Plane crash: Germanwings A320 crashes in French Alps Watch

neal95
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#161
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#161
(Original post by x-pixie-x)
Only so many times the captain would've needed the toilet on a short flight so I reckon he would've still crashed it even if they were over a city.
yeah that's true he was probably just waiting for opportunity to arise now I think about it, and wouldn't have cared about the collateral, I mean in that state of mind that's probably the last thing you would think about
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Drewski
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#162
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Yes but being prone to depression doesn't sound a good trait for a pilot, does it?
No more or less than it would be for any other profession. We don't know the circumstances of the previous bout, would be wrong to assume anything.

There are many - independent - medical standards that pilots have to meet to be able to get a license. He clearly was healthy enough to meet those.
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786687
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what happened to FAA regulation about at least 2 pilots being in cockpit at any given time?!

first officer/pilot that left the cockpit is equally responsible for breaching regulation.
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davidguettafan
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#164
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(Original post by 786687)
what happened to FAA regulation about at least 2 pilots being in cockpit at any given time?!

first officer/pilot that left the cockpit is equally responsible for breaching regulation.
I thought that's just a US regulation?
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The Assassin
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#165
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Perhaps FAA policies should be introduced -- which would help but not 100% stop .


(Original post by 786687)
what happened to FAA regulation about at least 2 pilots being in cockpit at any given time?!

first officer/pilot that left the cockpit is equally responsible for breaching regulation.
Only for the US.
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Drewski
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#166
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(Original post by 786687)
what happened to FAA regulation about at least 2 pilots being in cockpit at any given time?!

first officer/pilot that left the cockpit is equally responsible for breaching regulation.
FAA is an American organisation with no jurisdiction anywhere else in the world.
There are no similar laws in Europe (yet).
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InnerTemple
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#167
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(Original post by 786687)
what happened to FAA regulation about at least 2 pilots being in cockpit at any given time?!

first officer/pilot that left the cockpit is equally responsible for breaching regulation.
It's an FAA rule. It applies to the US. Elsewhere there are no such rules.

Also, as far as I am aware, there are no requirements for two pilots to be in the cockpit. It's two people or the door left open (but the doorway blocked by a crew member).

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786687
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#168
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striking similarity to Silk Air flight 185
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the bear
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#169
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#169
Mr Lubitz was on facebook ( now deleted ) :

link is on this page:

http://www.libertynews.com/2015/03/g...urder-suicide/
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786687
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#170
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(Original post by MJK91)
It doesn't sound like terrorism. Sounds like one of four scenarios, probably in order of plausibility:

1) No 2-man cockpit rule, so one pilot has left and gone to the toilet. No flight attendant in with co-pilot, but door is locked anyway. Co-pilot falls unconscious (MI, stroke?). Let's assume this plane (as an older model) was refitted with a simple deadlock from the inside and no override. There's that.

2) I've heard that a door override code is common, especially on carriers where it isn't mandatory to have two people in the cockpit at all times. Pilot leaves, co-pilot again falls unconscious for an unknown reason. Door override is broken, can't unlock. There's that.

3) As above but unconsciousness caused by a blowout rather than a medical condition. Odd that no oxygen is released or warning sounded in this instance however.

4) Co-pilot suicide? Very rare but door overrides can be temporarily disabled for 5-20 minutes from the cabin, in case of terrorism for example. Could have locked out the pilot. I say suicide rather than a terror act because of the pilot being experienced, and also the slow decent. Perhaps so he could change his mind if he wanted to later on? Uncertainty? Sounds unlikely anyway.
1) plane was flying on autopilot set at 38,000ft, so unless he was somehow slumped over the control column which would have disengaged AP, this is pretty much impossible
2) possible
3) Since helios disaster, cockpit is fitted with warning that indicates decompression. Besides, the first officer would have regained consciousness as the plane descended (why would it descend in the first place, though). therefore, it's impossible.
4) most probable
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Josb
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#171
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(Original post by rockrunride)

How can they get around this one? Maybe introducing (for the pilots only) a second cockpit access code that guarantees entry without putting the entry request to anyone already occupying the cockpit? But guaranteeing entry would reduce security... so sad.
Never leave a pilot alone in the cockpit. :dontknow:
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cole-slaw
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Yes but being prone to depression doesn't sound a good trait for a pilot, does it?

Depression in extreme circumstances might make you suicidal. It doesn't make you a murdering psychopath. That's a different condition entirely.
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786687
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#173
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(Original post by Josb)
Never leave a pilot alone in the cockpit. :dontknow:
exactly, which is already FAA regulation, but apparently this only applies to the US for some absurd reason.
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Drewski
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(Original post by 786687)
exactly, which is already FAA regulation, but apparently this only applies to the US for some absurd reason.
Because the FAA is an American body.

That's like asking why does the NYPD not have jurisdiction in London.
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the bear
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#175
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Easyjet have announced they will not allow crew to be alone in the cockpit:

http://www.itv.com/news/update/2015-...alps-disaster/
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786687
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(Original post by Drewski)
Because the FAA is an American body.

That's like asking why does the NYPD not have jurisdiction in London.
why are the NTSB so insistent in helping out in every single plane crash then?
FAA rules should apply globally for all commercial flights.
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Drewski
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(Original post by 786687)
why are the NTSB so insistent in helping out in every single plane crash then?
FAA rules should apply globally for all commercial flights.
They offer their resources because they have lots of them, not because they have to. American law also gives them the right to be involved with American issues, so any Boeing crash - no matter where in the world or from which airline - will be investigated by NTSB.
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InnerTemple
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(Original post by 786687)
why are the NTSB so insistent in helping out in every single plane crash then?
FAA rules should apply globally for all commercial flights.
They only do this in certain situations. Maybe if the aircraft or airline involved is American.

They will also assist if requested by the authorities in other countries. Just like the Met police might offer to help another country in a police investigation.

This is different to laying down regulations, which us what bodies like the FAA and CAA do.

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786687
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#179
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(Original post by Drewski)
They offer their resources because they have lots of them, not because they have to. American law also gives them the right to be involved with American issues, so any Boeing crash - no matter where in the world or from which airline - will be investigated by NTSB.
so how come the French aren't allowed to get involved with any airbus incident?

lets face it, the US is the most powerful nation in the world.

Only they have the power to implement global commercial aviation regulation.
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Drewski
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#180
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(Original post by 786687)
so how come the French aren't allowed to get involved with any airbus incident?

lets face it, the US is the most powerful nation in the world.

Only they have the power to implement global commercial aviation regulation.
They are. If they want to. Though, remember, Airbus isn't solely French.

At that level all the international agencies work together, but too many cooks can spoil the broth, so they often decide to allow others to take the lead.

And no, they're not. European aviation is a much bigger deal. More companies, more operators, more clout.
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