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    (Original post by AmyAintDead)
    Hey, may I just say, I have a really close friend with Aspergers and he has come along in leaps and bounds. He's gone from not socialising away from his best friend, to randomly gaining friends without his best friend, has had relationships and even has gone on to complete his Drama GCSE among other great things. He's now our resident tea maker in the sixth form room, too!

    Honestly, it's all about practice to sort of help you out. Of course it doesn't get rid of the Aspergers but it certainly helps along with it. If it wasn't for my friend taking Drama GCSE and his best friend moving to a different school, he wouldn't have come out of his shell at all by A-Level.

    Best of luck!
    I strongly believe that if you are capable enough to form a relationship with someone then you don't have asperger's syndrome unless you're a female because it's so easy for females to form relationships compared to males. Aspergers is all about struggling to socially communicate with others and forming relationships with the opposite sex requires a ton of social communication skills especially if you're a male so you cannot have aspergers and must have been misdiagnosed.
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    (Original post by WGR)
    I strongly believe that if you are capable enough to form a relationship with someone then you don't have asperger's syndrome unless you're a female because it's so easy for females to form relationships compared to males. Aspergers is all about struggling to socially communicate with others and forming relationships with the opposite sex requires a ton of social communication skills especially if you're a male so you cannot have aspergers and must have been misdiagnosed.
    I disagree. I have a male friend who is married and quite clearly on the spectrum due to the way he acts. From what he's said about past relationships, he's really struggled.

    He also said he fakes his confidence, etc.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    I swear you just want to have Aspergers. Although, why you'd want it, is a mystery.
    I don't want it :sigh: I have already explained why I want to be diagnosed.

    (Original post by nopenopenope)
    well that was expected

    Your Aspie score: 143 of 200

    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 60 of 200
    You are very likely an Aspie

    I got similar scores. It said I was very likely an Aspie too.
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    (Original post by Bassetts)
    I don't want it :sigh: I have already explained why I want to be diagnosed.

    I got similar scores. It said I was very likely an Aspie too.
    go to a doctor mang

    don't go in there saying i think i have aspergers tho

    tell them what your problem is, they will refer you or tell you you're okay, if they refer you (expect a massive delay), you'll get further testing and **** and then you might get a diagnosis
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    (Original post by WGR)
    Self diagnosed autists; is there anyone more irritating?
    Just because I'm self diagnosed doesn't mean I wear it as a badge or that I was the first to apply the term to myself.

    When I was about 15 someone else applied the term to me, I looked it up and found that it really explained how I related to the world. I didn't want to self diagnose, though, due to the attitudes of people like you. When I was 17 or so someone else said it again and I had another look at it and began to accept it, and it has really helped me to understand how I relate to the world and why I feel the way I do. I don't tell people, and I don't use it as a crutch - so why do you have a problem?
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    (Original post by RibenaRockstar)
    Just because I'm self diagnosed doesn't mean I wear it as a badge or that I was the first to apply the term to myself.

    When I was about 15 someone else applied the term to me, I looked it up and found that it really explained how I related to the world. I didn't want to self diagnose, though, due to the attitudes of people like you. When I was 17 or so someone else said it again and I had another look at it and began to accept it, and it has really helped me to understand how I relate to the world and why I feel the way I do. I don't tell people, and I don't use it as a crutch - so why do you have a problem?
    Why would you say you have something when you don't have a diagnosis? That's the problem. You don't know if you have it. It could be something else with similar symptoms.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Why would you say you have something when you don't have a diagnosis? That's the problem. You don't know if you have it. It could be something else with similar symptoms.
    I'm 90% sure I have it to at least some extent - and why would it matter if I don't, if all I'm using to for is to help myself rationalise what's going on around me?!
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    life eh...
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Why would you say you have something when you don't have a diagnosis? That's the problem. You don't know if you have it. It could be something else with similar symptoms.
    What 'something else' could that be?
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    (Original post by Bassetts)
    What 'something else' could that be?
    (Social) anxiety, maybe?
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    (Social) anxiety, maybe?
    that's a possibility
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    (Original post by Mrx123)
    that's a possibility
    I was once told by someone not trained to diagnose people, that's what I have. No-one else has ever suggested social anxiety. Depression and OCD, yes.
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    (Original post by Bassetts)
    What 'something else' could that be?
    Social anxiety, anxiety, avoidant personality disorder.... Anything really. The stuff you mentioned is mainly anxiety issues. Do you have problems with hypersensitive hearing? motor problems with speech? etc?
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    (Original post by Michaelj)
    Social anxiety, anxiety, avoidant personality disorder.... Anything really. The stuff you mentioned is mainly anxiety issues. Do you have problems with hypersensitive hearing? motor problems with speech? etc?
    Hypo and hypersenstivity aren't part of the criteria. My brother has no such issues and has Aspergers. I do have issues with hypo and hypersenstivity; but at least two have nothing to do with my Autism.
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    Anyway, you don't have to fulfill all the criteria, or? That's why at the end they allways have the "doesn't meet other critiria, but clearly is different in that way"-diagnosis. (Yeah, very simply putted down, i know.)

