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    Totally disagree.

    Adversity is what made us great and create the Empire.

    Endless summer and luxury made other peoples of the world docile.
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    (Original post by Parx)
    Yes their original heritage is mixed up into 4 cultures, malay, chinese and they speak several languages including Singlish. However, they ALL buy into Singapore's culture. That is why they are Singaporeans, because they have no other agendas before that of respecting the country they are in and abiding by the traits and customs of it. You simply cannot say that about the type of immigrants we have here. Oh and bt the malay and chinese and so on are the older people. All the young people in Singapore are largely born and bred in Singapore and Singaporeans. No opposing cultures of economic migrants or the like. Just Singaporeans.
    I live in Singapore. Your views are not on par with that of Singapore's. As of June 2014, there were 3.87 million residents (including 0.53 million non-citizens) and 1.60 million non-residents in Singapore. That means that as of 2014, 61% of the population were citizens of Singapore. According to the 2011 census, 36.7% of London's population was foreign born. The stats of both countries are pretty similar.

    I don't understand what you mean by "Oh and bt the malay and chinese and so on are the older people." Every generation of Singaporeans is made up of Malays, Chinese, Indians and other races. You are right to say most residents buy into Singapore's culture. But that has less to do with with the 'type' of foreigners that Singapore attracts versus the 'type' that London attracts. It has more to do with how Singapore does not tolerate xenophobia or racism of any sort.

    In Singapore, we all accept that with globalisation, our country's culture is bound to change. As Singaporeans, we try to promote our local culture as much as possible while being respectful of others' cultural requirements as well. We reach out to our foreigners. In that way, they are more likely to see our side of things. Similarly, we look to explore their cultures as well. There are a multitude of places in Singapore where we can explore other cultures.You don't seem willing to compromise at all. It's a matter of sheer luck that you were born in the UK. Could you try putting yourself in the shoes of the immigrants? They're likely feeling ostracised and unwelcome- probably why they don't share your culture. You should try to gain a better understanding of their side of things. Maybe then you can claim to have the same views as Singapore. As of the 2011 census, the majority of the population in London is still UK-born. You say you're not a racist. In line with that, you shouldn't be having a problem.

    (Original post by Parx)
    I feel so disappointed that I can't even share any cultural similarities to the people I am living with, in my homeland! And you are implying that I'm some racist. Pathetic. And you say minority in one or two towns. I am already a minority in London. I'm a minority in Luton, Bradford, Southall .. lots of places that will only grow more and more.
    Yet you speak of being a minority in London. The UK-born population is made up of whites, blacks, and many other races and ethnicities. If you're not a racist and merely disagree with the fact that immigration is eroding your British culture, then you should be able to share cultural similarities with all of these people who were born and brought up in the UK- who make up a majority in London.

    Slightly off the topic- I'm not trying to persuade you to reach my exact viewpoint. I understand that you're objecting to the destruction of British culture. I'm not British so I won't claim to completely understand the whole situation. I'm trying to help you see an outsider's (from a country that you claim embodies your argument) point of view on the matter. Take it or leave it. Singapore is successful because we embrace different cultures. We don't try to hold on to one culture and pray everyone buys into it. Singapore's culture was diverse to begin with because of the many races and religions it started with, and it keeps getting more diverse due to globalisation, which we accept and embrace. It's quite different from the point you're trying to make.

    I also understand that you have your intellectual views and that you're making a point based on your intellectual opinion. That does not condone personal attacks and derogatory comments that don't further your argument in any way or form. Is it so hard to be civil? Disagreement is healthy and common in many ways, but the way in which you argue is demeaning, opinionated to the point where you put down every other viewpoint with little consideration, and just plain rude. You posted in a forum. Where people share their diverse opinions. If you've got such a problem with other viewpoints, why post?!?!?!?!?

    On a final note, If you want to stay a member of this modern world, I suggest you open yourself up to a little bit of change.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    soz m8 but the majority of london are moody antisocial sods u cant deny :/
    maybe a slim majority

    but it does vary a lot with where you go
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    maybe a slim majority

    but it does vary a lot with where you go
    Slim majority :mmm:

    But you are right. Once you're past zone 5 people actually make eye contact with you.

