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Undergrad who wears the niqab. Ask me anything Watch

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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    But do you have any friends that are completely not religious (atheist)?

    I would personally find the niqab (showing only the eyes), slightly offputting: as generally we are used to reading peoples faces during social interactions... so I assume it would only be from tone of voice and eyes that you can express emotion (other than physically ofc).

    Though, I am completely for freedom of religious expression (even though admittedly I greatly dislike religion), and it is a part of that, so its fine.
    No I don't have any friends that are atheists, although I wouldn't mind befriending one. It is fine that you find it off putting a lot of people do but once people get to know me they don't mind as much especially when they understand why I wear and they accept that it is a part of me. It is good that you think people should be allowed to religiously express themselves, so do I
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    (Original post by Ben_Dover)
    Your last sentence is classic. It was in fact you who called me an idiot first. Clearly demonstrates your level of maturity
    that was simply stating a matter of fact. based entirely on the fact you didnt realise niqabs were not and never have been 'islamic' what you are doing on this thread trying to bluff knowledge is a mystery.
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    (Original post by Meenglishnogood)
    that was simply stating a matter of fact. based entirely on the fact you didnt realise niqabs were not and never have been 'islamic' what you are doing on this thread trying to bluff knowledge is a mystery.
    As I said before, I didn't say that and you failed to understand my post. Not my fault you have the intellectual capability of a child
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    cringing at the fact that you can't spell woman...
    Cringing at the fact you're probably such an insecure teenager who doesn't feel good about themselves and tries to pick out grammatical errors just to make themselves feel better. Oh and cringing at the fact you can't argue against me so though you'll pick something irrelevant out. That's quite sad... and much more embarrassing so yes you should be "cringing."
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    (Original post by IbroSaunks)
    Logically speaking she probably didn't always know her friends and therefore would require social interaction according to your definition of it to make friends.

    She said she would show her face if requested for security reasons, and if it's not requested in every shop I guess it's because they're not paranoid.

    Huge dogs and clowns also scare some kids, they're kids, things that aren't necessarily harmful scare them all the time. How is this an issue?
    I said it limits it, not makes it impossible. I don't see how you can possibly argue that covering 90% of your face doesn't make talking to people harder/more awkward/more uncomfortable (mostly from their point of view).

    Or maybe it's because they think they might get accused of Islamaphobia?

    It's not the biggest issue, but it's an added negative of the niqab.
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    (Original post by securetrust)
    No I don't have any friends that are atheists, although I wouldn't mind befriending one. It is fine that you find it off putting a lot of people do but once people get to know me they don't mind as much especially when they understand why I wear and they accept that it is a part of me. It is good that you think people should be allowed to religiously express themselves, so do I
    I find that interesting. Deeply religious people tend to stick to other religious people. For example, people who wear a head scarf at uni tend to befriend only other Arabic people.

    I wonder what causes it to be that way, if atheists (probably the UK majority) choose to not interact with those with religious identity or vice versa.

    Yeah, freedom involves wearing what you want... as long as it is no real offence to anyone else.
    As you say, it is something that you probably have to get used to. Half of my family is Arabic (Morocco), but don't wear the religious attire.
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    You took it that way, not my fault.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    I find that interesting. Deeply religious people tend to stick to other religious people. For example, people who wear a head scarf at uni tend to befriend only other Arabic people.

    I wonder what causes it to be that way, if atheists (probably the UK majority) choose to not interact with those with religious identity or vice versa.

    Yeah, freedom involves wearing what you want... as long as it is no real offence to anyone else.
    As you say, it is something that you probably have to get used to. Half of my family is Arabic (Morocco), but don't wear the religious attire.
    I will disagree with you there, at my university people tended to more likely to befriend people from their ethnic background rather than their religious background. Also I found it hard to interact with some of the white British student in my course, they always seemed so closed up and unapproachable I don't know why, there were some other foreigners I used to talk to that weren't Muslim but we would never discuss our beliefs.

    I know there a some Arab countries where people don't normally wear religious attire, my parents didn't either and funnily enough they became more religious when they came to Europe.
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    (Original post by securetrust)
    I will disagree with you there, at my university people tended to more likely to befriend people from their ethnic background rather than their religious background. Also I found it hard to interact with some of the white British student in my course, they always seemed so closed up and unapproachable I don't know why, there were some other foreigners I used to talk to that weren't Muslim but we would never discuss our beliefs.

    I know there a some Arab countries where people don't normally wear religious attire, my parents didn't either and funnily enough they became more religious when they came to Europe.
    That was sort of my point as you said, though I expressed it poorly. Ethnic and religious background are reasonably correlated. White British are often atheist or religious (Catholic/Christian?); whilst those from say, the middle east tend to be Muslim. I phrased it as religion as the thread is about religious attire.
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    How do your friends recognise you if you're walking down the street?

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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    That was sort of my point as you said, though I expressed it poorly. Ethnic and religious background are reasonably correlated. White British are often atheist or religious (Catholic/Christian?); whilst those from say, the middle east tend to be Muslim. I phrased it as religion as the thread is about religious attire.
    I know what you are trying to say and in some way you are right but I still think a lot of people from my uni were more close to people from their own ethnic background.
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    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    How do your friends recognise you if you're walking down the street?

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    By what I wear, shoes ( mainly converses), bags, colour of hijab/jilbab but also a lot of my friends say they recognise me by the way I walk lol I don't how though
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    (Original post by securetrust)
    By what I wear, shoes ( mainly converses), bags, colour of hijab/jilbab but also a lot of my friends say they recognise me by the way I walk lol I don't how though
    But anyone could wear converse, have any sort of bag or colour or hijab or niqab (which is usually plain black anyway) and the walking thing sounds ridiculous. How are they meant to accurately recognise you that isn't guesswork?

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    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    But anyone could wear converse, have any sort of bag or colour or hijab or niqab (which is usually plain black anyway) and the walking thing sounds ridiculous. How are they meant to accurately recognise you that isn't guesswork?

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    My family and friends have said to me that they recognise me by my overall style and the way I walk and I do wear different coloured hijabs/jilbabs. It really depends on the person tbh, some are really sharp and know its me straight away and others guess it is me.
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    Not a question but I commend you for not compromising to your beliefs, I imagine you probably get a lot of stick for it, good for you for doing it anyway. You must be a really brave person.
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    Sorry if its been asked before already

    Did wearing a niqaab affect how you interacted with people at uni. (i.e. was it harder to make friends?)

    Did you make any male friends?

    Whats the situation in the halls, do you wear it in the kitchen? (assuming you are self catered and there are males in your halls)
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    (Original post by ronmack)
    Op Saudi Arabia does not follow Sharia. I'm sorry. No country in this world does currently.
    Iran follows it

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    (Original post by securetrust)
    Ask away

    Are you allowed to wear it in exams? (Without showing your face to university's authorities so that they can verify it's really you)
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    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    But anyone could wear converse, have any sort of bag or colour or hijab or niqab (which is usually plain black anyway) and the walking thing sounds ridiculous. How are they meant to accurately recognise you that isn't guesswork?

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    When you know someone who wears niqab it becomes pretty easy to recognise them by their eyes alone, believe it or not. If you know them well that is. If not, then you can tell by their clothes, for example their bag or their shoes, or the way they dress. No two people dress exactly the same, even if they are both wearing niqab

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    [QUOTE=SinaPars;48551220]Iran follows it

    I'm not Shia
 
 
 
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