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    (Original post by CharlieGEM)
    If you like facts then according to some studies it is a fact computer science has one the worst employment rates of any degree. Why that is, universities or employers have little interest in finding out.
    I would say some interesting points have been made in this thread, is Computer Science a worthless degree? No, and anyone who thinks that it is I would say are quite ignorant.

    At the top universities, the average starting salary of a Computer Scientist is much higher than the rest (~38k at Imperial, ~35k Oxrbidge, ~36k UCL, ~30k KCL, Warwick)

    Compared to, say Maths? (~30k at Imperial, Oxbridge; ~27k Warwick UCL etc)

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    Though I must stress that I grabbed those avg starting salaries information from UNISTATS and it's not the most reliable thing as the amount of students that they collect this data from is usually between 20-30.


    Its is because at this level the graduates tend to have more experience and more things to show for during their degree (via Github etc) and are more employable by big companies

    Furthermore, there's no rule stating that CS grads need to go into a dev jobs, in fact ~45-50% of Imperial CS grads apparently go into finance, this may be why the average starting salary is quite high. CS degrees involve high level of problem solving and Mathematics, thus gaining transferable skills to be able to work in other sectors like Finance.

    On the flip side, Comp Sci teaching in the UK isn't as good as it should be, far better in America (apparently), and it is true that any highly quantitative degree like Maths, Physics, Eng etc. can get you a job such as Software Eng (obviously if you have the experience). But this doesn't mean that a CS degree is worthless lmao.

    As we all know the Tech industry is one of the biggest growing industries in the world, with new technologies being created/updated every day, a CS degree gives you the foundation to be able to adapt to these changes. The outdated in 20 years thing is veryvague and even though it's true, almost everything will be outdated by that time. But people will adapt, as they always do.

    In my honest opinion, and this may sound a bit harsh, but I wouldn't pay £27k to study CS and a lower half university. At the lower half universities it starts looking more and more like an IT degree. This is the problem we face in the UK. At a majority of our universities, the CS that is taught is not good enough. It's only good 'enough' as you go higher up to universities like Oxbridge, IC, UCL, Warwick, Edinburgh etc.
    And I agree that this isn't fair.

    Just having that piece of paper wont help. And in my opinion this is what a majority of the unemployed CS grads fail to understand. Go out and commit yourself to some projects, both group and personal. Get involved in events and network. Employers only want people who can prove that they're good.

    Very good points have been made though, and apart from some of the exaggeration when it comes to the worth of CS degrees, everyone has valid points
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I agree!!!! It annoys me how people make blanket statements about job prospects, even on a micro level between different degrees but fail to specify which job/industry. Or to even acknowledge that it comes down to much more than a degree in X from Y university.

    Yep, most graduates/students are clueless about how to actually tailor CVs to specific jobs. It's a failure on the inaccurate careers advice (both at secondary school and at uni) that they've been spoonfed.
    A recruiter actually gave me a tiny amount of CV feedback and I transformed it all and since then i've always gotten past the CV stage for any job I applied for.
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    I saw some catastrophically bad CV's while at uni. For one most people have no "&%%"# remote idea of how to professionally format them. I've gone through years of small iterations with mine. The level of indifference you get with the careers service at the various universities will likely also play a big part in this. I was told by the careers service to make a separate skills section in mine. When I a couple of weeks later got cv feedback from a woman from pwc, she told me to integrate it back with the main sections. Compressed the whole thing to one page last spring and see no point of making it two pages any time soon. Using half a page to state all your university marks is just a waste of space.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    I saw some catastrophically bad CV's while at uni. For one most people have no "&%%"# remote idea of how to professionally format them. I've gone through years of small iterations with mine. The level of indifference you get with the careers service at the various universities will likely also play a big part in this. I was told by the careers service to make a separate skills section in mine. When I a couple of weeks later got cv feedback from a woman from pwc, she told me to integrate it back with the main sections. Compressed the whole thing to one page last spring and see no point of making it two pages any time soon. Using half a page to state all your university marks is just a waste of space.
    Any cv advice then? Could you show us an example CV of what PwC would want to see?
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    I saw some catastrophically bad CV's while at uni. For one most people have no "&%%"# remote idea of how to professionally format them. I've gone through years of small iterations with mine. The level of indifference you get with the careers service at the various universities will likely also play a big part in this. I was told by the careers service to make a separate skills section in mine. When I a couple of weeks later got cv feedback from a woman from pwc, she told me to integrate it back with the main sections. Compressed the whole thing to one page last spring and see no point of making it two pages any time soon. Using half a page to state all your university marks is just a waste of space.
    You can use your second page of a CV for projects you have worked on, that's what I did.
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    (Original post by TrojanH)
    Any cv advice then? Could you show us an example CV of what PwC would want to see?
    There is honestly so much CV advice out there already. Most universities will have CV advice publicly available through their websites (like for example Oxford). Look through a range of them and combine all the tips your find from that. I mostly used my own intuition. The careers service really didn't have any major advice for me at all. It was mostly about fine tuning for me. The more opinions you get on your CV, the better.

    Like, there is nothing wrong with this one objectively speaking. To me it just has formatting which screams made-in-5-minutes.

