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It's going to get very cold, quite soon - are you prepared? watch

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    Anybody who wants to see snow check out this website for snow in Scotland..

    http://www.trafficscotland.org/livetrafficcameras/

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    (Original post by mxcs)
    Living on the South Coast it doesn't seem nearly as bad as everywhere else. Seeing Northerners trapped in the snow for weeks, schools closed, avalanches, etc. and all we had was some chilly winds.

    Got my Sorel snow boots, cosy jumpers and Primark fleecy leggings, bring it!
    Could never live south of the M4 personally, in most winters its the line of death for snow (i.e. rain south of it).
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Could never live south of the M4 personally, in most winters its the line of death for snow (i.e. rain south of it).
    Is that so? I've noticed when visiting friends in the Cotswolds that it can be snowing there but not snowing further south. However, I assumed that might be because it's hilly.

    What is remarkable is that it can be a lovely warm day in, say, May and green as anything in England after weeks of fine weather - and you head to Scotland or Wales and there are miles of snowcapped peaks! It's as if they are in a different climate entirely. These are only little hills, below 4,000 feet in the main.
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    Ahhh I always hit the streets looking like an eskimo as soon as October begins. With enough hot chocolate, 4 of the huge nutella tubs and woolly socks I can safely say that I am prepared! But I love winter! (For reasons which does include the expectant wait to hear that college is closed!)

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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Is that so? I've noticed when visiting friends in the Cotswolds that it can be snowing there but not snowing further south. However, I assumed that might be because it's hilly.

    What is remarkable is that it can be a lovely warm day in, say, May and green as anything in England after weeks of fine weather - and you head to Scotland or Wales and there are miles of snowcapped peaks! It's as if they are in a different climate entirely. These are only little hills, below 4,000 feet in the main.
    The hills in Scotland are hardly ever still snow capped in May. Maybe a few patches in the shade corries, but rarely more than that.
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    (Original post by c_al)
    The hills in Scotland are hardly ever still snow capped in May. Maybe a few patches in the shade corries, but rarely more than that.
    Admittedly it was early May, but that's precisely what it was like a few years ago when I was in the north of Scotland and a couple of years ago in North Wales.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Is that so? I've noticed when visiting friends in the Cotswolds that it can be snowing there but not snowing further south. However, I assumed that might be because it's hilly.

    What is remarkable is that it can be a lovely warm day in, say, May and green as anything in England after weeks of fine weather - and you head to Scotland or Wales and there are miles of snowcapped peaks! It's as if they are in a different climate entirely. These are only little hills, below 4,000 feet in the main.
    It makes sense really when you consider that the south when you consider that the south can only really get snow from north westerlies, north easterlies (both useless on the south coast because the showers die inland) or frontal snowfall driven by either a cold front from the north (mostly move south before the cold air like today) or what is known as a battleground snowfall as an area of low pressure approaches from the south west with a SE undercut ahead of it (in which case the coastal counties get a feed from the warmer sea).

    If you want the best of all worlds then Norwich, Leeds, Manchester, Newcastle are your best bets in England although Birmingham can get creamed by fronts, it's just too far inland for showers.
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    Thought i'd post a few charts that delivered here to keep the cold spirits up (perhaps people can share their own stories too). FWI my location during these events was BD11 in West Yorkshire at 186m.

    The culmination of a week of snow at 23cm on my bin lid..



    A beasterly packing in organised showers.



    The greatest single event i recall. A low bringing a cold front south stalled over Yorkshire as a wave developed, dropped south and increased snow intensity (the area west of London got 40cm). For me i got 21cm and measured the deepest depth of 29cm. The snow lay for 30 days from the 18th Dec to 18th Jan, also a record. Winter 2010 was epic!



    This produced -26.1C in Newport and -27.2C in Scotland. Needless to say, had you been on the streets in those locations you may well have frozen to death.




    .
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    Living as I do near a tube line I know the world will not grind to a halt, unlike the national rail network. I have the winter coat and the 'Bees' hat.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Thought i'd post a few charts that delivered here to keep the cold spirits up (perhaps people can share their own stories too). FWI my location during these events was BD11 in West Yorkshire at 186m.
    Ahh, BD11.

