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Has anyone ever tried homeopathy? Watch

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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Does it work?

    Thanks.
    No.

    Doing a few sums involving Avogadro's number soon shows you that you're just ingesting water.


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    Tom
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Please find me the victims. Please find me people who are not entirely satisfied with the way they have spent their own money.

    I have the pdf of the finding on the Dingle case actually.
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  1. File Type: pdf dingle_finding.pdf (546.1 KB, 33 views)
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    No, it has no basis in science - HOWEVER, if you are taking normal medication ALONG side it, I don't see the harm (other than monetary) in the potential benefit from any placebo effect it may have?

    Otherwise, don't bother.
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    (Original post by Smaug123)
    As, for instance, the person who wrote what I linked above did: http://www.abc.net.au/austory/content/2011/s3260776.htm
    You are basing this all on a single case where the coroner's verdict laid much more stress on her responsibility for her actions and where the correspondence you cite contains not a single reference to the activities of her husband who was peddling his very own line of pseudo-science.

    The reality is that millions of people around the world are entirely happy with their sugar pills and it would be wholly wrong to interfere with that.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The reality is that millions of people around the world are entirely happy with their sugar pills and it would be wholly wrong to interfere with that.
    You don't see the more general harm in encouraging scientific illiteracy and magical thinking? Or what about the consumer protection angle?
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    (Original post by AdvanceAndVanquish)
    You don't see the more general harm in encouraging scientific illiteracy and magical thinking?
    No, I think it is a free country

    Or what about the consumer protection angle?
    As I posted earlier, if there were significant numbers of victims of this, as with mis-sold insurance policies, then I might be persuaded but what we have is the case of one woman in Australia married to someone who peddled pseudo-science for a living who also happened to have chosen some very questionable treatments from real doctors rather than have conventional cancer surgery. It is a very sad case, but not one so as to deprive millions of people of the comfort and placebo benefits that they receive from these "treatments".
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Please find me the victims. Please find me people who are not entirely satisfied with the way they have spent their own money.
    Unless I'm misremembering, the NHS spends about £4mil a year on homeopathy. Whilst this is minimal compared to the total NHS bill, as taxpayers I think we have a right to be less than happy about that.
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    (Original post by Slumpy)
    Unless I'm misremembering, the NHS spends about £4mil a year on homeopathy. Whilst this is minimal compared to the total NHS bill, as taxpayers I think we have a right to be less than happy about that.
    And how much do they spend on antibiotics to treat viruses?
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    And how much do they spend on antibiotics to treat viruses?
    Many orders more than that, I should hope. Likely also too much admittedly.
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    (Original post by Slumpy)
    Many orders more than that, I should hope. Likely also too much admittedly.
    You do appreciate that an antibiotic is as pharmacologically effective on a virus as a heavily diluted rainbow http://www.ainsworths.com is on anything.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    You do appreciate that an antibiotic is as pharmacologically effective on a virus as a heavily diluted rainbow http://www.ainsworths.com is on anything.
    Doh, that will teach me to actually read what I'm replying to. Indeed, if anything is being spent on antiviral antibiotics (which, the name hints, would not be the case), this is too much. However, antibiotics in general are rather worthwhile.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    It's not just tap water, there are dilutions in it. Very minute dilutions, but they are still there.
    So minute that there's as much of the last ****e you flushed away as there is the 'active ingredient'.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    So minute that there's as much of the last ****e you flushed away as there is the 'active ingredient'.
    Indeed, it's like buying a lottery ticket. The chance that you'll get what you're looking for is so unlikely, there's no point. But you feel "I almost won, if I get another I'll win the jackpot" (the placebo).
    Only, there's probably more chance of winning the lottery than getting the actual "active ingredient" in your dose.


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    (Original post by ash92:))
    Indeed, it's like buying a lottery ticket. The chance that you'll get what you're looking for is so unlikely, there's no point. But you feel "I almost won, if I get another I'll win the jackpot" (the placebo).
    Only, there's probably more chance of winning the lottery than getting the actual "active ingredient" in your dose.
    By definition there is. You have to be in it to win it
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    And how much do they spend on antibiotics to treat viruses?
    As little as possible. Doctors can get in serious trouble for misuse of antibiotics now.
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    (Original post by ash92:))
    Indeed, it's like buying a lottery ticket. The chance that you'll get what you're looking for is so unlikely, there's no point. But you feel "I almost won, if I get another I'll win the jackpot" (the placebo).
    Only, there's probably more chance of winning the lottery than getting the actual "active ingredient" in your dose.


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    There's more chance of winning the lottery every week for a year than finding one molecule from the C200 flu remedy in a litre of water.
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    What worse is the ideology behind the "medicine". If X causes Y symptom, they think X may also be a cure for Y if it's in minute amounts.
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    There's more chance of winning the lottery every week for a year than finding one molecule from the C200 flu remedy in a litre of water.
    This.


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    Tom
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    (Original post by ash92:))
    What worse is the ideology behind the "medicine". If X causes Y symptom, they think X may also be a cure for Y if it's in minute amounts.
    Try it with polonium. You can be fairly sure of killing an 80kg man with 6.6 micrograms (a dust like speck) if you can get them to ingest it.
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    Try it with polonium. You can be fairly sure of killing an 80kg man with 6.6 micrograms (a dust like speck) if you can get them to ingest it.
    Phew! Thank goodness I'm 100kg!


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    Tom
 
 
 
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