Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Does anyone really like Shakespeare? And if so, which is your favourite? Watch

    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I'm really not into literature or plays or anything like that, and I hated English at school so that might have something to do with it. It's nothing personal against Shakespeare, I just find enjoyment in other things :P
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kgooding)
    So, wanting to be a literature student, I've had to read Shakespeare, and write about Shakespeare, and learn about him, pretend to like some of his things, analyse them to the point of breakdown and basically know everything there is to know about certain works.
    Now I love The Taming of the Shrew. I also love the film with Elizabeth Taylor but that's not the point.
    I hate, as in absolutely detest, Romeo and Juliet. The films are OK but the written play, I hate it. I also don't really like A Midsummer's Night Dream, but remember this is only my opinion.
    So, as the title says, do you like Shakespeare? And if so, what do you like? His sonnets, his plays, what?
    Sounds like you ought to be a film student, not a literature student. Literature involves the written word, some of it takes some work to digest, understand and appreciate.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I study Literature A level and I hate Shakespeare. Don't. Just don't.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    [...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    In my school, I've studied Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's dream. The language is quite confusing at times, I must admit, but the plots are good as a whole, I think!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I think his work is largely irrelevant,

    It's not in current English, the plots are hardly breathtaking, and dissecting his work for 'meaning' is a colossal waste of time given that his primary motivation would have been money and royal favour.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Barden)
    I think his work is largely irrelevant,

    It's not in current English, the plots are hardly breathtaking, and dissecting his work for 'meaning' is a colossal waste of time given that his primary motivation would have been money and royal favour.
    This is superb trolling !I initially composed a response, then realised Barden is a genius!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alibongo)
    This is superb trolling !I initially composed a response, then realised Barden is a genius!
    come on, let's hear your response


    convince me that Shakespeare is worth my time...
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Thatstudentdude)
    I really hate reading Shakespeare's works. I don't enjoy any of them. Agree with other posts that plays are meant to be watched, not read.

    The first question I asked my new teacher at the start of the A2 year was 'Are we doing Shakespeare' as I was already filled with dread...I literally cheered in my seat when she told me we weren't, we were going to be doing 'The White Devil' by John Webster in place of Shakespeare text.
    Why is specifically Webster OK? It's all Elizabethan/Jacobean drama. The plays have always been read as well as watched: why else would they be circulated in manuscript form? Why else would something like the first folio be published?
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Barden)
    I think his work is largely irrelevant,

    It's not in current English, the plots are hardly breathtaking, and dissecting his work for 'meaning' is a colossal waste of time given that his primary motivation would have been money and royal favour.
    1) So?

    2) So? Who gives a crap about plot? "Woooo! Events in sequence!!!"

    3) Nobody looks for 'meaning'. What people look for are effects, ideas, dramaturgy, that sort of thing. None of these are compromised by the possibility that Shakespeare only wrote for personal gain.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TritonSails)
    1) So?

    2) So? Who gives a crap about plot? "Woooo! Events in sequence!!!"

    3) Nobody looks for 'meaning'. What people look for are effects, ideas, dramaturgy, that sort of thing. None of these are compromised by the possibility that Shakespeare only wrote for personal gain.
    1 - Lack of educational value and diversion away from useful material.

    2 - Therefore its boring, and if its not educational or interesting, what's the point?

    3 - All one does in school when it comes to Shakespeare is slave away as to what he meant in the linguistic sense (i.e. translating it into modern English) and what he meant in the literary sense. Are you honestly telling me that your English lessons didn't mostly talk about 'imagery' and "what he meant by x"? Never once was I even presented with the notion that maybe, just maybe, Shakespeare wanted to sell tickets. Of course this compromises the depth of his work, as it assumes that something very simple must have greater depth when it probably doesn't :dontknow: (think Occum's Razor).
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Barden)
    1 - Lack of educational value and diversion away from useful material.

    2 - Therefore its boring, and if its not educational or interesting, what's the point?

    3 - All one does in school when it comes to Shakespeare is slave away as to what he meant in the linguistic sense (i.e. translating it into modern English) and what he meant in the literary sense. Are you honestly telling me that your English lessons didn't mostly talk about 'imagery' and "what he meant by x"? Never once was I even presented with the notion that maybe, just maybe, Shakespeare wanted to sell tickets. Of course this compromises the depth of his work, as it assumes that something very simple must have greater depth when it probably doesn't :dontknow: (think Occum's Razor).
    1) So there's nothing educational about studying how Early Modern English was written and spoken?

    2) There are more important things than plot. I really don't see why his plots are 'worse' than any other writer's.

