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Did you go to private school? watch

  • View Poll Results: Did you go to private school?
    Yes I went to private school
    118
    39.07%
    No I went to a state school
    184
    60.93%

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    Yes. Currently and have been at a private school for over 5 years. I like my school very much

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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    Hi just would like to ask whether the people on here went to private school
    Yeah, been in private education 1st year through 5th year (years 7-11) and in my school's sixth form now, which is also private
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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    Hi just would like to ask whether the people on here went to private school
    No, In my opinion Private schools are not fair, because not everyone can afford it, but this bloody system is responsible for that.:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by 3309will)
    As a person that went to a private school, it doesn't half irk me when people say 'normal school'. What do you think that does on in a school that is fee paying, as opposed to a state-funded one, that makes it any less 'normal'?

    The stigma that follows me wherever I go now, especially when people I know at university find out about my schooling if they went to a state school, is something that pisses me off to no end. And people wonder why us private school people think that everyone is bitter towards us -- one only has to look at the reaction our education receives.

    Reverse snobbery is the worst form of snobbery.
    Awww, let me get my tiny violin out
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    No I didn't, but I went to a grammar school.

    I don't want to sound snobby, but if I had gone to a comprehensive school there is no way I would have achieved the grades that I have. Maybe it's just the comprehensive schools in my area - there are lots of schools local to me, four of them grammar, and the comprehensives do not perform nearly as well as the grammar schools or the private schools.
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    Went to mixed state primary school, then all girls private senior school, and currently at mixed private sixth form. I really loved senior school
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    (Original post by Robertus)
    Which is why I would very strongly encourage the idea of having multiple entry points from secondary schools to grammar schools. Someone who fails to perform sufficiently well in an entrance exam at 11, for instance, may be able to take a similar - but higher level of course - exam at 13. Or you could simply allow the exam to be taken at any point, at a level equivalent to the year of school they are currently in. Then, of course, allow admission at 16 into the Sixth Form based off of GCSE results.

    Equally, I think those who fail to perform well enough at grammar schools should be threatened with losing their place and being forced to move to a regular secondary school, so room can be made for those late bloomers who didn't initially gain entry at 11.

    The major problem with the current system is that it assumes that every child needs to be educated in the same way. Bright children who can neither afford private school fees nor access any grammar schools have no choice but to attend mixed ability comprehensives. This puts them in oversized classes with a lot of kids who simply do not have the same drive or ability as they do. And no, having multiple "sets" for different abilities does not solve this problem in the long run.

    By having several different kinds of school, there is an admission that every child must have an education that pertains to their specific needs and abilities. A beneficial system may be to have grammar schools for the top achievers, academically-based secondary schools for middle achievers, and vocationally-based colleges and schools for those who benefit more from a non-academic structure. Alongside that I think the private/public schools should be allowed to exist, as an alternative option. Though I would expect less parents would be inclined to choose that option if we a had a more diverse state sector that accommodated for the varying needs of our youth.
    I live in Kent, and people do transfer between comprehensive to grammar schools, and to gain entry into any sixth form there are certain GCSE grade requirements, regardless of what type of school you come from! So yeah, just because you go to a comprehensive aged 11 does not mean you're stuck there (at least this is the situation in Kent!)
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    No; I went to one of the shabbiest school is shabbiest towns in UK (ethnic minority school in poorest area of deprivated suburbs of Manchester- it was so poor goverment had to renovate it); and still managed to get offers and private-school-standard grades. Even when no one in last three generations (or more) went to Uni (from my family tree), I will be the pioneer.
    Much like in Thomas Theorem- I am too driven to become at least "someone"- and loathe when I am "dumbed down" due to stereotype.
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    I went to a comprehensive state school and got all A*s in my GCSEs. Paying for your education doesn't automatically give you brains. And I feel much prouder of my accomplishments; if I had gone to a private school I would have just blended in & wouldn't have been regarded as anything special, whereas at my current school everyone finds my results amazing
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    i have been going to a private school since reception am now in year 13
    you pay for the individual support and attention from teachers, small classes extra curricular activities etc rather than necessarily just better grades but yes it can be difficult when a large proportion of the year is doing well but they are designed to maximise potential which of course you can have no matter what type of school you attend
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    I went go to a private secondary school. However, as it is completely non-selective - infact the nearby state schools impose higher academic requirements - this means it has rather low academic standards, which is very irritating as I think one of the main benefits of selective private schools is that they have a multitude of highly academic and ambitious students. It is also full of highly pretentious and superficial people who like to think that they are upper class, but they're actually not. I can't wait to leave this school and go to a university that I actually like.
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    Yes. Private primary and secondary.
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    Nope - i attended a grammar school (over 750 years old) .... Would give my left nut to attend a london private school like St Pauls or Haberdashers Askes tho
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    Not sure if it counts as a private school, but I went to Hogwarts from year 7 to 11.
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    I've been to many private schools.
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    I went to a private primary school but the best secondary school where I grew up was a state grammar school, so I went to that afterwards.
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    (Original post by Baby Milo)
    It's an expensive fashion label. What is your point exactly? Maybe if your parents invested their money with more thought as opposed to paying for you to be schooled you'd be able to afford such. Enjoy your gap year and Primark shopping trips.
    ...That made no sense... Most people in private schools can easily afford such fashion labels. Its usually the less affluent "chavs" that dream and save up for long periods of time for such items of "reputation" for them.
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    Yes, I have attended public school throughout the entirety of my life!
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    Currently in a private school. The school life is richer and the experience of studying here is great to compared to the state school i was in 2 years ago. I would say that some pupils here tend to look down on state school kids which always irritates me(as not all of them are as they think they are). The education is more of a close experience where the classes are small and pupils receive more attention and help but the level of students you get here makes the school even better. Its great to learn in a environment where everyone is thinking at a high level and it motivates you to improve yourself due to competition. I would say theres a reason for most private schools (i think, at least mine anyway) to do better than state schools in exams or Oxbridge success and i think that relies on the teaching as well as the candidates that the school has. So overall i think it is a pleasant experience. Saying that, i dont think state schools are by any means far off. Grammar schools are halfway between state and private schools in my opinion and if my parents were not affluent enough to send me here, then i wouldn't have any problem studying in a grammar school or even a state school if i wasn't smart enough. Whatever school you're in, its your hard work that results in grades but its easier to get them in private schools (imo due to the teachers) and have a better experience.
 
 
 
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