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Who likes eating eggs here? watch

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    Nothing worse than a militant vegan, what I choose to eat is not subject to anybody's moral jurisdiction.
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    (Original post by Bupdeeboowah)
    Oh apologies for my mistake which caused your hysterical reaction. I meant 46 grams of protein for the average sedentary woman and 56 grams for the average sedentary man. Arguing with ideologues is tiring, you know?
    Okay so lets say 56.


    Now, given the fact that you have a wide variety of amino acids in separate vegetables (which I'm advocating a wide mix of cheap veg) we'll not bother calculating all of that, we'll just look at say, these two ingredients in a pasta dish:

    1 tin of beans (I had kidney to hand) and 1 serving of pasta.
    1 tin of beans contains 20grams of protein.
    However that's likely to be spread over two portions, so we'll call that 10 grams.
    1 severing of whole meal pasta contains 7 grams. Why not white? because white is nutritionally void in general and isn't worth spending money on (even if you're poor).

    So in that one meal you'll have at least 17 grams.

    Of course you might well also have some seeds in there, some peas (I mention peas because they are particularly proteinatious).
    For breakfast I would of course advice having porridge (5 grams for a serving made with water). And during the day could be seen to have bread with peanut butter (which yes, is affordable).
    The bread again, we'll say isn't white (because it's void of nutrients). 4 g of protein per slice. But then there's peanut butter (5g per table spoon). That's 9 grams per slice, so in two slices that's 18 grams.

    so 17+5+18 (we're only at lunch so far remember) =41 grams.

    Now lets say your last meal contains soya mince (which by the way, is cheaper per kg than normal mince that I've seen on supermarket sites):
    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ...s-1_soya+mince

    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ.../?id=260261027 (12 grams in one serving)

    41+12=53 grams.

    Given that that's without counting any vegetables, I think it's safe to say you'll get 3 grams (when counting the amino acids, which I'm not going to do because that'd take ages, you will get more than that) from the veg you eat. But in case you're still worried, just throw in a bit more soya mince to make it slightly more soya heavy. Or alternatively add in some lentils (for 3 grams you'll only need less than a handful).
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    And I totally respect that. My OP was just to enlighten people as to what happens in the egg industry. You guys kinda went off on a tangent about nutrition, and hopefully i've made the point that you can get everything you need from a plant based diet, minus the cholesterol and guilt trip that comes with eating eggs
    You are not enlightening anyone please. You are forcing opinions on others
    Eggs are very nutritious.
    Not really tbh.
    I eat eggs everyday and I still have low cholesterol, I am active and eat mainly healthy foods
    I'm not guilty and I'm sure many others aren't.
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    (Original post by aamirac)
    I wonder where the egg came from...
    I wonder what came first the chicken or the egg?
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Okay so lets say 56.


    Now, given the fact that you have a wide variety of amino acids in separate vegetables (which I'm advocating a wide mix of cheap veg) we'll not bother calculating all of that, we'll just look at say, these two ingredients in a pasta dish:

    1 tin of beans (I had kidney to hand) and 1 serving of pasta.
    1 tin of beans contains 20grams of protein.
    However that's likely to be spread over two portions, so we'll call that 10 grams.
    1 severing of whole meal pasta contains 7 grams. Why not white? because white is nutritionally void in general and isn't worth spending money on (even if you're poor).

    So in that one meal you'll have at least 17 grams.

    Of course you might well also have some seeds in there, some peas (I mention peas because they are particularly proteinatious).
    For breakfast I would of course advice having porridge (5 grams for a serving made with water). And during the day could be seen to have bread with peanut butter (which yes, is affordable).
    The bread again, we'll say isn't white (because it's void of nutrients). 4 g of protein per slice. But then there's peanut butter (5g per table spoon). That's 9 grams per slice, so in two slices that's 18 grams.

    so 17+5+18 (we're only at lunch so far remember) =41 grams.

    Now lets say your last meal contains soya mince (which by the way, is cheaper per kg than normal mince that I've seen on supermarket sites):
    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ...s-1_soya+mince

    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ.../?id=260261027 (12 grams in one serving)

    41+12=53 grams.

    Given that that's without counting any vegetables, I think it's safe to say you'll get 3 grams (when counting the amino acids, which I'm not going to do because that'd take ages, you will get more than that) from the veg you eat. But in case you're still worried, just throw in a bit more soya mince to make it slightly more soya heavy. Or alternatively add in some lentils (for 3 grams you'll only need less than a handful).
    Okay I've crunched the numbers of your diet plan and here are the results:

    Can of kidney beans:
    Weight: 240g
    Cost: £0.60
    Protein/100g: 8.1g
    Cost/100g: £0.25
    Size of 1 serving: 120g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £3.086
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 126 kcal

    Pasta (not the wholemeal kind, since we're talking about poorer people here):
    Weight: 500g
    Cost: £0.35
    Protein/100g: 5g
    Cost/100g: £0.07
    Size of 1 serving: 100g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £1.40
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 346 kcal