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    the UK is a fantastic place to live. you're pretty free to live however you like.. the biggest gripe i would have is that the weather is a bit **** but at least we don't get much in the way of earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes etc.
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    (Original post by coolkid17)
    I live in Singapore. Your views are not on par with that of Singapore's. As of June 2014, there were 3.87 million residents (including 0.53 million non-citizens) and 1.60 million non-residents in Singapore. That means that as of 2014, 61% of the population were citizens of Singapore. According to the 2011 census, 36.7% of London's population was foreign born. The stats of both countries are pretty similar.

    I don't understand what you mean by "Oh and bt the malay and chinese and so on are the older people." Every generation of Singaporeans is made up of Malays, Chinese, Indians and other races. You are right to say most residents buy into Singapore's culture. But that has less to do with with the 'type' of foreigners that Singapore attracts versus the 'type' that London attracts. It has more to do with how Singapore does not tolerate xenophobia or racism of any sort.

    In Singapore, we all accept that with globalisation, our country's culture is bound to change. As Singaporeans, we try to promote our local culture as much as possible while being respectful of others' cultural requirements as well. We reach out to our foreigners. In that way, they are more likely to see our side of things. Similarly, we look to explore their cultures as well. There are a multitude of places in Singapore where we can explore other cultures.You don't seem willing to compromise at all. It's a matter of sheer luck that you were born in the UK. Could you try putting yourself in the shoes of the immigrants? They're likely feeling ostracised and unwelcome- probably why they don't share your culture. You should try to gain a better understanding of their side of things. Maybe then you can claim to have the same views as Singapore. As of the 2011 census, the majority of the population in London is still UK-born. You say you're not a racist. In line with that, you shouldn't be having a problem.



    Yet you speak of being a minority in London. The UK-born population is made up of whites, blacks, and many other races and ethnicities. If you're not a racist and merely disagree with the fact that immigration is eroding your British culture, then you should be able to share cultural similarities with all of these people who were born and brought up in the UK- who make up a majority in London.

    Slightly off the topic- I'm not trying to persuade you to reach my exact viewpoint. I understand that you're objecting to the destruction of British culture. I'm not British so I won't claim to completely understand the whole situation. I'm trying to help you see an outsider's (from a country that you claim embodies your argument) point of view on the matter. Take it or leave it. Singapore is successful because we embrace different cultures. We don't try to hold on to one culture and pray everyone buys into it. Singapore's culture was diverse to begin with because of the many races and religions it started with, and it keeps getting more diverse due to globalisation, which we accept and embrace. It's quite different from the point you're trying to make.

    I also understand that you have your intellectual views and that you're making a point based on your intellectual opinion. That does not condone personal attacks and derogatory comments that don't further your argument in any way or form. Is it so hard to be civil? Disagreement is healthy and common in many ways, but the way in which you argue is demeaning, opinionated to the point where you put down every other viewpoint with little consideration, and just plain rude. You posted in a forum. Where people share their diverse opinions. If you've got such a problem with other viewpoints, why post?!?!?!?!?

    On a final note, If you want to stay a member of this modern world, I suggest you open yourself up to a little bit of change.
    But the thing is that Singapore's culture is not being threatened in any way at all. Not at all. Your people as you say come from different cultures - but they buy into the Singapore way of life. So it's easy for you to say the things you say. Yes Singapore accepts different cultures (I have been to the Little India and China Town and all those cultural places), and so does England! My point is that the tolerance has gone WAY too far. Islam now has great dominance in areas and they are implementing a way of life across significant areas, and ultimately it is breeding contempt. It's NOT like that in Singapore. The chinese, malay and Indians etc are not trying to spread their power in places. You don't have Eastern Europeans from Hungary and Albania coming to Singapore to claim benefits, clean toilets or work in coffee shops, overpopulating the labour markets and sending portions of money home. Come and spend 3 months in Tower Hamlets, Whitechapel, Southall, Tooting, Wembley, Luton or Bradford and then comment on the subject. Until then - you don't have the experience to make a realistic comparison.

    You're painting me out to be ill-tolerant of other cultures. That's just not true. I am ill-tolerant of mass immigration and people forcing their beliefs and values into countries that traditionally oppose it (Islam), and then crying when there is a retaliation.