    But I agree, it can be other things, too.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Why would you say you have something when you don't have a diagnosis? That's the problem. You don't know if you have it. It could be something else with similar symptoms.
    This isn't intended as any kind of confrontation - it seems that I am missing some information, and this is me asking for that information, rather than me saying "You are wrong". As disclosure, I am studying maths at Cambridge, and am therefore very unlikely to be neurotypical; I used to think of myself as very mildly Aspie (with much the same reasoning as RibenaRockstar above), but with some effort and concerted practice I have learnt enough about group interaction for lots of it to become unconscious.

    I will use "aspie" for "autistic/Aspie" throughout (it's easier to type).

    The main source of my confusion is that I think that "being diagnosed as aspie doesn't cause you to be clinically treated differently".

    I'm going to draw an analogy between "passed the Aspie test" and "scored highly on an IQ test". If I pass the Aspie test, that is (according to you) a necessary and sufficient condition for me to be aspie. As far as I can tell, there is no difference at all between that statement and the statement that "scoring highly on an IQ test is necessary and sufficient to be intelligent". That statement is false (you can simply not take an IQ test and still be intelligent).

    Because I don't know of any "cure" for Asperger's/autism, I therefore don't know of any way one is treated differently after passing the Aspie test. You don't suddenly know that "ah, that's why I'm socially anxious!" - you knew that already. It's like saying (on having an IQ of 160) "ah, that's why I'm quicker at finding puns than other people!" - it's not, because "IQ 160" is not an explanation of why you are intelligent, but a statement that you are intelligent. Similarly, "passed the Aspie test" is not an explanation of why you have aspie traits, but a statement that you do, and hence it doesn't tell you anything new. If we were aware of something that is reliably different between the brains of people-who-pass-the-Aspie-test and neurotypicals, and if formal diagnosis involved identifying whether or not one has that physical difference, then I would be much more inclined to believe you. (For instance, this is why I accept cancer tests in this sense - because beforehand, one didn't know what to do, and afterwards, one does, namely "get treated in the way that has some success in treating cancer".)

    In case I've focused on the wrong thing, the other source of confusion I can see is that you assert "no self-diagnosis is valid". But there has to be some kind of self-diagnosis before you are medically diagnosed (otherwise, why would you bother being medically diagnosed, besides being interested and bored one day?)

    I would be very interested to know what I don't know here (the main useful thing would either be a physical, testable difference between aspies and neurotypicals which correlates heavily with Aspie tests).
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    (Original post by Smaug123)
    As disclosure, I am studying maths at Cambridge, and am therefore very unlikely to be neurotypical.
    Excuse me that I have to interfer: WHY? Why are so many people assuming you need to be different to like math? Is it not more the perception of society and the wrong wording of Aspie questions in addition to a very narrow minded view of Aspergers, that makes Math students (I really don't know, why Cambridge Math students should be different, there is no reason for that.) score highly on the tests, although they are the same as everybody else? There is a big difference if you are fascinated by number theory or you just love the number 1 or you like your job, involving dealing with a lot of numbers. Aspergers may mean you persue an interest with much more focus and dedication, not that you have an interest. (Especially looking at the girls Asperger traits vs. Boys Aspergers trait discussion, etc.)

