies.

    I actually read about quite a few of its alumni who have gone on to work as actuaries, which is an area of work I quite enjoy. ....

    But im guesn its Financual Maths course is not the ideal thing for a career in IB/Hedge funds... I gues it is more mathematical than the ones in Warwick and LSE tho... at least thats what I made up by lookn at the course structure...
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    anyway, I asked this question in another thread but since this one seems more active I guess I could repeat it here: Does it matter a lot what your extracurriculars are? Me and a few friends are considering starting an investment club at the university (which currently doesn't have one). I'm thinking that would be a good thing on your CV. If I had that on my CV (co-founder of investment club) + five references (two from finance teachers, the rest economics) + a degree in finance/economics with a business minor + being a board member of a political society + somewhere between 65-70 %.... might I have a shot at admission to some decent school then? I go to a non-target school btw (top #5 in Ireland so not too bad, but not exactly Oxbridge).

    By decent school, I mean Warwick, Oxbridge, LSE, Imperial... you name it. Edinburgh could be an option too of course. But you get what I mean; some place with decent on campus recruitment.
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    (Original post by John G)
    anyway, I asked this question in another thread but since this one seems more active I guess I could repeat it here: Does it matter a lot what your extracurriculars are? Me and a few friends are considering starting an investment club at the university (which currently doesn't have one). I'm thinking that would be a good thing on your CV. If I had that on my CV (co-founder of investment club) + five references (two from finance teachers, the rest economics) + a degree in finance/economics with a business minor + being a board member of a political society + somewhere between 65-70 %.... might I have a shot at admission to some decent school then? I go to a non-target school btw (top #5 in Ireland so not too bad, but not exactly Oxbridge).

    By decent school, I mean Warwick, Oxbridge, LSE, Imperial... you name it. Edinburgh could be an option too of course. But you get what I mean; some place with decent on campus recruitment.
    well first up you need just 2/3 references, so ur better off, picking the best ones as good refernces can make a huge difference.. Secondly I have heard that work experience does help boost up ur chances when applying to most uni's.. Also write a killer personal statement, where you try to show off ur extra culliculars.

    The Finance related courses at LSE and Oxbridge are extremely competitive, so its always better to have a first class, but its always worth a try.. U definitely have a chance of getn into imperial, Warwick, etc.. After all what most of the top schools look for are good grades, good references, and a killer personal statement (thus the more extra culli's and interships u do, the chances of writin a good P.S would be higher)... hope this helps.. xD
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    You know, LSE has a programme in Finance and private equity. Since it is less known than the regular finance program, I'm thinking it could be slightly less competitive (although it's never easy to get into LSE).

    I am going to write an undergraduate thesis (mandatory part of the program). I'm thinking writing it about Private equity (I have already checked with my teacher and he said it's possible) may increase my chances. I actually called the program co-ordinator and he said that the most important things were a good 2.1 and that I could prove I had an intensive interest in private equity which goes a long way back in time. Incidentally, I have a teacher who can certify that I am interested in PE/VC.

    I am of course interested in other programs too, not just the one at LSE. I actually think it's much more likely I end up in Warwick, which I would be perfectly happy with.

    I can definitely get a first in my third year. In my second year, I think I blew my chances because this exam period didn't really go very well The interesting thing is that even in those courses where my exams didn't go very well, the teachers have agreed to remain as references because, as one of them put it, "I am aware of the ability that you have". Maybe if you have a teacher who can confirm that you're a lot better than the exam says, they'll take their word for it? I'm also thinking advanced courses should matter more than introductory. Like, I had an introductory course in corporate finance where I dominated every class and did extremely well, right up until the exam when I ran out of time. The teacher understood and is therefore still my reference. Thing is, I have another course in corporate finance this semester. If I do really well in this, slightly more advanced corporate finance course, do you think a university may "tolerate" the fact that my grades in the introductory course are less than stellar (I haven't gotten them yet so I can't give you a number)?

    /John
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    (Original post by John G)
    You know, LSE has a programme in Finance and private equity. Since it is less known than the regular finance program, I'm thinking it could be slightly less competitive (although it's never easy to get into LSE).

    I am going to write an undergraduate thesis (mandatory part of the program). I'm thinking writing it about Private equity (I have already checked with my teacher and he said it's possible) may increase my chances. I actually called the program co-ordinator and he said that the most important things were a good 2.1 and that I could prove I had an intensive interest in private equity which goes a long way back in time. Incidentally, I have a teacher who can certify that I am interested in PE/VC.

    I am of course interested in other programs too, not just the one at LSE. I actually think it's much more likely I end up in Warwick, which I would be perfectly happy with.

    I can definitely get a first in my third year. In my second year, I think I blew my chances because this exam period didn't really go very well The interesting thing is that even in those courses where my exams didn't go very well, the teachers have agreed to remain as references because, as one of them put it, "I am aware of the ability that you have". Maybe if you have a teacher who can confirm that you're a lot better than the exam says, they'll take their word for it? I'm also thinking advanced courses should matter more than introductory. Like, I had an introductory course in corporate finance where I dominated every class and did extremely well, right up until the exam when I ran out of time. The teacher understood and is therefore still my reference. Thing is, I have another course in corporate finance this semester. If I do really well in this, slightly more advanced corporate finance course, do you think a university may "tolerate" the fact that my grades in the introductory course are less than stellar (I haven't gotten them yet so I can't give you a number)?

    /John

    Whats your profile i.e. do you have any internships and stuff of that sort? I imagine the students applying to that course will have investment banking/private equity/venture capital internships.
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    Is durham any good for msc finance? Where do people normally end up afterwards?