    600,000 white Londoners moved out of London in 10 years. That's pretty significant. I can assure you withe 100% confidence that the vast vast majority of these people moved out for the very reasons I have described in here. English people by nature are reserved, polite and tolerant, so a fuss isn't kicked up.

    I'd genuinely love for you to spend 3 months in an immigrant filled area in London like the ones I mentioned, and then compare that to Singapore. You will notice significant differences in the respect or lack of it from immigrants in this country to the nation they are residing in (unlike Singapore).
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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    Wrong.

    Britain had a wonderful, thriving culture once. However the incompetents who came into power after WW2 decided to throw it in the dumpster. They traded national pride, national identity, safety, happiness and stability for multiculturalism - a ship so poorly built that it sank the minute it got out of port. As an Englishman it's my duty to encourage the reinstallation of British traditions and culture, as it is of every other indigenous Englishman.
    If you say so.
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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    Slim majority :mmm:

    But you are right. Once you're past zone 5 people actually make eye contact with you.
    I live in zone 1, doesn't seem too bad, but I guess I'm just used to it
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    I live in zone 1, doesn't seem too bad, but I guess I'm just used to it
    I lived in zone 1 last year and go to a zone 1 uni. I still think rush hour is possibly the most depressing thing on a social level.

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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    I lived in zone 1 last year and go to a zone 1 uni. I still think rush hour is possibly the most depressing thing on a social level.

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    loool nah Jubilee line's great

    I love seeing dudes in suits and ties getting all huffy cos it's so packed
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    loool nah Jubilee line's great

    I love seeing dudes in suits and ties getting all huffy cos it's so packed
    Mate, you tried getting off the Northern line at Euston at 8:45?

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    We're still in mourning over the loss of the empire, and are suffering from the effects of the castration we endured in the latter half of the 20th century.

    Even the Scots want rid of us now, and that's a hard pill to swallow
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    (Original post by Parx)
    Has anyone realised? I don't know about you but when I've been abroad I have always noticed a vast difference between England and these other countries. These other countries I have been to be it, Australia, Singapore or Indonesia or as west as USA or more centrally with the likes of Spain and Italy - they all have a more identifiable culture and one which everyone buys into. They might not be the richest in the world, they might have economic problems in some countries, but they are happier as people.

    I can't help but feel England is going nowhere and everyone is thoroughly unhappy. I'm actually considering moving out of England because it's such an unhappy life here. I spent 3 weeks in Australia and it was a breathtaking experience. Everybody happy, smiling, stupendously good weather, beautiful beaches, such a chilled and relaxed laid back culture and more than that everyone buying into the Australian way of life. No opposition, no clashes.. just Australian. It was amazing and a really peaceful and happy experience. I left there feeling really sad .. I could not believe how happy I felt as a person and it made me realise just how much I have missed out on in life by not being from a country such as that. I'd take it every day of the week over being raised in England and being an Englishmen.

    Thoughts?
    I think it works on a number of levels. First, I do think there is an English national trait to be somewhat pessimistic, and people feel generally more distrustful of government and of the motives of their fellow citizens. There is a genuine level of dislike between people from different sectors of the country, whether it's the south vs the North, England vs Scotland, London vs everywhere else and particularly in the class system. The middle and upper class look down on the working class, the working class are disdainful of the middle and upper.

    I think this is also partly down to the economic reality of this country. It is a less wealthy country than Australia (on a per capita basis), Australia has a somewhat more equal economy. Your average Australian worker will live out in the suburbs in a detached house with a garage, two cars. And there's a lot more stuff you can do for free to entertain yourself in Australia; you can drive out to one of the beautiful beaches, or play sport, etc. The culture and politics in Australia is I think more centred around the wishes of the average person, whereas in the UK there is undoubtedly an upper-middle and upper class stranglehold on setting the priorities of government (excepting for periods under the Attlee and Wilson governments). I also think in Australia there is a general sense of optimism, that things are getting better; the country is continuing to become wealthier and there is a sense of opportunity about being one of only two Western first-world countries in the Asian region. There's a belief Australia is set up to exploit the Asian boom and be part of it, rather than the faint sense of permanent decline I sometimes sense in Europe

