Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    Hey everyone, I am a medical student who doesn't really have time to do any proper, paid tutoring, however I am interested in teaching and helping people in general. I have tutored before, so if anyone is stuck on any GCSE/AS/A2 biology (or chemistry too for that matter) then feel free to ask and I'll help. Also if anyone has any questions about applying to medical school then I can help there too as I was in that position only last year, so it's fresh in my mind. I got 4 A's at AS and 3 A*s at A2 (bio, chem, maths, all above 95%)
    Hello!
    Can you guide me on exam technique for IGCSE Biology?
    Also can you tell me a gcse level explanation of ultrafiltration in the nephrons? Thanks a bunch.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hamza.sheikh)
    Hello!
    Can you guide me on exam technique for IGCSE Biology?
    Also can you tell me a gcse level explanation of ultrafiltration in the nephrons? Thanks a bunch.
    You might need to be more specific on what you mean by exam technique, because each exam will have different techniques, also I didn't do iGCSE, so I don't know if it differs from regular GCSEs or not

    As for ultrfiltration, there isn't really much you need to know, even at uni level we didn't go into much detail. But basically, the glomerulus is a cluster of capillaries adjacent to the bowman's capsule in the nephron. The pressure in these capillaries is high, and that high pressure forces out many components of the blood, such as ions, water and small proteins. These then undergo reabsorption in the tubules of the nephron.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    You might need to be more specific on what you mean by exam technique, because each exam will have different techniques, also I didn't do iGCSE, so I don't know if it differs from regular GCSEs or not

    As for ultrfiltration, there isn't really much you need to know, even at uni level we didn't go into much detail. But basically, the glomerulus is a cluster of capillaries adjacent to the bowman's capsule in the nephron. The pressure in these capillaries is high, and that high pressure forces out many components of the blood, such as ions, water and small proteins. These then undergo reabsorption in the tubules of the nephron.
    I mean most of the time I know what the question is asking and I even have the answer for it but I'm not able to exactly get those markscheme points.

    Ohh and what about afferent and efferent arterioles? What is their role?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Not sure if it's been asked yet, but between now and exams (about 4-6 weeks) how long, and how did you revise and ensure that you got 90%+ to secure those A*'s? thank you
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hunnybeebee)
    Not sure if it's been asked yet, but between now and exams (about 4-6 weeks) how long, and how did you revise and ensure that you got 90%+ to secure those A*'s? thank you
    So I did the bulk of my revision over easter, I did a little bit over christmas for the mocks, but as far as I remember, I don't think I spent much time on them. Easter was mainly spent making notes, which was relatively decent revision, but after the easter holidays, I didn't revise because school was setting us school work still, and we also had our EMPAs and ISAs. After the EMPAs and ISAs were done, that's when I properly started revision, as in committing stuff to memory, by that time our lessons were just revision lessons anyway so I had nothing else going on but revision. However, I got ill on our last day of school and was ill for half of my study leave, so I didn't do any revision during that time, which meant I had to cram in the final week before my exams!

    In terms of how did I revise, I mainly used the textbooks for science and past papers for maths. I also used wikipedia here and there for some more in depth explanations on stuff. By the time it was a week before my exam, I was cramming and doing past papers. I would spend a couple of hours on each unit, and then do a past paper. There were enough papers for about 1 a day, I saved the most recent papers for the night before the exam.

    So yh that was it, I would advise getting coursework out the way, and then once that's done, focus on revising for exams, and save the past past papers for a week or so before the exams start
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hamza.sheikh)
    I mean most of the time I know what the question is asking and I even have the answer for it but I'm not able to exactly get those markscheme points.

    Ohh and what about afferent and efferent arterioles? What is their role?
    Afferent arterioles carry blood to the glomerulus and efferent arterioles carry blood away from the glomerulsu (think of it as A comes before E in the alphabet). Their role is to maintain the blood pressure in the glomerulus so that ultrafiltration keeps happening properly
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    So I did the bulk of my revision over easter, I did a little bit over christmas for the mocks, but as far as I remember, I don't think I spent much time on them. Easter was mainly spent making notes, which was relatively decent revision, but after the easter holidays, I didn't revise because school was setting us school work still, and we also had our EMPAs and ISAs. After the EMPAs and ISAs were done, that's when I properly started revision, as in committing stuff to memory, by that time our lessons were just revision lessons anyway so I had nothing else going on but revision. However, I got ill on our last day of school and was ill for half of my study leave, so I didn't do any revision during that time, which meant I had to cram in the final week before my exams!

    In terms of how did I revise, I mainly used the textbooks for science and past papers for maths. I also used wikipedia here and there for some more in depth explanations on stuff. By the time it was a week before my exam, I was cramming and doing past papers. I would spend a couple of hours on each unit, and then do a past paper. There were enough papers for about 1 a day, I saved the most recent papers for the night before the exam.

