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Tesco workers refuse to sell Ham & Wine during Ramadan Watch

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    You can't stop the sell of products to someone because you disagree with ham and wine because YOU'RE "fasting"
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    The outrage is clearly disproportionate. We're not talking about a pilot flying to New York instead of Los Angeles because he feels like it, nor are we talking about a doctor that can't be arsed to treat a patient because he wants a fag break five minutes early. We're talking an isolated incident of thirty seconds' worth of inconvenience in a supermarket.

    It might be not in the best interests of the business to assign someone a responsibility which they won't always be willing to take on. But Sainsbury's have a policy of allowing checkout workers to refuse individual sales at their absolute discretion. They don't have to give a reason. They have an 'items per minute' minimum standard to stop them refusing willy-nilly. I think that addresses any potential issues perfectly.

    People that go to customer service to complain about a minimum wage employee need to have a look at themselves.
    It's a supermarket. You're going to encounter ham in a supermarket. And their wage is hardly relevant. They're being paid to be a job. I don't care what the figure is.

    If Sainsbury's want to take a lenient stance with their own employees that's up to them, although I suspect the policy isn't aimed at enabling employees who take personal objection to a particular product to refuse to sell them, and that this would have played out in exactly the same way if it had happened in a Sainsbury's.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    It's a supermarket. You're going to encounter ham in a supermarket. And their wage is hardly relevant. They're being paid to be a job. I don't care what the figure is.

    If Sainsbury's want to take a lenient stance with their own employees that's up to them, although I suspect the policy isn't aimed at enabling employees who take personal objection to a particular product to refuse to sell them, and that this would have played out in exactly the same way if it had happened in a Sainsbury's.
    If you draw refusing to sell a packet of ham parallel to not flying a commercial airliner full distance on a whim, we'll have to agree to disagree.

    As for your second point, it remains to be seen whether the worker is has his employers' backing or not.
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    I don't see how people are defending this employee.

    He took a job and is now refusing to complete the duties which are required for him to do that job, of course he should be disciplined or fired. It may not have been overly difficult for that customer to go to the self-service, but its an inconvenience she shouldn't of had to of faced and i would have complained as well. I work a minimum wage job, that doesn't mean i can start pick and choosing what part of my job description i choose to do and that apparently be perfectly ok.

    Where does it end? Vegetarians refusing to sell meat? Vegans refusing to sell almost everything? Seems simple to me, if you can't do that job because of your beliefs, then don't take that job.
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    (Original post by JG1233)
    I don't see how people are defending this employee.

    He took a job and is now refusing to complete the duties which are required for him to do that job, of course he should be disciplined or fired. It may not have been overly difficult for that customer to go to the self-service, but its an inconvenience she shouldn't of had to of faced and i would have complained as well. I work a minimum wage job, that doesn't mean i can start pick and choosing what part of my job description i choose to do and that apparently be perfectly ok.

    Where does it end? Vegetarians refusing to sell meat? Vegans refusing to sell almost everything? Seems simple to me, if you can't do that job because of your beliefs, then don't take that job.
    This, he should be fired.
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    :lol: such bs.

    You work in a supermarket, do your job, it won't affect him in anyway. :rolleyes:
    he shouldn't be fired just less arrogant.
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    People that go to customer service to complain about a minimum wage employee need to have a look at themselves.
    Why is the wage relevant at all? If you don't like the service you're getting you have every right to complain, that's the point of customer services.
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    If you draw refusing to sell a packet of ham parallel to not flying a commercial airliner full distance on a whim, we'll have to agree to disagree.

    As for your second point, it remains to be seen whether the worker is has his employers' backing or not.
    No, there is clearly a difference in seriousness between your ridiculous example, which would never actually happen, and the example in issue, which might happen and actually has.

    That does not make wage relevant. That a pilot is paid more than a checkout worker isn't obviously relevant. It's the degree of seriousness of the failure to follow instructions that's relevant. On the other hand, both clearly are failures of service which you'd be justified in complaining about.
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    I work in a pub/restaurant and almost all the kitchen staff (chefs, porters, pot wash) are Muslim, and fasting for ramadan currently. They cook sausages and bacon almost all day long. I asked them about it - they said they just cannot eat it, so they have no problem preparing it for others as that is their job.

    Seriously, I don't see why just because you have a religion then everyone should have to tiptoe around for fear of offending you. By all means, avoid meat and wine if you wish, but if it's your job to sell it to people, then do your job. Or take your holiday days during ramadan, or get a non-ham and wine selling career. It's really not that difficult.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    No, there is clearly a difference in seriousness between your ridiculous example, which would never actually happen, and the example in issue, which might happen and actually has.

    That does not make wage relevant. That a pilot is paid more than a checkout worker isn't obviously relevant. It's the degree of seriousness of the failure to follow instructions that's relevant. On the other hand, both clearly are failures of service which you'd be justified in complaining about.
    Salary corresponds to responsibility though. And skills: sacking a pilot is less likely to send him/her under the poverty line than sacking a supermarket employee. I know that sounds patronising on my part towards the lesser skilled worker, but sometimes I think it is better to analyse a problem on practicality rather than principles.

    Just a question though, if not for accommodating the beliefs of the worker, why do you think companies such as Sainsbury's allow staff to refuse sales at their entire discretion? Because then surely they are not 'doing their job'?
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    That's completely upto the business whether they allow their staff to do that. You're going to piss off a lot of people though if you allow your staff to do that.
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    Salary corresponds to responsibility though. And skills: sacking a pilot is less likely to send him/her under the poverty line than sacking a supermarket employee. I know that sounds patronising on my part towards the lesser skilled worker, but sometimes I think it is better to analyse a problem on practicality rather than principles.

    Just a question though, if not for accommodating the beliefs of the worker, why do you think companies such as Sainsbury's allow staff to refuse sales at their entire discretion? Because then surely they are not 'doing their job'?
    I'm not sure that's a relevant consideration. Most employers don't employ people out of charity. If you're not doing your job, in this economy, there's a line of people around the corner waiting for it whatever it is.

    I'm not sure why they'd have that policy. I'd guess to deal with troublesome customers etc. But I don't think the policy at Sainsbury's is particularly relevant. As I said, I think this would have turned out in exactly the same way at Sainsbury's. That is, someone would have complained to Sainsbury's about the company's service, and it would have made the news in just the same way. Sainsbury's would probably have apologised too.

    Anyway, if Sainsbury's have an 'items per minute' requirement, as you say, I imagine that would be breached by someone who would never serve anyone ham or wine. I bet a pretty large proportion of shopping baskets contain at least one of those things.
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    This woman is a ****ing snake. You ain't gonna die without your wine and ham fool.
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    (Original post by Harvey Dent)
    She's not a "****" at all. If I go to the till with a basket full of shopping and the cashier refuses to serve me for reasons as ridiculous as his religion then of course I'm going to complain.
    If you knowingly have ANY reason why you cannot sell ham or wine to a customer then you shouldn't be in a job that requires you to sell ham or wine. End of.
    This.

    Why work in a shop if you know you will be dealing with ham/wine at some point?
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    Isn't the fact it's Ramadan pretty pointless....

    Muslim's cant drink alcohol or eat ham anyway.... why work in the shop where you can't sell the goods?
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    He should quit or be fired. Simple as that.
 
 
 
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