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Which graduates are most likely to make 50k+ in their careers? Watch

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    A mate of mine did PPE at Warwick, his starting salary with bonuses came to roughly 65K (this was with the Nomura Bank). So economics and PPE (PPE with a centre around economics, as you can choose to specialise more in the PP part, but my mate tells me they have significantly lower salaries). Unistats is a good website for starting salaries (sometimes) and salaries after 40 months (sometimes).
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    (Original post by Just_Need_To)
    Can I ask something?

    How much do forensic scientists earn a year? I ask this because I am thinking of becoming one if I can.
    £18-35k, dependent on experience.

    Have you watched CSI? Yeah, so did everyone else, so there are masses of people looking to get into it.

    Improve your chances of getting a job in it, do chemistry or biochem.
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    (Original post by Asfoi)
    Oh my days mate you really have NO idea, this is completely WRONG!!!
    Please elaborate.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    ex bonus, and I've a few months left to get across that line anyway.
    You what, this is pre tax? You're basically a poor man, I thought we were talking take home

    lol

    (Original post by Sigma44)
    I did engineering and after working for a year as a management consultant, now make 40k+
    Where do you work out of interest (if you don't mind saying!)?
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    (Original post by M1011)
    You what, this is pre tax? You're basically a poor man, I thought we were talking take home
    Take home pay is very easy to manipulate.
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    (Original post by MrSupernova)
    Thought community pharmacy paid better than hospital? Or is that just in the early years?


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    In the early years, yes, up until you're about Band 8a in hospital, which you can easily reach 7-8 years after graduating, so at the age of 30. At that point, you'd be earning more than most community pharmacists your age.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    You what, this is pre tax? You're basically a poor man, I thought we were talking take home

    lol



    Where do you work out of interest (if you don't mind saying!)?
    London, not going to say which company coz it'll be very easy to guess who I am with all the info on here.
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    (Original post by miser)
    Sure, no problem.


    I went to UWE in Bristol.


    The top 15 students in my department were invited to a presentation from a person who had worked at CERN inviting applications to do our industrial placement there. I decided to apply and was eventually accepted. A few months later I got on a plane.


    I mostly developed tools which would provide diagnostics information about the computers in the server farms which would be doing the analysis of particle data from the CMS experiment. The tools would show for example memory usage, applications, etc., to help identify when things weren't working correctly.


    I'm currently a software engineer in the oil & gas industry.


    My career aim is to move into a management role and lead teams of engineers within my present industry.


    I'd recommend to involve yourself in personal projects which captivate your interest. You learn far more from executing projects you are passionate about than you do from lectures and projects at university, and employers want to hire people who are readily able to demonstrate their passion with concrete examples of experience. In my case before I got to university I had run a number of software projects by myself and collaboratively - different languages, platforms, etc. When you have got legitimate experience before even starting your course it makes it a hell of a lot easier (I hardly had to work until my second year) - you're a million miles ahead of most other people who have little if any experience of coding at all.


    No problem. Hope it was helpful.
    Thanks a lot for your responses. They have been incredibly helpful.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    £18-35k, dependent on experience.

    Have you watched CSI? Yeah, so did everyone else, so there are masses of people looking to get into it.

    Improve your chances of getting a job in it, do chemistry or biochem.

    Yh I am doing Biology and Chemistry for my A-levels along with Maths.
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    Speaking to my cousin, he said out of all his uni mates the dentists are by far on the most ATM. He said they're earning twice as much as most of them lol. His medic friends have had heated arguments with their dentist friends because of it because they work way more hours and get paid **** all lol
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    (Original post by plusC)
    Yeah if they apply their maths wisely then they can go far beyond 50k depending on the career, hence why I said potential. If you want to go into academia/research, you won't earn that much
    £50k in academia is perfectly achieveable, particularly in applied mathematics. Lecturers start on around £37k outside London and £40-45k at good London places. By the time you are 5-10 years in, those salaries will increase to around £50k. Also, if you are in an applied mathematics field which is relevant to industry, and working at a respected university then there will often be opportunities to do consultancy work for private companies, which can be billed at around £500-1000/day, so you can top up your salary by an extra £10-30k a year (depending on field). At more senior levels salaries are good too; a typical professor gets around £70k salary and has much more lucrative consultancy opportunities, however getting a professorship before your late 40s/50s is rare, and most academics will never get one at all.

