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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    People resent what they can't get.
    I think they are jealous of us. When I talk about my holidays my granny always says "enough about you" and when we came back from 5 weeks in America this summer my aunt said we spent too long there and she'd hate to go there "because America is a dump". She hasn't even visited!

    We aren't even rich! They don't like me talking about what I would like to achieve either. Apparently the likes of 6 long haul holidays is over ambitious.
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    (Original post by SiminaM)
    I am asking myself the same thing sometimes. Some very bright people simply don't know what to do.
    I find it is usually people born with not alot of money who are used to it.
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    So many people go for high paid careers that they are becoming very competitive, and somebody who has trained in law (for example) may never be able to practice as a lawyer, therefore totally wasting their time and money at uni.

    People that go for lower paid jobs may end up better off, in many circumstances. Take someone who wants to be teacher, they become one and then enjoy a career and see their salary steadily rising as they become head of department, or even head teacher. Plus, a teaching careers are easier to get as they are less competitive.

    It is commonly perceived that there are only few careers which pay well (e.g. law and investment banking) The truth is, good money can be made in just about any sector if one is committed enough. A chap I know makes a fortune by working for McDonalds for years as he was promoted continuously , rising from a cleaner to a regional manager.
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    (Original post by bertstare)
    Would never work for under £50k lol that's poverty time, but I would certainly much rather do something I genuinely enjoy and make £100k vs. say becoming an investment banker and making £300k but hating my job. Now adjust that £100k figure depending on how much each person feels they need to live a good life, and you have your answer I think
    How is £50,000 poverty?? My dad has a pension just above that and we can afford two long haul holidays a year and 3 houses.
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    (Original post by Frostyjoe)
    How is £50,000 poverty?? My dad has a pension just above that and we can afford two long haul holidays a year and 3 houses.
    Only 2? That's poverty.
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    (Original post by Frostyjoe)
    I think they are jealous of us. When I talk about my holidays my granny always says "enough about you" and when we came back from 5 weeks in America this summer my aunt said we spent too long there and she'd hate to go there "because America is a dump". She hasn't even visited!

    We aren't even rich! They don't like me talking about what I would like to achieve either. Apparently the likes of 6 long haul holidays is over ambitious.
    This attitude is ingrained at school, apparently if you have the confidence to succeed your arrogant and should be humble.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    This attitude is ingrained at school, apparently if you have the confidence to succeed your arrogant and should be humble.
    I agree, a lot of people seem to look down upon ambition and achievement.

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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    This attitude is ingrained at school, apparently if you have the confidence to succeed your arrogant and should be humble.
    I personally think its jealously or insecurity. Its not like i'd be bragging.
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    I'm just going to dump my response from a similar post here:

    Not everyone's idea of a dream job is a well paid one.
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    A number of my extended family members have very high paying jobs in finance and I've seen the enjoyment and high standard of living that can be achieved by working hard and climbing up the ladder. I've always known money to be the source of happiness.

    Money gives you the ability to sleep comfortably knowing you can pay all of your bills on time. It gives you the ability to buy your own home, car, food and clothing. It gives you the ability to send a great amount of money to those living in poverty in your parent's country and to provide for your parents and ensure they live very comfortably in old age. That is very, very important in my culture and I'm sure this is where the distinction lies between me and other British 18-24 year olds.

    It's incredibly easy for a middle class, white, under-18 year old child to comment on how happy a £20,000 job following the completion of a lacklustre degree would make them because have yet to enter the real world. It's all fun and games until you realise you have no higher position to climb to, no significant increase in wage or the inevitable problem of caring for your parents in old age.
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    (Original post by shaka33)
    A number of my extended family members have very high paying jobs in finance and I've seen the enjoyment and high standard of living that can be achieved by working hard and climbing up the ladder. I've always known money to be the source of happiness.

    Money gives you the ability to sleep comfortably knowing you can pay all of your bills on time. It gives you the ability to buy your own home, car, food and clothing. It gives you the ability to send a great amount of money to those living in poverty in your parent's country and to provide for your parents and ensure they live very comfortably in old age. That is very, very important in my culture and I'm sure this is where the distinction lies between me and other British 18-24 year olds.