    Frozen peas:
    Weight: 1200g
    Cost: £1.40
    Protein/100g: 5.9g
    Cost/100g: £0.117
    Size of 1 serving: 80g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £1.977
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 63 kcal

    Porridge oats (how does one eat it with only water, I wonder; it tastes like sawdust):
    Weight: 500g
    Cost: £0.70
    Protein/100g: 10.3g
    Cost/100g: £0.14
    Size of 1 serving: 50g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £1.359
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 182 kcal

    Bread (not the wholemeal kind, since we're talking about poorer people here):
    Weight: 800g
    Cost: £0.55
    Protein/100g: 7.4g
    Cost/100g: £0.069
    Size of 1 serving: 36.36g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £0.929
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 87 kcal

    Peanut butter:
    Weight: 340g
    Cost: £0.65
    Protein/100g: 26.4g
    Cost/100g: £0.191
    Size of 1 serving: 20g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £0.724
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 134 kcal

    Soya mince:
    Weight: 375g
    Cost: 1.25
    Protein/100g: 14.1g
    Cost/100g: £0.507
    Size of 1 serving: 80g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £4.258
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 78 kcal

    Eggs:
    Weight: 805g
    Cost: £1.25
    Protein/100g:14.1
    Cost/100g: £0.155
    Size of 1 serving: 50g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £1.101
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 71.5 kcal

    Note: all of these foodstuff are the cheapest available ones found at Sainsbury (with the exception to the soya mince which was found at Tesco, because all of Sainsbury's soya mince had eggs in them).

    According to my calculations, your diet plan (excluding the amino acids which you mention, but including a serving of peas) will consist of 50.05g of protein with 1237 calories consumed, at the cost of £1.009 per individual using your diet.

    Some stray observations:

    1. Of all the food, only peanut butter and bread (yes, even the low-quality ones) were more protein and cost-efficient than eggs, being 52% and 18% respectively more efficient than eggs in terms of cost and protein.
    2. It would be far cheaper and protein-efficient to substitute foods like kidney beans, peas, and soya mince with eggs. Eggs were more efficient by those foods by 180%, 80%, and 287% respectively.
    3. Eggs contain all nine essential amino acids: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lycine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine, and three out of four of the nonessential amino (alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid) so they could very well also be as efficient as the vegetable's amino acids which you mentioned.
    4. In terms of caloric content, your diet falls short of the daily recommended intake of 2500 calories for men (since you used the figure of 56g of protein, which is the recommended daily intake for males), even if we did assume that a dinner (which already includes your soya mince) had 1000 kcal of sides. Your diet is unsustainable and could cause harm to health in the long run, and thus cannot be a good diet to be used to measure the benefits of going full vegan avoiding eggs.

    So no, I'm not remotely convinced by the numbers and diet plan you have presented me.
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    (Original post by Bupdeeboowah)
    Okay I've crunched the numbers of your diet plan and here are the results:

    Can of kidney beans:
    Weight: 240g
    Cost: £0.60
    Protein/100g: 8.1g
    Cost/100g: £0.25
    Size of 1 serving: 120g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £3.086
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 126 kcal

    Pasta (not the wholemeal kind, since we're talking about poorer people here):
    Weight: 500g
    Cost: £0.35
    Protein/100g: 5g
    Cost/100g: £0.07
    Size of 1 serving: 100g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £1.40
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 346 kcal

    Frozen peas:
    Weight: 1200g
    Cost: £1.40
    Protein/100g: 5.9g
    Cost/100g: £0.117
    Size of 1 serving: 80g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £1.977
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 63 kcal

    Porridge oats (how does one eat it with only water, I wonder; it tastes like sawdust):
    Weight: 500g
    Cost: £0.70
    Protein/100g: 10.3g
    Cost/100g: £0.14
    Size of 1 serving: 50g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £1.359
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 182 kcal

    Bread (not the wholemeal kind, since we're talking about poorer people here):
    Weight: 800g
    Cost: £0.55
    Protein/100g: 7.4g
    Cost/100g: £0.069
    Size of 1 serving: 36.36g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £0.929
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 87 kcal

    Peanut butter:
    Weight: 340g
    Cost: £0.65
    Protein/100g: 26.4g
    Cost/100g: £0.191
    Size of 1 serving: 20g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £0.724
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 134 kcal

    Soya mince:
    Weight: 375g
    Cost: 1.25
    Protein/100g: 14.1g
    Cost/100g: £0.507
    Size of 1 serving: 80g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £4.258
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 78 kcal

    Eggs:
    Weight: 805g
    Cost: £1.25
    Protein/100g:14.1
    Cost/100g: £0.155
    Size of 1 serving: 50g
    Cost per 100g of pure protein: £1.101
    Caloric content of 1 serving: 71.5 kcal

    Note: all of these foodstuff are the cheapest available ones found at Sainsbury (with the exception to the soya mince which was found at Tesco, because all of Sainsbury's soya mince had eggs in them).