    In Australia even if you're an average worker-type person, you can have a pretty good life whereas if you're a working-class person in England, the weather is not great and you have to live in smaller houses often terraces. The environment around you is less pleasing to the eye for the majority of people. You don't get a lot of direct sunlight, etc etc

    On the other hand, I'm from Australia and I chose to come and make my life here in England, permanently. And I love it here, I couldn't imagine living in any other city than London. It has the most amazing history, the architecture and historical sites are brilliant. It also has a much more lively scene and it's more of a world city than any in Australia (London really is, alongside New York, basically the world capitals). There's so much more in the way of live music, politics, academia, social movements, the most incredible art collections in museums, interesting vestigial establishments like the Inns of Court and the clubs of Pall Mall. You can meet more interesting and more diverse people in London than you could in Sydney, which is more akin to a city like Chicago.

    So there are upsides and downsides. The weather is definitely a downside in England, as is the lack of land. On the other hand, there are great opportunities in this city for someone who is sharp and ambitious. But the majority of people in this country don't live in cities like London, so I can see how Australia would be much more attractive to most Brits
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    I think there's a "national mood" that goes up and down over time.

    There was a definite period of optimism in the UK in the 1990s, which replaced a time of general social upheaval and strife in the 1980s.

    I would have put the peak era of optimism from about mid 1990s to the Millennium.

    In the mid 1990s there was definitely a cool, upbeat feeling about the UK and British culture, music was one part of it there were so many good bands around and bands from different parts of the country as well which kind of gave different cities an identity. England hosted a major football tournament in Euro '96, which was also a beautiful summer, and with England playing well and getting to the semis I remember the vibe was incredible, everybody felt united following that tournament. It went beyond just football fans. There was a similar vibe during the France 98 World Cup but I felt subsequent national tournaments always had a bit of cynicism around them with non-football fans being disinterested and football fans just complaining all the time.

    Tony Blair definitely rode the "Cool Britannia" bandwagon and whilst the economy generally was improving quite a lot even before he came to office, there was no doubt that the change in mood and fresher, younger feel of the country made things very difficult for John Major as the Conservatives had been in office a long time and although Major himself was quite well regarded, there was just a total vibe for change hence Blair winning a landslide of historic scale.

    Princess Diana as well kind of fit "Cool Britannia", behind her vulnerable image she was very good at her own PR and was quite modern and 'cool' which made her the most interesting person by far in a dry institution like the monarchy, which is why during that period leading up to her death she was the most famous person in the world.

    Also as the economy was going well, this was a good time to be young, as a young person you had reason to be optimistic about the future. Higher education was expanding (although fees had just started to come in) and generally if you got a 2:1 from a decent university you would have your pick of a few graduate jobs, could get a decent salary and then after 3 to 4 years expect a promotion, substantial salary increase and given the state of mortgage lending, find it quite easy to get a mortgage for property which in those days promised to be a very lucrative investment.

    This was also the era when budget airlines and generally low cost travel was expanding which also made it an exciting time to be young, the Alex Garland book "The Beach" was written about this time and basically captured the new vibe for going to south east asia and looking for cheap holidays in paradise. The "gap year" became a rite of passage during these days.

    All in all, back then there was a lot of optimism and it just generally felt like a more innocent, less serious, more fun time and people were more open to others. There was not all this hate towards immigrants or Muslims back then, or demonisation of people on the dole etc. We were less insular and just more relaxed and confident as a nation.

    Two significant events changed this: first was September 11th which created a lot of new worries about security and led us down a path of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. It took its toll on Blair who could do no wrong in his first four years but soon started to look old and troubled and became unpopular.

    Second event was the financial crisis and subsequent recession and austerity. This completely changed things especially for the young. The mood of optimism went and was replaced by a lot of anxiety which the Milennials now feel.
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    (Original post by BeastOfSyracuse)
    I think it works on a number of levels. First, I do think there is an English national trait to be somewhat pessimistic, and people feel generally more distrustful of government and of the motives of their fellow citizens. There is a genuine level of dislike between people from different sectors of the country, whether it's the south vs the North, England vs Scotland, London vs everywhere else and particularly in the class system. The middle and upper class look down on the working class, the working class are disdainful of the middle and upper.