    It's incredibly easy for a middle class, white, under-18 year old child to comment on how happy a £20,000 job following the completion of a lacklustre degree would make them because have yet to enter the real world. It's all fun and games until you realise you have no higher position to climb to, no significant increase in wage or the inevitable problem of caring for your parents in old age.
    Very well put lad.
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    My teacher left a city job of £98k, to being a teacher for £40k. He said if he had the chance, he wouldn't go back, because he prefers this job and environment so much. He also is one of the nicest teachers I have ever met, so for some/most people, it's because they want too.
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    I'm sure everyone would love to be on a £50k+ job but in reality, it takes a lot of time for most people to reach that salary and for some people, it's just not necessary to have more.

    The more you get paid, the more responsibility and pressures you have too.
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    As much as you need money, it is not my overall motivation in life. I'm currently training to be a paediatric nurse and wouldn't change it for anything. I love what I do and knowing that I'm helping people and making their life better is more important to me than money.
    Personally, I'd rather have a job that I enjoy and helps others like this than a job that I hate and dread going to which pays significantly more.


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    Because I have met a few investment bankers and they were all arrogant, annoying and if I had to spend my weeks around people like that, then I would go mad.

    As for other industries like law, I would rather have a bit less money and less stress than more money and spend my life sleep deprived, looking haggard and feeling like I'm drowning in work.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    I really find it hard to understand why people go for low paid jobs when they seem to have the intellectual capability to aim for industries which are relatively well-paid.

    I see students who have the credentials and the profile potential to enter industries such as law, investment banking being etc.. but instead choose to go into places such as teaching. Are they just lazy?

    So if you do intend to get out of bed for a job that pays less than £50k a year and you're smart (i.e flawless grades/credible uni/strong ECs), why? what's your motivation?

    inb4, "it's my passion".
    In answer to this thread i too don't really understand why people would be happy with a very low salary but i do understand why people don't go after a massive salary. For me I've thought about this before and assuming i had a wife then i'd only really need us to earn £4k per month collectively (i'd prefer to be the breadwinner) post tax, anything above that in my opinion will simply yield diminishing returns in terms of the effort expenditure needed working 90 hours a week versus having a nice life and doing a bit of gardening in my free time while making sure my children go to a grammar school and get private tuition putting them on the path to join the corporate or ruling class.

    So i guess i both agree and disagree with you. I agree that people should be aiming for a high wage (in my imagined household that's probably close to £60k pre-tax) to be very happy and comfortable but at the same time i don't see the point in slaving away when you've already reached the most efficient point of happiness utility in terms of income versus effort.

    Plus, unless your earning into six figures then it's not your wage which will make you wealthy but rather your investments. For me, my salary is simply a means to that investment end.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    SW & I could go back to where I interned this summer. Kept in contact with manager. Someone did exactly the same and is now on a full-time offer there and I'm like 90% sure I performed better than them the first time they interned.. but idk.. I'd rather get onto a 1st tier. This thread is just demotivating.. I hope I don't have 2nd thoughts on my career aspirations.

    Initially I wanted to go into journalism but looking at earning potentials took over.. and I haven't the first clue of how to make journalism lucrative and I don't do a relevant degree for that career.
    Do you watch financial outlets like Bloomberg? Financial journalism can be pretty lucrative if you have the ability to develop a network of contacts in the city or connected to the rich. Plus as an economist or some such your analytical abilities will do you well.
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    Why inb4 "it's my passion"

    I'm training to be a teacher because it's what I've always wanted to do and it makes me happy.

    I've been told I should have "aimed higher" and it's a possibility that I could have ended up in a job with better pay. But I didn't want to do anything else. For me, it's more important that I'm doing something I'm happy with than being in a job with a massive salary and it not being what I want to do
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    Depends how I am receiving the money. I rightly or wrongly associate being on 40k+ in the middle class rat race with working horrible long hours and lots of stress.
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    (Original post by bumblebee342)
    Why inb4 "it's my passion"

    I'm training to be a teacher because it's what I've always wanted to do and it makes me happy.

    I've been told I should have "aimed higher" and it's a possibility that I could have ended up in a job with better pay. But I didn't want to do anything else. For me, it's more important that I'm doing something I'm happy with than being in a job with a massive salary and it not being what I want to do
    Me too! It's not that I don't want to be well paid, that would be lovely, but it's not the most important thing. I'll still have plenty of money to live on, and ambitions of being a Head which would be more.

    And anyone who thinks teaching is a job for lazy people is pretty ignorant!
 
 
 
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