    According to my calculations, your diet plan (excluding the amino acids which you mention, but including a serving of peas) will consist of 50.05g of protein with 1237 calories consumed, at the cost of £1.009 per individual using your diet.

    Some stray observations:

    1. Of all the food, only peanut butter and bread (yes, even the low-quality ones) were more protein and cost-efficient than eggs, being 52% and 18% respectively more efficient than eggs in terms of cost and protein.
    2. It would be far cheaper and protein-efficient to substitute foods like kidney beans, peas, and soya mince with eggs. Eggs were more efficient by those foods by 180%, 80%, and 287% respectively.
    3. Eggs contain all nine essential amino acids: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lycine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine, and three out of four of the nonessential amino (alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid) so they could very well also be as efficient as the vegetable's amino acids which you mentioned.
    4. In terms of caloric content, your diet falls short of the daily recommended intake of 2500 calories for men (since you used the figure of 56g of protein, which is the recommended daily intake for males), even if we did assume that a dinner (which already includes your soya mince) had 1000 kcal of sides. Your diet is unsustainable and could cause harm to health in the long run, and thus cannot be a good diet to be used to measure the benefits of going full vegan avoiding eggs.

    So no, I'm not remotely convinced by the numbers and diet plan you have presented me.
    Kidney beans at 60p?
    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ.../?id=259270789
    http://www.sainsburys.co.uk/shop/gb/...r--basics-400g


    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ.../?id=257974340
    That is cheaper mince


    And the reason my 'diet' here falls shorter for the kcals is because you asked about protein, just because you meet 56 grams doesn't mean you stop eating, I'm saying within the 2,500 mark you can easily meet your protein needs. So you've drawn a false dichotomy.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Kidney beans at 60p?
    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ.../?id=259270789
    http://www.sainsburys.co.uk/shop/gb/...r--basics-400g


    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/produ.../?id=257974340
    That is cheaper mince


    And the reason my 'diet' here falls shorter for the kcals is because you asked about protein, just because you meet 56 grams doesn't mean you stop eating, I'm saying within the 2,500 mark you can easily meet your protein needs. So you've drawn a false dichotomy.
    Apologies for the pricing of kidney beans. Still, if we were to revise the price of the kidney beans and soya mince, they would still be highly inefficient - eggs are still 40% and 152% more efficient.

    There is no false dichotomy, considering also that we were also talking about the price of the food given that the consumer is not well off. Doubling the amount of food to reach the 2500 calorie mark would result in doubling the cost, not to mention lacking in a lot of essential vitamins and nutrients, and at more than £2 per person, the cost price is actually extremely high for someone who cooks at home.

    So I'm still not convinced.
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    (Original post by Bupdeeboowah)
    Apologies for the pricing of kidney beans. Still, if we were to revise the price of the kidney beans and soya mince, they would still be highly inefficient - eggs are still 40% and 152% more efficient.

    There is no false dichotomy, considering also that we were also talking about the price of the food given that the consumer is not well off. Doubling the amount of food to reach the 2500 calorie mark would result in doubling the cost, not to mention lacking in a lot of essential vitamins and nutrients, and at more than £2 per person, the cost price is actually extremely high for someone who cooks at home.

    So I'm still not convinced.
    Yes, it's a false dichotomy, you asked about protein based foods. There are plenty of foods that are higher kcal (apart from peanut butter) and lower in protein.
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    (Original post by A Mysterious Lord)
    Nothing worse than a militant vegan, what I choose to eat is not subject to anybody's moral jurisdiction.
    Yes it is. How is it not?
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Again, try replying to the content in the OP.
    I didn't want to hence why I didn't.
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    Are you a vegan perchance?
    are you profesh now?
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    hi
    hi
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    (Original post by Lyrical Prodigy)
    hi
    hi
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    (Original post by Lyrical Prodigy)
    hi
    Kinda surprised to see a mod derail a thread.
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by Bupdeeboowah)

    So I'm still not convinced.
    it's unethical to eat eggs. Watch the op video!
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    I haven't watched the video but I'm guessing it just shows what farming looks like if done badly as all these veggie propaganda videos do.

    I have been to a few chicken farms and even the enriched cages aren't that bad.

    So yes I eat eggs and no, I won't stop.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    vegan here so not really
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    it's unethical to eat eggs. Watch the op video!
    I did, and I think that is just an unfortunate outcome which is however still necessary to feed a large population.
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    (Original post by loveleest)
    You are not enlightening anyone please. You are forcing opinions on others
    Eggs are very nutritious.
    Not really tbh.
    I eat eggs everyday and I still have low cholesterol, I am active and eat mainly healthy foods
    I'm not guilty and I'm sure many others aren't.
    He shared real footage of how modern poultry farming completely mistreats the lives of new born chickenss. How is that an opinion?!
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    (Original post by DiceTheSlice)
    He shared real footage of how modern poultry farming completely mistreats the lives of new born chickenss. How is that an opinion?!
    I know, but I still love and eat eggs x
 
 
 
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