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    (Original post by Howard)
    Well, I can't imagine 10 quid a day providing a life on luxury. Maybe it's "enough" if you want to live on egg and chips and boxes of broken biscuits.
    I make a lot more and would love egg and chips and broken biscuits everyday
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    No, I didn't think you did have a trust fund since, as I suspected, your family is not 'upper class'.
    Some people have trust funds for less than 100k.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    I make a lot more and would love egg and chips and broken biscuits everyday
    I was raised on a diet of egg and chips and boxes of broken biscuits; (and Findus crispy pancakes - do they still make those?) I guess it comes with the territory of having really high flying parents (a carpenter and a hairdresser).
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I was raised on a diet of egg and chips and boxes of broken biscuits; (and Findus crispy pancakes - do they still make those?) I guess it comes with the territory of having really high flying parents (a carpenter and a hairdresser).
    That is the life (not sure before my time maybe lol).
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    No, I didn't think you did have a trust fund since, as I suspected, your family is not 'upper class'.


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    So all upper class have trust funds? ****ing fantastic logic
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    That is the life (not sure before my time maybe lol).
    Yes, I've probably got a few years on you.

    They were like a breadcrumbed pancake filled with white gunk that was supposed to be chicken and mushroom which you dropped in a "deep fat frier" Everybody had a deep fat frier then - the most unhealthy way of cooking ever invented (oil got changed once every six months) It's amazing I didn't have a heart attack at 10.
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    No, I didn't think you did have a trust fund since, as I suspected, your family is not 'upper class'.


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    You aren't worth my time to argue with, honestly I opened a thread for healthy debate, yet you made it personal, how very low of you
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Yes, I've probably got a few years on you.

    They were like a breadcrumbed pancake filled with white gunk that was supposed to be chicken and mushroom which you dropped in a "deep fat frier" Everybody had a deep fat frier then - the most unhealthy way of cooking ever invented (oil got changed once every six months) It's amazing I didn't have a heart attack at 10.
    Suppose it's was healthier than a mars bar? +1

    P.S most the barbers i know have been quite affluent i think their jobs are quite secure too.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Yes, I've probably got a few years on you.

    They were like a breadcrumbed pancake filled with white gunk that was supposed to be chicken and mushroom which you dropped in a "deep fat frier" Everybody had a deep fat frier then - the most unhealthy way of cooking ever invented (oil got changed once every six months) It's amazing I didn't have a heart attack at 10.


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    Thats souns like how Im gonna cook at uni
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    Suppose it's was healthier than a mars bar? +1

    P.S most the barbers i know have been quite affluent i think their jobs are quite secure too.
    Barbering is a great profession these days; especially since we've returned to traditional men's barbering. As a matter of fact I went to my barber today; haircut, beard trim, and razer shave - hot towels, spot of aftershave - $65 plus 20% tip. Best barber in Canada (well, in Regina anyway) and worth every penny. Feel a million dollars every time I go to those guys. They even have a fridge of cold beer for their customers. No women allowed - they don't cut women's hair or employ women barbers.

    The guy that did me did a six month barbering course in the US, packed up his trucking business, and has never looked back.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Barbering is a great profession these days; especially since we've returned to traditional men's barbering. As a matter of fact I went to my barber today; haircut, beard trim, and razer shave - hot towels, spot of aftershave - $65 plus 20% tip. Best barber in Canada (well, in Regina anyway) and worth every penny. Feel a million dollars every time I go to those guys. They even have a fridge of cold beer for their customers. No women allowed - they don't cut women's hair or employ women barbers.

    The guy that did me did a six month barbering course in the US, packed up his trucking business, and has never looked back.
    Good on him! think it will remain lucrative for a long time yet!
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    Good on him! think it will remain lucrative for a long time yet!
    That and tattooing. Both good professions in my opinion. All these folks off at university studying humanities degrees and ending up as baristas at Starbucks and I've got friends who a barbers (6 months training in the US - cost $10,000) and tattoo artists (a year apprenticeship) who go out then, rent out a small shop, and make some serious coin.

    I think traditional barbering is the better of the two - tattooing is dying out a bit and getting a bit saturated with artists these days.

    There's always money to be made with your hands.
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    I say we should handle benefits the way the Americans do it.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    That and tattooing. Both good professions in my opinion. All these folks off at university studying humanities degrees and ending up as baristas at Starbucks and I've got friends who a barbers (6 months training in the US - cost $10,000) and tattoo artists (a year apprenticeship) who go out then, rent out a small shop, and make some serious coin.

    I think traditional barbering is the better of the two - tattooing is dying out a bit and getting a bit saturated with artists these days.

    There's always money to be made with your hands.
    True it's all about location though and prime location can cost big bucks. Or finding an under valued location can take months but not long before competition arrives. But should make a fair few pounds until then.

    Still beats making coffee for minimum wage (or about)
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    (Original post by sw651)
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    You aren't worth my time to argue with, honestly I opened a thread for healthy debate, yet you made it personal, how very low of you

    To be fair, you raised the issue of your family and class which you obviously consider to be germane to the discussion, so you can hardly cry foul, when those factors come under scrutiny.
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    To be fair, you raised the issue of your family and class which you obviously consider to be germane to the discussion, so you can hardly cry foul, when those factors come under scrutiny.
    This. OP constantly howling when people question the "examples" he gives seems to be the lady protest too much, methinks :holmes:
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    Depends on if they seriously need it, like people with disabilities for example.
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    (Original post by Dabo_26)
    I say we should handle benefits the way the Americans do it.
    Pockets of third world poverty in a rich western country.
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    They're not 'handouts'. Many people who claim benefits have paid into the system - a system that's designed for everyone in the eventuality of them being unable to find work.

    As I've already stated, there are schemes in place whereby claimants must do community work or lose their benefits. They have however been heavily criticised since the number of people who are helped by such schemes is minuscule, with some research showing they actually hinder people from getting back into paid work.

    The schemes are also expensive and cost the 'hardworking taxayer' far more than if the unemployed were simply left to their own devices.
    I didn't call them handouts to insult the poor, It was an expression. As for your point on the community service stuff, fair enough if it's too expensive all my concern is with the current system is that plenty of people who go into it end up in a loop as the lack of work can demotivate people. Sitting down all day with nothing to do sounds lovely on paper but in practice it's nothing but depressing which in turn can cause people to give up job searching all together.
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    It depends on the person. If you are unable to work then of course you are entitled to benefits. If you are able to work but you are to lazy to get a job then no you don't deserve benefits.
 
 
 
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