    (Original post by jacktrex)
    You can use your second page of a CV for projects you have worked on, that's what I did.
    Projects that you have completed in your own time? Sure, but if it's related to what you've done at work previously or at university, I would highly recommend to include that into your respective work experience and education sections.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    There is honestly so much CV advice out there already. Most universities will have CV advice publicly available through their websites (like for example Oxford). Look through a range of them and combine all the tips your find from that. I mostly used my own intuition. The careers service really didn't have any major advice for me at all. It was mostly about fine tuning for me. The more opinions you get on your CV, the better.

    Like, there is nothing wrong with this one objectively speaking. To me it just has formatting which screams made-in-5-minutes.



    Projects that you have completed in your own time? Sure, but if it's related to what you've done at work previously or at university, I would highly recommend to include that into your respective work experience and education sections.
    CVs with fancier formatting tend to go in the drain, as after it is processed through most companies CV readers, it just looks like a fat concatenation of words.
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    (Original post by TrojanH)
    CVs with fancier formatting tend to go in the drain, as after it is processed through most companies CV readers, it just looks like a fat concatenation of words.
    Based upon the fact that according to your profile page you haven't even gone to university yet, let me first make the following clear; I have been making CVs for nearly 10 years and have completed a masters level undergraduate degree.

    When I refer to CV formatting I am talking about things like the following:

    Did you use a font that just happened to be the one selected when you first opened Word or did you think about which one to use? Is it easy to read?
    Are you concious of the font size you are using?
    What about line spacing?
    Are you balancing text/white space well?
    Are you consistent with for example how you right or centre align everything?

    etc...
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Based upon the fact that according to your profile page you haven't even gone to university yet, let me first make the following clear; I have been making CVs for nearly 10 years and have completed a masters level undergraduate degree.

    When I refer to CV formatting I am talking about things like the following:

    Did you use a font that just happened to be the one selected when you first opened Word or did you think about which one to use? Is it easy to read?
    Are you concious of the font size you are using?
    What about line spacing?
    Are you balancing text/white space well?
    Are you consistent with for example how you right or centre align everything?

    etc...
    That's exactly what I wanted to know about . What factors influence your choice of font? I'm a fan of Adobe Kaiti Std. Really clear and spaced out wording. I sometimes alter the size to fit the pages, usually between Size 10 and 11. I don't think I can balance white space very effectively on a one page CV.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Based upon the fact that according to your profile page you haven't even gone to university yet, let me first make the following clear; I have been making CVs for nearly 10 years and have completed a masters level undergraduate degree.

    When I refer to CV formatting I am talking about things like the following:

    Did you use a font that just happened to be the one selected when you first opened Word or did you think about which one to use? Is it easy to read?
    Are you concious of the font size you are using?
    What about line spacing?
    Are you balancing text/white space well?
    Are you consistent with for example how you right or centre align everything?

    etc...
    Who cares what font it is in. Emphasising the details relevant to a particular role is way more important.

    I don't think it has ever mattered much which font my CV has been written in.
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    (Original post by CharlieGEM)
    Who cares what font it is in. Emphasising the details relevant to a particular role is way more important.

    I don't think it has ever mattered much which font my CV has been written in.
    Different people, different opinions. If you want to use Times New Roman and carbon copy the example CV from your careers service, go ahead.
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    Computer scientist grads make way more money from freelancing or becoming an entrepreneur than being employed
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    (Original post by CharlieGEM)
    Who cares what font it is in. Emphasising the details relevant to a particular role is way more important.

    I don't think it has ever mattered much which font my CV has been written in.
    As long as it's not Comic Sans!
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    As long as it's not Comic Sans!
    Yeah as long as it's not chosen for comedy value 😉
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Projects that you have completed in your own time? Sure, but if it's related to what you've done at work previously or at university, I would highly recommend to include that into your respective work experience and education sections.
    My CV didn't even have a work experience section, I just replaced it entirely with a projects section and employers seemed happy.
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    I am looking at it from the other side and have found it extremely difficult to find IT graduates who are actually interested in IT and looking for jobs. We have graduate roles but can't find the right people to fill them.
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    (Original post by AlphaGroup)
    I am looking at it from the other side and have found it extremely difficult to find IT graduates who are actually interested in IT and looking for jobs. We have graduate roles but can't find the right people to fill them.
    How do you assess whether or not a graduate's a CV is interested in IT?
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    Hi!
    We phone And on an initial overview I would look at location and then see what they have been up to. As a graduate I expect no work experience, but maybe hobbies that point to their IT interests... but I would then give them a call and see, and meet up face to face. We're an agency that wants to meet people rather than just phone or email
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    Bit late to the party, but my opinion is that a Computer Science degree on its own doesn't really stand you in good stead unless accompanied by some sort of work experience or involved personal project. I am Computer science undergrad myself and having completed a placement year as part of my degree as a software developer I feel this has opened up a lot more opportunities for after uni, and allowed me to land my first Grad Job. Not sure how I would feel leaving uni with no real work experience in the field.
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    (Original post by jjharrison)
    Bit late to the party, but my opinion is that a Computer Science degree on its own doesn't really stand you in good stead unless accompanied by some sort of work experience or involved personal project. I am Computer science undergrad myself and having completed a placement year as part of my degree as a software developer I feel this has opened up a lot more opportunities for after uni, and allowed me to land my first Grad Job. Not sure how I would feel leaving uni with no real work experience in the field.
    Smart, realistic comp sci grads who understand what the employers want, easily have the highest chance of employment.
 
 
 
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