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    (Original post by BaronK)
    If you're training in your proper tempo/sweet spot zone then it will certainly help you, it ultimately increases your threshold power. And that's what's most important for the longer climbs obviously. Sub 1 minute/sprint intervals aren't going to help you much on a half hour long climb.
    The only way to increase your threshold is to actually do intervals above your threshold. If you constantly ride at or below your threshold you'll never improve it.

    (Original post by doodle_333)
    thanks so you think it would be possible to stay fit enough to tackle proper climbs (I know there's nothing too crazy in Mallorca) day after day doing sprints?
    You can't do proper sprint intervals day after day but yes. Sprint intervals can help your climbing regardless of the length of climb. If you increase your threshold by 30 watts for example, then you also raise your zone 3 and 4 power by 30 watts and Z3/4 are typically what you'll be climbing in. I'm not saying 15-60 second efforts are the only thing you should do but they are absolutely one of the most time efficient training sessions.
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    thanks I'll probably need both, as much as I like climbing I'm terrible at it!
    I saw a video on this but can't remember which one. Whole list of videos you can look at though;
    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...GCN%20climbing
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    (Original post by Roobsa)
    The only way to increase your threshold is to actually do intervals above your threshold. If you constantly ride at or below your threshold you'll never improve it.



    You can't do proper sprint intervals day after day but yes. Sprint intervals can help your climbing regardless of the length of climb. If you increase your threshold by 30 watts for example, then you also raise your zone 3 and 4 power by 30 watts and Z3/4 are typically what you'll be climbing in. I'm not saying 15-60 second efforts are the only thing you should do but they are absolutely one of the most time efficient training sessions.
    If that was true sweetspot training wouldn't be a thing. Riding at or above your threshold is just the quickest way to raise it but builds the quickest fatigue.
    Just look at what pros do/recommend. Even your own magazine says so.

    I haven't seen anywhere that suggests doing sprints is the best way to improve your threshold.
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    (Original post by Roobsa)
    The only way to increase your threshold is to actually do intervals above your threshold. If you constantly ride at or below your threshold you'll never improve it.

    You can't do proper sprint intervals day after day but yes. Sprint intervals can help your climbing regardless of the length of climb. If you increase your threshold by 30 watts for example, then you also raise your zone 3 and 4 power by 30 watts and Z3/4 are typically what you'll be climbing in. I'm not saying 15-60 second efforts are the only thing you should do but they are absolutely one of the most time efficient training sessions.
    (Original post by alexs2602)
    I saw a video on this but can't remember which one. Whole list of videos you can look at though;
    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...GCN%20climbing
    thank you both feeling a bit more confident
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    Anyone got a good way to narrow down the right saddle for you? Right now I think I've got a general idea what I want but it is quite general and I did just look at the most popular reasonable priced saddles. Planning to go try it out before I buy it but beyond that don't have a great idea. Right now I'm looking at a saddle with a cutout. I think narrower [than my current saddle] would probably be good too but couldn't be much more specific than that. One I'm looking at is £40 so I think that's pretty decent.
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    I'm doing the Dirty Kanza 200 tomorrow - it's one of my main goals for this year. Should be around 14 hours of gravel racing through this. It's both exciting and terrifying.
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    (Original post by Roobsa)
    I'm doing the Dirty Kanza 200 tomorrow - it's one of my main goals for this year. Should be around 14 hours of gravel racing through this. It's both exciting and terrifying.
    Good luck!

    (Original post by alexs2602)
    Anyone got a good way to narrow down the right saddle for you? Right now I think I've got a general idea what I want but it is quite general and I did just look at the most popular reasonable priced saddles. Planning to go try it out before I buy it but beyond that don't have a great idea. Right now I'm looking at a saddle with a cutout. I think narrower [than my current saddle] would probably be good too but couldn't be much more specific than that. One I'm looking at is £40 so I think that's pretty decent.
    Had a long conversation about this with a customer the other day, sadly while you can get measured up for it, it is as much about trial and error as what should work, might not always work. Try before you buy is a very good idea.


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    (Original post by dhr90)
    Had a long conversation about this with a customer the other day, sadly while you can get measured up for it, it is as much about trial and error as what should work, might not always work. Try before you buy is a very good idea.


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    I gather the best way is to find a retailer with a generous return policy if possible


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    (Original post by BaronK)
    If that was true sweetspot training wouldn't be a thing. Riding at or above your threshold is just the quickest way to raise it but builds the quickest fatigue.
    Just look at what pros do/recommend. Even your own magazine says so.