    And generally, is msc finance something that is usually done straight after undergrad or after 1-2 years of working?
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    Nope, no internships unfortunately. They are hard to come by in Ireland (not because I haven't tried). I don't know if work experience is expected to be honest, it doesn't say a word about it on their website (but then maybe it's just me not being so good at reading between the lines). They did tell me for a fact that you don't need experience in PE, just something that proves you are interested in it. It may be easier to prove that you're interested in PE if you have or have had a job in IB (you could talk about how you think PE is the next natural step - a not-too-hard story to tell).
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    (Original post by John G)
    Nope, no internships unfortunately. They are hard to come by in Ireland (not because I haven't tried). I don't know if work experience is expected to be honest, it doesn't say a word about it on their website (but then maybe it's just me not being so good at reading between the lines). They did tell me for a fact that you don't need experience in PE, just something that proves you are interested in it. It may be easier to prove that you're interested in PE if you have or have had a job in IB (you could talk about how you think PE is the next natural step - a not-too-hard story to tell).
    I'm sure a lot of the students don't have prior internships, but it makes getting an offer easier. If you don't have any internships or special extra curriculars you would need very strong academics i.e. a good First.
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    As I said, I'm about to found an investment club at university (together with two other guys but still). That ought to make me stand out a little, right?

    Also, I may get an internship this summer, only it won't be in finance (I could be volunteering full time for a political campaign). I guess I could still mention it though. My dilemma is that Irish banks have collapsed, and taking in interns is not their first priority. In my home country, an education from an Irish university simply doesn't have the same ring to it as an education from Stockholm School of Economics does.
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    (Original post by John G)
    As I said, I'm about to found an investment club at university (together with two other guys but still). That ought to make me stand out a little, right?

    Also, I may get an internship this summer, only it won't be in finance (I could be volunteering full time for a political campaign). I guess I could still mention it though. My dilemma is that Irish banks have collapsed, and taking in interns is not their first priority. In my home country, an education from an Irish university simply doesn't have the same ring to it as an education from Stockholm School of Economics does.
    An investment club or the likes is impressive if corporate companies sponsor you such as ibanks and you do worthwhile stuff like organising a finance conference. If you meet up once a week to discuss finance issues then its not worth it. Are you Irish or Swedish?
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    I'm Swedish. Thanks for the advice on the IC, we plan to put together a, do some investing together and stuff like that probably (of course we'll discuss finance too but that won't be all of it). We just started to we haven't got everything clear yet. I imagine it can't be a negative anyway.

    You mention a finance conference. What do you do on such a conference? Just curious.
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    (Original post by John G)
    I'm Swedish. Thanks for the advice on the IC, we plan to put together a, do some investing together and stuff like that probably (of course we'll discuss finance too but that won't be all of it). We just started to we haven't got everything clear yet. I imagine it can't be a negative anyway.

    You mention a finance conference. What do you do on such a conference? Just curious.
    google lse aic. there are also other ones, but you'll have to visit each universities finance soc site.
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    Okay, thanks for the advice. I do have a bad feeling about this after the exams; it seems like I always fail when I have to succeed. I freaking dominated every finance class for the past semester, but then I ran out of time during the exam. It's been almost a week but I still can't get over it

    If you do well (think, first class) in your third year but not so well in your second, can you then still get admitted to a program straight out of undergrad? Let me explain: At the time when you apply for an MSc in most cases, you just have your second year results. I won't get my third year results before the end of june 2012, but I'll have to apply october this year. Most programs I guess you have to apply early to have a chance, and so most of them will be full by the time I get my third year grades.

    So, could I apply on my second year grades, get rejected (that risk is substantial) and then apply again in late june 2012 and ask them to reconsider? Or would I have to wait and not do a master's degree until 2013? Could I get an offer, on the condition that I improve my grades (ie get a first)?

    I'm sorry I'm asking so many questions. I'm really eager to do a master's and I feel pretty clueless to be honest (well, I guess you've already figured that out).
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    (Original post by John G)
    Okay, thanks for the advice. I do have a bad feeling about this after the exams; it seems like I always fail when I have to succeed. I freaking dominated every finance class for the past semester, but then I ran out of time during the exam. It's been almost a week but I still can't get over it

    If you do well (think, first class) in your third year but not so well in your second, can you then still get admitted to a program straight out of undergrad? Let me explain: At the time when you apply for an MSc in most cases, you just have your second year results. I won't get my third year results before the end of june 2012, but I'll have to apply october this year. Most programs I guess you have to apply early to have a chance, and so most of them will be full by the time I get my third year grades.

    So, could I apply on my second year grades, get rejected (that risk is substantial) and then apply again in late june 2012 and ask them to reconsider? Or would I have to wait and not do a master's degree until 2013? Could I get an offer, on the condition that I improve my grades (ie get a first)?

    I'm sorry I'm asking so many questions. I'm really eager to do a master's and I feel pretty clueless to be honest (well, I guess you've already figured that out).
    You can apply for the September 2011 intake, and if you get rejected you can again apply for the 2012 intake as long as something has changed on your CV in the mean time (like a First instead of whatever grade you have when you apply for the September 2011 intake, or an internship etc).
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    I assume you mean apply for september 2012 intake. Look, I'm in second year right now, I graduate in 2012. What I am asking is; even if my second year grades aren't good enough, could I still be admitted to a program starting fall 2012 if my third year grades are good?

    Thanks for your help
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    (Original post by John G)
    I assume you mean apply for september 2012 intake. Look, I'm in second year right now, I graduate in 2012. What I am asking is; even if my second year grades aren't good enough, could I still be admitted to a program starting fall 2012 if my third year grades are good?

    Thanks for your help
    Ask me in June after you get your second year grades. No point discussing hypothetical situations.
 
 
 
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