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NHS Scientist Training Programme 2016 applicants! watch

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    (Original post by librarygirl)
    Hi, are any parts of the numerical test no calculators allowed?
    No, it's all calculator as you just do it yourself at home in all one sitting.



    Also, does anyone know if it hinders your chances to apply for two specialisms? I'm desperate for Rep Med and I thought I may as well apply for Genomic Counselling too as I'm interested in that also, but I don't want to if it'll make me less likely to get into Rep Med?
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    (Original post by a6georgia1)
    No, it's all calculator as you just do it yourself at home in all one sitting.



    Also, does anyone know if it hinders your chances to apply for two specialisms? I'm desperate for Rep Med and I thought I may as well apply for Genomic Counselling too as I'm interested in that also, but I don't want to if it'll make me less likely to get into Rep Med?
    Don't you have to choose two specialisms anyway, or can you just choose one? I don't think it makes a difference, seeing as they say they all use same selection criteria. Also, your chances are not more or less likely by choosing hospitals with less or more positions.
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    (Original post by librarygirl)
    Don't you have to choose two specialisms anyway, or can you just choose one? I don't think it makes a difference, seeing as they say they all use same selection criteria. Also, your chances are not more or less likely by choosing hospitals with less or more positions.
    No you can just choose one if you want! I was just thinking like if they see you've applied to two they may think you're not as passionate for one specific field.
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    (Original post by a6georgia1)
    No you can just choose one if you want! I was just thinking like if they see you've applied to two they may think you're not as passionate for one specific field.
    Hmm yeah I thought about that when drafting answers to the questions. It's just one application form isn't it? They sure like to make it difficult! I wonder what previous applicants have done...
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    I think practically everyone will put down a second specialism. There's nothing to lose.
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    I wondering what are my chances of been accepted. I'm interested on Bioinformatics.
    My ultimate goal is to become a Clinical Trial Project Manager. I have 8 years of experience as a Project Manager on the IT (Information technology) industry but I don't have a degree or working experience on the Medical/Life Science fields.
    I have a degree in Business and a MBA (master in business science).
    "Staff working in cliincal bioinformatics use areas of computer science including software tools that generate useful biological knowledge by manipulating ‘big data’."

    Have you know of people with non clinical or medical backgrounds to be accepted to the programme?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by apantoja)
    I wondering what are my chances of been accepted. I'm interested on Bioinformatics.
    My ultimate goal is to become a Clinical Trial Project Manager. I have 8 years of experience as a Project Manager on the IT (Information technology) industry but I don't have a degree or working experience on the Medical/Life Science fields.
    I have a degree in Business and a MBA (master in business science).
    "Staff working in cliincal bioinformatics use areas of computer science including software tools that generate useful biological knowledge by manipulating ‘big data’."

    Have you know of people with non clinical or medical backgrounds to be accepted to the programme?

    Thanks
    You sound more suited to applying to the NHS Management Scheme to be honest. I don't think the scientific training program takes people without a scientific or relevant degree.
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    Hi guys, How strict are they about the word limit?
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    (Original post by sharpsri)
    Hi guys, How strict are they about the word limit?
    Very. It counts your words on the form, so I don't think it'll actually let you save it if you go over.

    (Original post by apantoja)
    I wondering what are my chances of been accepted. I'm interested on Bioinformatics.
    My ultimate goal is to become a Clinical Trial Project Manager. I have 8 years of experience as a Project Manager on the IT (Information technology) industry but I don't have a degree or working experience on the Medical/Life Science fields.
    I have a degree in Business and a MBA (master in business science).
    "Staff working in cliincal bioinformatics use areas of computer science including software tools that generate useful biological knowledge by manipulating ‘big data’."

    Have you know of people with non clinical or medical backgrounds to be accepted to the programme?

    Thanks
    Without a degree you have no chance I'm afraid. They won't even read your application.

    Without a scientific background though I'm not sure how you could answer some of the questions on the form.