    I haven't seen anywhere that suggests doing sprints is the best way to improve your threshold.
    GCN is a pretty big advocate of interval training for increasing FTP - not flat out sprints but solid 100% effort blocks of 30-40 seconds between 2 min blocks of 75% output
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    Hi guys!

    Just got back from cycling from Brighton to a village along the coast called Rottingdean- there's nothing better than cycling along the sea on a beautiful sunny day. Anyway, I was wondering if any of you are going to be taken part in any events this summer? I'm going to be taking part in the Birmingham Bikeathon in July https://bloodwise.org.uk/event-chall...gham-bikeathon it gives me a chance to catch-up with some old friend who made the move up north a few years ago and also to raise awareness for a cause which is close to my heart! I have an ambitious idea to go cycling in the Italian Alps this summer as well before starting to look for a job.
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    (Original post by Ed Phelan)
    Hi guys!

    Just got back from cycling from Brighton to a village along the coast called Rottingdean- there's nothing better than cycling along the sea on a beautiful sunny day. Anyway, I was wondering if any of you are going to be taken part in any events this summer? I'm going to be taking part in the Birmingham Bikeathon in July https://bloodwise.org.uk/event-chall...gham-bikeathon it gives me a chance to catch-up with some old friend who made the move up north a few years ago and also to raise awareness for a cause which is close to my heart! I have an ambitious idea to go cycling in the Italian Alps this summer as well before starting to look for a job.
    Nice!

    I'm riding in the Prudential100 this July... but currently my back aches like a ***** if I cycle more than 30-60km so not sure how to fix that..!

    Would like to do some sort of cycling holiday as well.... but no idea how to go about preparing for one, or indeed what sort of bike I'd need since I'd like to be mobile on my road bike and see lots of places... but also need to bring clothes and things which requires panniers, rucksacks and all that nonsense
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    I'm riding in the Prudential100 this July... but currently my back aches like a ***** if I cycle more than 30-60km so not sure how to fix that..!
    Go see a physio. Get a bike fit. Stretch more.

    Boulder is a super fun place to ride bikes.
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    Nice!

    I'm riding in the Prudential100 this July... but currently my back aches like a ***** if I cycle more than 30-60km so not sure how to fix that..!

    Would like to do some sort of cycling holiday as well.... but no idea how to go about preparing for one, or indeed what sort of bike I'd need since I'd like to be mobile on my road bike and see lots of places... but also need to bring clothes and things which requires panniers, rucksacks and all that nonsense
    I assume you're not a long term cyclist with an injury? my back took some time to get used to long rides, I found working on my flexibility helped and working on core strength so I kept my back more stable. Roobsa definitely has the right idea with a bike fit, I am sooo much comfier since putting my seat up to where it should be!

    You'd have to decide for a holiday whether you want to pay someone to sort your stuff and join a proper tour, carry all your stuff around with you every day or set up in the middle of somewhere so you have access to lots of different nice riding. I've carried stuff in a rucksack (packed light! 25lt rucksack) and personally found it made riding much tougher and I was less comfy on the bike but you might be able to get used to it. I prefer to be in one place and just go from there, I've done the peaks, snowdonia and majorca twice, would recommend all three. Also, cycling holidays are just fun, I genuinely cannot understand why someone would choose to sit on the same beach every day for a week rather than doing something like a cycling trip.
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I assume you're not a long term cyclist with an injury? my back took some time to get used to long rides, I found working on my flexibility helped and working on core strength so I kept my back more stable. Roobsa definitely has the right idea with a bike fit, I am sooo much comfier since putting my seat up to where it should be!

    You'd have to decide for a holiday whether you want to pay someone to sort your stuff and join a proper tour, carry all your stuff around with you every day or set up in the middle of somewhere so you have access to lots of different nice riding. I've carried stuff in a rucksack (packed light! 25lt rucksack) and personally found it made riding much tougher and I was less comfy on the bike but you might be able to get used to it. I prefer to be in one place and just go from there, I've done the peaks, snowdonia and majorca twice, would recommend all three. Also, cycling holidays are just fun, I genuinely cannot understand why someone would choose to sit on the same beach every day for a week rather than doing something like a cycling trip.
    Yeah not a long-term cyclist, I'm only just getting into duration cycling really - though I rowed previously. I definitely had my seat waaay too high at first and lowering it has helped, I might lower it a bit more but it's incredibly hilly where I live and I don't want to transfer the problem to my knees instead as my bike is only 7-speed... :/