    So yh that was it, I would advise getting coursework out the way, and then once that's done, focus on revising for exams, and save the past past papers for a week or so before the exams start
    sounds like you did quite a bit of cramming but obviously it worked! I think I'll do past papers up to 2012 and the ones after that for the week before like you said. Thank you lots and well done on getting into medical school! Hopefully I will get into biomed
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    AortaStudyMore Did you do A-level Biology with Edexcel? If so, I'm really struggling with the core practicals any chance you could help me out? I'm mainly struggling with remembering the procedures of all the experiments
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    AortaStudyMore Did you do A-level Biology with Edexcel? If so, I'm really struggling with the core practicals any chance you could help me out? I'm mainly struggling with remembering the procedures of all the experiments
    I did AQA, in a time when we didn't have to know practicals for the exam. Sorry buddy, if you're struggling to remember stuff though, I recommend making flash cards, they really work. If you're struggling with understanding, then you're best asking a teacher (they're paid to help you on this stuff after all!)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hunnybeebee)
    sounds like you did quite a bit of cramming but obviously it worked! I think I'll do past papers up to 2012 and the ones after that for the week before like you said. Thank you lots and well done on getting into medical school! Hopefully I will get into biomed
    Good luck!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    I did AQA, in a time when we didn't have to know practicals for the exam. Sorry buddy, if you're struggling to remember stuff though, I recommend making flash cards, they really work. If you're struggling with understanding, then you're best asking a teacher (they're paid to help you on this stuff after all!)
    Ah no worries. Yeah I think I will have to make a few flashcards relating to the core practicals and just keep reading over them. Thanks a lot for taking the time to reply to me!
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    AortaStudyMore Did you do A-level Biology with Edexcel? If so, I'm really struggling with the core practicals any chance you could help me out? I'm mainly struggling with remembering the procedures of all the experiments
    When learning the core practicals bullet point and highlight to make it stick. Find previous exam questions on the core practicals and learn the marking points so you don't overload on unnecessary info. Make sure you know your AS practicals too.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PsychoD)
    When learning the core practicals bullet point and highlight to make it stick. Find previous exam questions on the core practicals and learn the marking points so you don't overload on unnecessary info. Make sure you know your AS practicals too.
    Thank you! I'm actually doing AS-level Bio (under the new spec) but will definitely try bullet pointing the procedures of the core practicals and work through exam questions

    Are you on the old Edexcel spec?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Thank you! I'm actually doing AS-level Bio (under the new spec) but will definitely try bullet pointing the procedures of the core practicals and work through exam questions

    Are you on the old Edexcel spec?
    I completed Edexcel bio last year (so old spec). I haven't looked at the new spec so have no idea what you're practicals are If you're doing as this year and a2 next year on the new spec I can't be very useful! Best of luck
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PsychoD)
    I completed Edexcel bio last year (so old spec). I haven't looked at the new spec so have no idea what you're practicals are If you're doing as this year and a2 next year on the new spec I can't be very useful! Best of luck
    The new spec uses the same practicals as the old spec. So any advice would be useful to me
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by aortastudymore)
    okay so, you're kind of right, but what you're forgetting here is that strength is on a spectrum, anything that doesn't fully ionise in solution is weak, and something that fully ionises in solution is strong. However, something that is weak can still be comparitively strong compared to another weak acid (or base). So yes, you're almost right in saying that a strong acid has a weak conjugate base, but technically, what happens is the stronger the acid is, the weaker the conjugate base is. So a strong acid will make a weak conjugate base, but that conjugate base is on a spectrum from very weak, to not so weak. Likewise, nh3 (which is the conjugate base of nh4+) is actually quite a strong weak base. It's still technically weak, because it doesn't fully ionise, but it actually ionises quite a lot compared to other weak bases. So nh3's kb is relatively high, but the very fact that it has a kb means that it is a weak base. Now, ka of the conjugate base = kw/kb, if you do some maths, this will tell you that the ka of nh4+ is very low, so therefore it is a very weak acid.

    So in summary, the stronger the acid, the weaker the conjugate base, and the stronger the base, the weaker the conjugate acid. But weakness is on a spectrum, so you can have weak bases with weak conjugate acids
    ohhammgee thankyou so much!!
    Can't even tell you how helpful you are <3
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    Hey everyone, I am a medical student who doesn't really have time to do any proper, paid tutoring, however I am interested in teaching and helping people in general. I have tutored before, so if anyone is stuck on any GCSE/AS/A2 biology (or chemistry too for that matter) then feel free to ask and I'll help. Also if anyone has any questions about applying to medical school then I can help there too as I was in that position only last year, so it's fresh in my mind. I got 4 A's at AS and 3 A*s at A2 (bio, chem, maths, all above 95%)
    How did you revise for your as exams
    I do biology so how did you revise? In order to achieve a grade A! - also you did amazing!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by goal101)
    How did you revise for your as exams
    I do biology so how did you revise? In order to achieve a grade A! - also you did amazing!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Haha thanks, someone did ask me this recently, so I'll keep it brief, make notes before EMPA/ISA, then revise the notes after the coursework, and then do past papers in the week or so leading up to exams
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, can you give me tips for the 25 mark biology essays? They require so much detail and they could be literally anything, so does this mean I need to know all my AS knowledge too? It's stressing me out!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Student1507)
    Hi, can you give me tips for the 25 mark biology essays? They require so much detail and they could be literally anything, so does this mean I need to know all my AS knowledge too? It's stressing me out!
    Again, look back a few pages and you'll see the advise I gave to someone else regarding the essay It does include AS knowledge, so it'll be worth maybe dedicating a day to revising some AS. I personally didn't, but I knew my AS stuff pretty well without revision, if you don't quite know enough then it might be worth revisiting some stuff! The essay is pretty awful, and you say that it requires so much knowledge, but if you've revised for the exam properly then you should have that knowledge anyway :P You shouldn't need to revise for the essay separately, everything that comes up in the essay will be part of the course that you're revising for.

    If there's anything else, let me know
 
 
 
Poll
Who is your favourite TV detective?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.