    You probably mean this survey: http://docs.autismresearchcentre.com...etal_maths.pdf ??? The percentage doesn't seem to imply you are likely to have autism, just that it is higher than for others. But even then they speak of a percentage of 1,85%. That's means you are very likely not.
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    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    Anyway, you don't have to fulfill all the criteria, or? That's why at the end they allways have the "doesn't meet other critiria, but clearly is different in that way"-diagnosis. (Yeah, very simply putted down, i know.)

    But I agree, it can be other things, too.
    You don't need to meet all the criteria, no, Did come across someone who was refused a diagnosis because she doesn't lack empathy.:rolleyes: From what she said, she meets all the other criteria, or enough to be on the spectrum somewhere.

    As disclosure, I am studying maths at Cambridge, and am therefore very unlikely to be neurotypical;
    I know a neurotypical with a degree in maths and computer science from Oxford. The maths thing is a myth. Not all people on the spectrum are good at maths.

    If I pass the Aspie test, that is (according to you) a necessary and sufficient condition for me to be aspie.
    It's not. It could mean you have other similar conditions. I was told I was harder to test because of the other diagnoses I have.
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    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    Why are so many people assuming you need to be different to like math? Is it not more the perception of society and the wrong wording of Aspie questions in addition to a very narrow minded view of Aspergers, that makes Math students…
    I'm not saying you need to be different to like maths. I'm saying it's extremely helpful to be different in a certain way if you want to be good at maths.

    (I really don't know, why Cambridge Math students should be different, there is no reason for that.)
    To be frank, in order to get in to maths at Cambridge, you need to be very good at maths. To get in to maths at (say) Southampton, you need to be good at maths. Cambridge maths students are *highly* atypical in their maths ability. I was under the impression that aspieness and mathematical ability correlated very highly - your survey link http://docs.autismresearchcentre.com...etal_maths.pdf is interesting and surprising. I think few mathmos I know of [memo: that's already selected for less-Aspie people] are heavily autistic, but about half strike me as being somewhere on the spectrum. That suggests that what I know as "autism spectrum" is not what you know as "autism spectrum". My opinion that "if you are very good at maths, then you are probably on the spectrum" is revised as a result of that link to "if you are very good at maths, then you are considerably more likely to be on the spectrum than if you were not good at maths".

    (Original post by OU Student)
    I know a neurotypical with a degree in maths and computer science from Oxford. The maths thing is a myth. Not all people on the spectrum are good at maths.
    OK, I accept that "you can be neurotypical and good at maths" and that "you can be aspie and bad at maths". (I understood that already).

    Anyway, that's not the point. Pretend my first paragraph didn't exist, and that I didn't think that "being a Cambridge mathmo is a good indicator that you are on the spectrum". Does being diagnosed as aspie tell you anything you didn't already know?
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    (Original post by Smaug123)
    I'm not saying you need to be different to like maths. I'm saying it's extremely helpful to be different in a certain way if you want to be good at maths.


    To be frank, in order to get in to maths at Cambridge, you need to be very good at maths. To get in to maths at (say) Southampton, you need to be good at maths. Cambridge maths students are *highly* atypical in their maths ability. I was under the impression that aspieness and mathematical ability correlated very highly - your survey link http://docs.autismresearchcentre.com...etal_maths.pdf is interesting and surprising. I think few mathmos I know of [memo: that's already selected for less-Aspie people] are heavily autistic, but about half strike me as being somewhere on the spectrum. That suggests that what I know as "autism spectrum" is not what you know as "autism spectrum". My opinion that "if you are very good at maths, then you are probably on the spectrum" is revised as a result of that link to "if you are very good at maths, then you are considerably more likely to be on the spectrum than if you were not good at maths".


    OK, I accept that "you can be neurotypical and good at maths" and that "you can be aspie and bad at maths". (I understood that already).

    Anyway, that's not the point. Pretend my first paragraph didn't exist, and that I didn't think that "being a Cambridge mathmo is a good indicator that you are on the spectrum". Does being diagnosed as aspie tell you anything you didn't already know?
    I'm really not sure what point you're trying to make here. Your idea of Autism is wrong if you strongly believe that in order to be diagnosed, you have to be good at maths. I have a friend who is Autistic who has a PGCE in English.

    As mentioned, it's a myth that you have to be on the spectrum to be good at maths.

    All people on the spectrum (like everyone else) have their own talents, etc.
 
 
 
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