    The main problem with academia is how difficult it is to get a permanent position; postdocs earn a lot less, and its very hard to make the transition from postdoc to lecturer, particularly in pure mathematics - most people who do mathematics PhDs will not get a permanent job at a good university (and if you end up at a lower tier place, salaries will be lower and that consulting money will be quite a lot harder to get). The other problem is that while £50k/year sounds like a lot when you are a student, you will quickly learn that it is nowhere near enough to live comfortably in London (and most of the south east) once you think about buying a house and starting a family, and when you leave the south-east your earning potential drops substantially. £50k in London is less money than £30k in Manchester, once you adjust for cost of living.

    edit: you can see academic salary figures here: http://www.timeshighereducation.co.u...emic_staff.pdf . Those are averages across all disciplines; typically applied mathematics fields will tend to be a bit higher (but only by around 5-10k), particularly if you include statistics and computer science as applied mathematics.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    He's not, but he's not considering how many varieties of accountants there are. The numbers he has quoted are pretty much exactly accurate for a big firm in London (bear in mind the big 4 alone take 2,000 grads in London per year).
    If he was talking solely about London then I apologise, I just know those figures are overly generous for even the big four(outside of London).
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    (Original post by Last Day Lepers)
    I never said they couldn't represent their clients in court, I said they don't have the same jurisdiction to represent clients in certain courts. But I don't really know exactly tbh.
    Apologies, the way you said 'again I don't think the talk on behalf of the client in a court room' led me to believe that you were saying solicitor advocates (and by inference all solicitors) have no rights of audience. Glad to clear up any confusion, anyway.
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    (Original post by C-Rooney)
    Architects, lawyers, chemical engineers..
    Nah, not the architects. Unless you have good connections, you will end in some council office, signing building permits, and this doesn't pay much.
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    Degrees that can lead to jobs in oil and gas, mineral exploration etc are likely to pay beyond the 50k mark, engineering, chemistry and Geoscience graduates.
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    (Original post by Dr DaMan)
    If he was talking solely about London then I apologise, I just know those figures are overly generous for even the big four(outside of London).
    No he didn't specify so your comment was fair - just saying that's where he's got those from because that's the exact route of big 4 london lol.
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    (Original post by namename)
    Nah, not the architects. Unless you have good connections, you will end in some council office, signing building permits, and this doesn't pay much.
    Really? I thought architects would be rolling in it. Probably more of a misconception then, eh?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Live on your own/just with your partner?

    Edit
    And how far over £50k do you earn? The poster said £50k.
    I live in a two bedroom apartment, myself and a flatmate, double room each. One ensuite and another bathroom in the flat. Literally just over 50k.
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    (Original post by ETRC)
    ortho and brain surgeons will get closeish to the top finance/maths grads but won't beat them.
    A higher % of imp/ortho will earn high but maths/finance will earn higher.
    You will never beat an Investment Bankers pay
    I am sorry but its a myth that just because you are a Investment Banker it guarantees you the highest salary. It does not work that way. It depends on alot of factors such as your ability, economy and to a certain extent experience. I know of other job professionals who earn more than investment bankers.
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    (Original post by ETRC)
    ortho and brain surgeons will get closeish to the top finance/maths grads but won't beat them.
    A higher % of imp/ortho will earn high but maths/finance will earn higher.
    You will never beat an Investment Bankers pay
    I don't think you will find many investment bankers at the top of the rich lists, so quite clearly you can beat them.

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