    So to get some context to you guys, when you've finished a 2-3 hour ride does your back not ache at all? I.e. is it something I should negate entirely or is it something that I can reduce and also become more accustomed too. Personally the only thing that aches for me is my back, my legs are pretty strong so I have quite a high power:weight ratio though it slows me a bit on the climbs

    Ok thanks for the tip! Yeah the idea of basing myself somewhere would be good, I've ridden with a rucksack before and again it was pretty *****ing on my spine
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    Yeah not a long-term cyclist, I'm only just getting into duration cycling really - though I rowed previously. I definitely had my seat waaay too high at first and lowering it has helped, I might lower it a bit more but it's incredibly hilly where I live and I don't want to transfer the problem to my knees instead as my bike is only 7-speed... :/

    So to get some context to you guys, when you've finished a 2-3 hour ride does your back not ache at all? I.e. is it something I should negate entirely or is it something that I can reduce and also become more accustomed too. Personally the only thing that aches for me is my back, my legs are pretty strong so I have quite a high power:weight ratio though it slows me a bit on the climbs

    Ok thanks for the tip! Yeah the idea of basing myself somewhere would be good, I've ridden with a rucksack before and again it was pretty *****ing on my spine
    Is your stem slammed?
    Sounds like you might be a bit stretched out. You can ride like it, but it'll take some getting used to and would need to work on your flexibility. Would be better off raising your handlebars a little bit.
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    So to get some context to you guys, when you've finished a 2-3 hour ride does your back not ache at all? I.e. is it something I should negate entirely or is it something that I can reduce and also become more accustomed too. Personally the only thing that aches for me is my back, my legs are pretty strong so I have quite a high power:weight ratio though it slows me a bit on the climbs
    I did a 14 hour ride last weekend and had zero back ache. It's something you absolutely should get sorted as it can and will ruin your riding experience.
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    (Original post by BaronK)
    Is your stem slammed?
    Sounds like you might be a bit stretched out. You can ride like it, but it'll take some getting used to and would need to work on your flexibility. Would be better off raising your handlebars a little bit.
    No not slammed, I've got two spacers beneath my stem. Flexibility would be good, how flexible are you? I can touch my toes, but not comfortably

    I've noticed it's not so bad when I'm on smooth roads, and I can cycle on a turbo for hours without issue.. but when I get onto ****ed up roads (not potholes, just a lot of bumps and vibration) it quickly takes its toll

    (Original post by Roobsa)
    I did a 14 hour ride last weekend and had zero back ache. It's something you absolutely should get sorted as it can and will ruin your riding experience.
    Oh wow, ok thanks. I've never ridden in a cycling club so it's been hard for me to know what's normal or abnormal
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    No not slammed, I've got two spacers beneath my stem. Flexibility would be good, how flexible are you? I can touch my toes, but not comfortably

    I've noticed it's not so bad when I'm on smooth roads, and I can cycle on a turbo for hours without issue.. but when I get onto ****ed up roads (not potholes, just a lot of bumps and vibration) it quickly takes its toll



    Oh wow, ok thanks. I've never ridden in a cycling club so it's been hard for me to know what's normal or abnormal
    I can't touch my toes. Any spacers above?
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    (Original post by BaronK)
    I can't touch my toes. Any spacers above?
    Nope, and the stem is already clearing the top of the forks by half a cm or so (it's how I bought it)

    I have a feeling it's probably to do with seat height still, also when I'm pedalling uphill it's far less painful so I think I might need to keep my cadence lower on the flats, so that my feet can take more of the bumps from the road - sometimes it feels like I'm just bouncing along on the seat like a bag of potatoes if I'm going quite fast and my legs are hitting 100rpm or so
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    Nope, and the stem is already clearing the top of the forks by half a cm or so (it's how I bought it)

    I have a feeling it's probably to do with seat height still, also when I'm pedalling uphill it's far less painful so I think I might need to keep my cadence lower on the flats, so that my feet can take more of the bumps from the road - sometimes it feels like I'm just bouncing along on the seat like a bag of potatoes if I'm going quite fast and my legs are hitting 100rpm or so
    Lowering your cadence though won't do your lower back any favours.
 
 
 
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