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How much do you pay your parents a month? Watch

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    HAHAHA!
    pay to LIVE AT HOME?!
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    (Original post by RIISE)
    Well, I find it unfair to not pay, as a University student you are an adult and should be responsible for paying your way. Anyway you get student finance so what you want all that too yourself? Very selfish.

    That's not to everyone, just the ignorant ones.
    Most people don't have any student finance help left after termly rent costs and tuition fees. As to whether it's fair or not, I suppose it depends on the parents, but if I was a parent I wouldn't want my child to have to get a job at Uni, so I wouldn't accept it unless I really needed it.

    Sorry, that wasn't really your point... I'd say £400 a month is what you'd pay in the real world, so if your family chooses to do it that way £200 sounds very fair.
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    My mother says if I choose to stay at home, she won't make me pay rent. She just really doesn't want me to move out though, so she's kind of bribing me to stay by saying I don't need to pay!
    I see no problem with it. To be honest, I don't understand why your family would want you to pay to live at home, don't they do it out of love?
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    it's a dumb idea and only white folk do it

    if there is such an impetus to 'pay your own way' in life, then why don't they refuse the rent and say "you know what, take this money and put it towards the deposit of your house of the future"

    by asking for rent you aren't doing anyone any favours
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    It was £200 a month; but they owe me money. I will be living rent free (mid-May I think) until that's been paid off.
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    C'mon guys you're being a little unfair. When you reach 20 your parents can no longer receive child tax credits and if you're working full time they could lose out on income support, rent rebate or some other types of benefits they'd receive if they kicked you out. So it's not just the extra bit of food and electric that they'll be paying for by keeping you at home.

    £200 a month is a bargain or you could always pay around £300 a month for a tiny unfurnished studio that doesn't come with food or your own cook and cleaner.
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    I currently pay £100 a month using only student bursary/loan. When I was employed full-time, and if I'm still living here when I am employed full-time in the future, I paid (will pay) around £250 per month.

    I thought it was pretty much common sense to pay for rent since I left school. Living with a single mother who earns minimum wage, and considering it's me who uses most of the amenities above the cost of the house - tv/broadband, electricity, food etc - it would be unfair to just sit and let my mother struggle while I accumulate money.
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    Am currently unemployed, so I can't afford to pay anything. I would contribute something if I was working full time.
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    My friend who'll just be 18 will have to pay rent to his parents when his summer job starts again in the easter hols !!!!!!!!!!!!

    I don't think my parents would accept rent off me. Although to be fair I do; fill and empty the dishwasher, feed the dog, walk the dog at weekends, set and clear the table for meals, make almost all of my meals, help with the shopping and putting it away, help clean and tidy when we've got guests coming . . .
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    (Original post by -2D-)
    my parents say that they'll pay for my first house after uni if I live near to them
    That really has no relevance whatsoever :erm:

    I pay £140 a month.
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    (Original post by lausa22)
    My mother says if I choose to stay at home, she won't make me pay rent. She just really doesn't want me to move out though, so she's kind of bribing me to stay by saying I don't need to pay!
    I see no problem with it. To be honest, I don't understand why your family would want you to pay to live at home, don't they do it out of love?
    I think you're missing the point. I bet there are a lot of parents who wouldn't make their child pay rent if they could afford it but in this economic state, chances are they can't afford to to do it "for love"
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      I didn't pay anything during my gap yah, and neither did anyone else I know. My mother still pays for my phone bills etc.
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      I don't pay my parents anything
      but they spend £5000 a term on my school fees
      See the thing is here
      I am filthy stinking rich and my parents have so much money that they actually do not know what to do with it all!
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      My parents don't need the rent but it's a question of values.
      You're an adult, you must know living isn't free and working is mandatory if you want to sleep indoors.

      I plan to pay them rent when I move back home and move out asap, I never take money from them either. I'm an adult now, what would you think of your parents if they took money from your grandparents now?
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      (Original post by Beebumble)
      if you're working full time they could lose out on income support.
      Not true. They would only lose out on income support if their income or their partners income is too high.
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      Nothing. My patents never asked for money off my older brothers when they lived at home either.

      My friends in full time jobs who live at home pay about £100 a month I think.
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      Wtf? It might be reasonable for them to ask you to pay for your own food and a proportion of the utility bills, but rent? Really?
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      £200 a month. My brother does anyway, I'm still in college. I think its fair to charge for food and a bit of the gas/electricity but when you've paid off your mortgage like my parents its a bit stingey.
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        £100 for rent plus i pay for the food shopping :ninjagirl:
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        (Original post by sarahthegemini)
        I think you're missing the point. I bet there are a lot of parents who wouldn't make their child pay rent if they could afford it but in this economic state, chances are they can't afford to to do it "for love"
        Does this mean that they would get in some random lodger otherwise? Or is the rent supposed to cover the cost of food and utilities that you incur?
       
       
       
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