    I used to be a regular visitor to BD10 and was there during the winter of 2010 and 2009, which I think was another cold one. I had to drive back down south on Christmas day 2009 - the car took ages to defrost.
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    (Original post by Wattsy)
    And I thought that Newcastle was cold, good luck! As long as its ****ed off by the time I need to get back to comparatively tropical Yorkshire I don't think I'll mind too much, I've ticked off the warm coat requirement in a big way, my overdraft is still crying a little.
    It's cool, I've got scarves :cool: I love snow, I just need it not to snow until after I've got the train home. Then it can snow as much as it wants until I need to get the train back to uni, then it needs to stop.
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    Living as I do near a tube line I know the world will not grind to a halt, unlike the national rail network. I have the winter coat and the 'Bees' hat.
    Do not speak of the national rail network, I depend on it far too much.
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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Ahh, BD11.

    I used to be a regular visitor to BD10 and was there during the winter of 2010 and 2009, which I think was another cold one. I had to drive back down south on Christmas day 2009 - the car took ages to defrost.
    Yeah, winter 2009 is when cold winters came back.

    Girlfriend i assume.

    BD11 was brilliant for snow as you start getting to fields and there's a hill between Bradford and Leeds if you take that route so it gets fairly high.
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    (Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
    Do not speak of the national rail network, I depend on it far too much.
    The problem nowadays is not snow on the trains, it seems to be that some engine part can freeze (in Dec 10 i saw a couple of trains stranded at Leeds station) or that the signals break (which is what causes huge delays).

    At any rate with pressure increasing late in the week i wonder how temperatures will start to go.
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    It's getting up to -12 Celsius in kiruna in Sweden. SHET
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Girlfriend i assume.

    BD11 was brilliant for snow as you start getting to fields and there's a hill between Bradford and Leeds if you take that route so it gets fairly high.
    Former.

    I remember checking the forecast and trying to set off for home before the snow hit. Often leaving just as it started, and hearing about disruption on the M62/M606/M621/A650 and surrounding routes just as I was passing Woolley Edge on the M1.

    The feeling of accomplishment - having stayed til the very last minute and escaping the disruption was quite nice.
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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Former.

    I remember checking the forecast and trying to set off for home before the snow hit. Often leaving just as it started, and hearing about disruption on the M62/M606/M621/A650 and surrounding routes just as I was passing Woolley Edge on the M1.

    The feeling of accomplishment - having stayed til the very last minute and escaping the disruption was quite nice.
    Aye, i basically live at the intersection of the A58 and A650 between J27 and J26 of the M62.

    What i find amazing is just how well West Yorkshire does in marginal events. There have been so many times when my step father has been driving up the M1 and it's rain but as soon as you get towards Wakefield it turns to snow. Possibly being east of the Pennines does it.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Aye, i basically live at the intersection of the A58 and A650 between J27 and J26 of the M62.

    What i find amazing is just how well West Yorkshire does in marginal events. There have been so many times when my step father has been driving up the M1 and it's rain but as soon as you get towards Wakefield it turns to snow. Possibly being east of the Pennines does it.
    Ah, you must know of the garden centre at Tong? I used to go there all the time - I remember that they had a full sized wooden model of a motorbike. I think it was for sale - carrying quite a heavy price tag!

    It is strange how areas which are fairly close can experience such different weather. Another peculiarity is the ability for some areas to escape almost all extreme weather. Where I live for instance hardly sees any extremes in weather - except warm weather, where we do quite well!

    Lucky really.
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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Former.

    I remember checking the forecast and trying to set off for home before the snow hit. Often leaving just as it started, and hearing about disruption on the M62/M606/M621/A650 and surrounding routes just as I was passing Woolley Edge on the M1.

    The feeling of accomplishment - having stayed til the very last minute and escaping the disruption was quite nice.
    I stopped with my Dad in December once to fill up at Wooley Edge - seriously, that is the coldest place on this planet. It is colder than the South Pole. :eek:
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    I stopped with my Dad in December once to fill up at Wooley Edge - seriously, that is the coldest place on this planet. It is colder than the South Pole. :eek:
    It's a strange, isolated kinda place - set quite far back from the motorway with a tree line which blocks out some of the traffic noise.

    I always found it eerie.
 
 
 
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