    In less than 250 words, please state why you have applied for the Healthcare Scientist Training Programme. Give details of your motivation, suitability and future career development or aspirations. Describe what actions you have undertaken to increase your knowledge, experience and understanding of healthcare science and the training programme for your chosen specialism(s)

    In less than 250 words, please describe your commitment, interest and enjoyment of scientific practice and technology. Please provide examples of how you seek to develop, improve and adopt innovative processes in your work or studies.
    How can you demonstrate your commitment and enjoyment to science if you've had no experience of it?
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    Cheers Alex
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    Thank you! What do you email? Do you just say that you are interested in blah blah and ask if they have any work experience or shadowing opportunities available?


    (Original post by a6georgia1)
    Hi hgo!I messaged someone at the Uni of Kent who I knew did research in IVF in pigs/cattle (pretty much identical techniques to humans) and after a meeting he offered me a voluntary summer placement 😊. All my experience has just been from emailing random relevant people and hoping that something comes from it!
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    (Original post by hgo)
    Thank you! What do you email? Do you just say that you are interested in blah blah and ask if they have any work experience or shadowing opportunities available?
    Yeah pretty much! Just said I was interested in his work and would love to do a placement in his lab, and he said yes luckily
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    I was successful for Clinical Biochemistry last year, and I've just had a look through this thread out of curiosity, so thought I'd add a couple of pieces of advice:

    - Practice the online tests as much as possible - the time limit for each question was ridiculous, but if you can get a bit quicker at working out what you think is a ballpark figure for the answer it will help. There were about 30 options for each answer last year & I didn't work out any of the questions properly so I reckon it marks you based on how close to the actual answer you were.
    - Not having loads of NHS experience doesn't matter, but bear in mind that they want to see that you've done your research and you know what you'd be getting into, not just for the STP, but in terms of career progression too, as they want people who are committed. At the end of the day a lot of money is invested in one trainee so it pays to show you understand where it leads to.
    - If you're applying straight from undergrad, where questions want you to give examples, try to use examples from outside of your degree if you can. My supervisor has been involved in shortlisting & interviewing before and she said she likes to see that someone does things outside of their studies.
    - You've got nothing to lose by putting down a second specialism as neither specialism will be aware that you did. But with only 250 words per question it is difficult to demonstrate your passion for two different specialisms, so if there is one in particular you want to do, it's better to focus on that one. I put down Immunology as my second specialism and got 45/69 at shortlisting because I'd focussed so much on Biochemistry in my answers, but because I'd done that so well I got 66/69 for Biochemistry shortlisting. So it can pay off to focus on just one specialism...if you are going to put a second specialism down and you have equal preference for both, choose two that are closely linked as it will make writing the form a lot easier.

    I'm happy to answer any questions, this thread was really useful when I was applying last year
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    (Original post by BlueSheep32)
    I was successful for Clinical Biochemistry last year, and I've just had a look through this thread out of curiosity, so thought I'd add a couple of pieces of advice:

    - Practice the online tests as much as possible - the time limit for each question was ridiculous, but if you can get a bit quicker at working out what you think is a ballpark figure for the answer it will help. There were about 30 options for each answer last year & I didn't work out any of the questions properly so I reckon it marks you based on how close to the actual answer you were.
    - Not having loads of NHS experience doesn't matter, but bear in mind that they want to see that you've done your research and you know what you'd be getting into, not just for the STP, but in terms of career progression too, as they want people who are committed. At the end of the day a lot of money is invested in one trainee so it pays to show you understand where it leads to.
    - If you're applying straight from undergrad, where questions want you to give examples, try to use examples from outside of your degree if you can. My supervisor has been involved in shortlisting & interviewing before and she said she likes to see that someone does things outside of their studies.
    - You've got nothing to lose by putting down a second specialism as neither specialism will be aware that you did. But with only 250 words per question it is difficult to demonstrate your passion for two different specialisms, so if there is one in particular you want to do, it's better to focus on that one. I put down Immunology as my second specialism and got 45/69 at shortlisting because I'd focussed so much on Biochemistry in my answers, but because I'd done that so well I got 66/69 for Biochemistry shortlisting. So it can pay off to focus on just one specialism...if you are going to put a second specialism down and you have equal preference for both, choose two that are closely linked as it will make writing the form a lot easier.