    3) Maybe it isn't taught very well in school, but you're clearly referring to it being taught at a pretty basic level. Even at A Level it is pretty decently taught and made interesting--imagery is an important part of how everyone speaks, not just Shakespeare's characters, and 'meaning' is something that bad English students talk about and assume teachers do too but actually isn't something that critics really look for in texts (besides the kind of glossing you're talking about where you need to make sure everyone actually understands what characters are saying). There is plenty of evidence that Shakspeare both took pride in his work as an artist and needed to ensure an income--otherwise why would he write things like Venus and Adonis or The Rape of Lucrece both of which, being mini-epic poems, groundlings would have little interest in? It's incredibly reductive to say firstly that Shakespeare was only interested in money and that secondly because of this none of his work is worth thinking about. Have you considered that all of the effects and uses of language and ideas that I'm talking about might be the very reason why he was successful financially? He had a financial incentive to write good plays, and part of what we do in English is think about how those plays are so good and why they were so financially successful..
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TritonSails)
    1) So there's nothing educational about studying how Early Modern English was written and spoken?
    Not when the aim is to teach the correct usage of contemporary English, no.

    Save it for history and/or linguistics.

    2) There are more important things than plot. I really don't see why his plots are 'worse' than any other writer's.
    I didn't say they were bad, Just not good enough to be fawned over like they are...

    3) Maybe it isn't taught very well in school, but you're clearly referring to it being taught at a pretty basic level. Even at A Level it is pretty decently taught and made interesting--imagery is an important part of how everyone speaks, not just Shakespeare's characters, and 'meaning' is something that bad English students talk about and assume teachers do too but actually isn't something that critics really look for in texts (besides the kind of glossing you're talking about where you need to make sure everyone actually understands what characters are saying). There is plenty of evidence that Shakspeare both took pride in his work as an artist and needed to ensure an income--otherwise why would he write things like Venus and Adonis or The Rape of Lucrece both of which, being mini-epic poems, groundlings would have little interest in? It's incredibly reductive to say firstly that Shakespeare was only interested in money and that secondly because of this none of his work is worth thinking about. Have you considered that all of the effects and uses of language and ideas that I'm talking about might be the very reason why he was successful financially? He had a financial incentive to write good plays, and part of what we do in English is think about how those plays are so good and why they were so financially successful..
    I'll admit that you make a valid point. But regardless, I still feel that money was probably a far larger factor than his artistic pride, and that therefore Shakespeare's works are given far more attention than they deserve.

    This thread wouldn't exist if Shakespearean literature wasn't loathed by many, many people. That in itself shows that his plays aren't that great.

    Just for the record, I hold the same reductive attitude towards English literature as a subject, to be honest. Authors write to get paid, let's just enjoy the stories and GTFO.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Study Helper
    I love-love-love-love SHAKESPEARE!! Absolutely amazing! But I do prefer his plays than his poetry, but I'm not a fan of poetry in general to be honest.

    I love Romeo and Juliet, MacBeth and The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing and Coriolanus too! I shall be reading King Lear and Othello two weeks from now, I'm super excited!

    Also, ya'll should check out the new 2013 film for Romeo and Juliet. I almost had to be put on life support after seeing the advert. It looks absolutely beautiful!!

    I detest the plays Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest.

    And pretty much hate all his poetry if I'm honest!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alibongo)
    Sounds like you ought to be a film student, not a literature student. Literature involves the written word, some of it takes some work to digest, understand and appreciate.
    I have read the works and I love them, but I also watch the films in order to watch adaptions and contrasting ideas. I take literature. I love literature. I have so many books I need a new bookcase so please, don't think I'm being a cow, but I am a literature student.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Othello is a favourite of mine too. I think many of his plays have some interesting features of them too. As much as Macbeth, as a play is, in my opinion, pretty tedious, some of the language in it is quite beautiful.

    'Life is but a shadow'
    'Look like the innocent flower, but be the serpent under't'
    'Nought's had, all's spent, better be those that we destroy, than by destruction dwell in doubtful joy'

    Something like that anyway. But Othello is awesome, well Iago is anyway. I especially love Kenneth Branagh's portrayal of Iago.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Romeo and Juliet is appalling. Really bad. However, it isn't in a genre I like, love and all that balls, so maybe it's not the play itself but the subject it is covering.

    Hamlet however, is the dog's *******s. Superb stuff.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I like them, but I think to really appreciate and love them you have to study them and completely surround yourself in them. Gotta love a bit of ol shakey!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have not read too much Shakespeare, but my favourite is Othello, I loved the story and Iago the main antagonist is brilliant.

    I have seen the hollow crown series on the BBC and really loved that, I don't know how close the series is to the actual plays but it was brilliant, in particular Richard II.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    I love Shakespeare, my favourite was Richard II as I saw a really good production of it, but the Hollow Crown version sort of ruined it for me. Henry V and Hamlet are now holding joint first place.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.