    I'm happy to answer any questions, this thread was really useful when I was applying last year
    Hi. I'm actually very interested in Biochemistry after visiting an NHS lab but my background is more microbiology and immunology, so thought applying for those would give me more of a chance. Would you say that is realistic?
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    (Original post by BlueSheep32)
    I was successful for Clinical Biochemistry last year, and I've just had a look through this thread out of curiosity, so thought I'd add a couple of pieces of advice:

    - Practice the online tests as much as possible - the time limit for each question was ridiculous, but if you can get a bit quicker at working out what you think is a ballpark figure for the answer it will help. There were about 30 options for each answer last year & I didn't work out any of the questions properly so I reckon it marks you based on how close to the actual answer you were.
    - Not having loads of NHS experience doesn't matter, but bear in mind that they want to see that you've done your research and you know what you'd be getting into, not just for the STP, but in terms of career progression too, as they want people who are committed. At the end of the day a lot of money is invested in one trainee so it pays to show you understand where it leads to.
    - If you're applying straight from undergrad, where questions want you to give examples, try to use examples from outside of your degree if you can. My supervisor has been involved in shortlisting & interviewing before and she said she likes to see that someone does things outside of their studies.
    - You've got nothing to lose by putting down a second specialism as neither specialism will be aware that you did. But with only 250 words per question it is difficult to demonstrate your passion for two different specialisms, so if there is one in particular you want to do, it's better to focus on that one. I put down Immunology as my second specialism and got 45/69 at shortlisting because I'd focussed so much on Biochemistry in my answers, but because I'd done that so well I got 66/69 for Biochemistry shortlisting. So it can pay off to focus on just one specialism...if you are going to put a second specialism down and you have equal preference for both, choose two that are closely linked as it will make writing the form a lot easier.

    I'm happy to answer any questions, this thread was really useful when I was applying last year
    Hey, thanks so much for the info, very useful! And congrats for securing a place last year! I'm applying for Genomics and Genomic Counselling, my degree is in Genetics, and I've got a decent amount of experience in research, and in an international genetic diagnostic lab...what scares me are the tests. Been practicing for quite some time, but as you said, the time limit for the numeracy test is ridiculous. Do you have any idea what the average test score was last year? Is it more in the range of 60-70% or 20-30%?
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    I'd be interested to see which other discipline genetics applicants are going for. I imagine most people applying for genetics put down bioinformatics as their second choice in the past, but now I wonder how many people are putting genetic counselling instead.
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    Alex - I'm sticking with Genetics/Bioinformatics, what about you? And which is your 1st/2nd choice? I get the feeling most go for Genetics 1st choice with Bioinformatics as their "I may as well put a 2nd" option. I'd imagine those who want a more patient facing role will go for Genetic Counselling... will be interesting to know for the Genetic Counselling/Genetics applicants which it is they are preferring too!

    BlueSheep - Nice to see you pop in the thread again, remember you posting a lot last year. I hope you are enjoying your job and congratulations on getting a place
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    I'm doing genetics/bioinformatics - don't think it makes any different which you order first and second because the applications are assessed separately. Bioinformatics is my preference, but I'd have to relocate for that, whereas genetics has places in my city. I'm only going to worry about it if I get offers for both though, it'll be likely that the decision will be out of my hands anyway.
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    Genomic Counselling is my preferred choice as I'd like a more patient-facing role, but Genomics is a close second. Wouldn't mind either, if I get a place
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    Well just done the online assessments...

    Kind of forgot how painful I found them last year!
 
 
 
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