    I think this is also partly down to the economic reality of this country. It is a less wealthy country than Australia (on a per capita basis), Australia has a somewhat more equal economy. Your average Australian worker will live out in the suburbs in a detached house with a garage, two cars. And there's a lot more stuff you can do for free to entertain yourself in Australia; you can drive out to one of the beautiful beaches, or play sport, etc. The culture and politics in Australia is I think more centred around the wishes of the average person, whereas in the UK there is undoubtedly an upper-middle and upper class stranglehold on setting the priorities of government (excepting for periods under the Attlee and Wilson governments). I also think in Australia there is a general sense of optimism, that things are getting better; the country is continuing to become wealthier and there is a sense of opportunity about being one of only two Western first-world countries in the Asian region. There's a belief Australia is set up to exploit the Asian boom and be part of it, rather than the faint sense of permanent decline I sometimes sense in Europe

    In Australia even if you're an average worker-type person, you can have a pretty good life whereas if you're a working-class person in England, the weather is not great and you have to live in smaller houses often terraces. The environment around you is less pleasing to the eye for the majority of people. You don't get a lot of direct sunlight, etc etc

    On the other hand, I'm from Australia and I chose to come and make my life here in England, permanently. And I love it here, I couldn't imagine living in any other city than London. It has the most amazing history, the architecture and historical sites are brilliant. It also has a much more lively scene and it's more of a world city than any in Australia (London really is, alongside New York, basically the world capitals). There's so much more in the way of live music, politics, academia, social movements, the most incredible art collections in museums, interesting vestigial establishments like the Inns of Court and the clubs of Pall Mall. You can meet more interesting and more diverse people in London than you could in Sydney, which is more akin to a city like Chicago.

    So there are upsides and downsides. The weather is definitely a downside in England, as is the lack of land. On the other hand, there are great opportunities in this city for someone who is sharp and ambitious. But the majority of people in this country don't live in cities like London, so I can see how Australia would be much more attractive to most Brits
    I can't disagree with anything you've said there, not even the compliments you have given London. At least you are not a) one of these people raised only in London, and not having the experience to comment or b) one of these liberal Englishmen living in the countryside who again don't have the knowledge or experience to comment.

    But the thing is that you've painted a one sided picture of London in terms of what it offers the average person here if they seek it. That's not exactly what I would call a balanced or rational argument about London. I'd still wager that you would NOT want to live in a Muslim dominated environment or an environment dominated by immigrants (like some of the places I have mentioned), where you are unable to meet likeminded Western folk.
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    (Original post by Parx)
    Has anyone realised? I don't know about you but when I've been abroad I have always noticed a vast difference between England and these other countries. These other countries I have been to be it, Australia, Singapore or Indonesia or as west as USA or more centrally with the likes of Spain and Italy - they all have a more identifiable culture and one which everyone buys into. They might not be the richest in the world, they might have economic problems in some countries, but they are happier as people. I don't know if there's a correlation between great weather and a slower pace of life like in a number of those countries I mentioned, and a happier existence. Everyone buys into the country, the culture and way of life. There's a stronger sense of purpose, unity and spirit.

    I can't help but feel personally very unhappy in England as an Englishmen. I also can't help but feel that this country and the people here are very unhappy. My personal opinions about this range from mass immigration, to the growing ascent of Islam to things about this country such as the weather, the 24/7 way of working life in these modern times, greater pressures and economic issues from housing to health, to the rise in technology and consumerism and materialism in this economically developed country with everything on its doorstep. I just think the traditions and heritage of this country is being eroded and lots of people are unhappy, Brits and non-Brits. Lots of Brits are worried about the state of this country and where it's going. I look at immigrants who come here from Eastern Europe and working in cafes or as cleaners and wondering how they can wake up every day and be happy ... they aren't. I look at Muslims and think they can't be happy either, they don't look it. They obviously don't feel comfortable with their status in the UK on a wider level, however it's not our duty to accept them for who they are and if anything it should be the other way around. But this is a growing problem in England today, the dissipating British way of life while the mass influx of new cultures and people come to the UK without assimilating into British culture.

    Then there's the economic side of this country. We are kind of too spoiled. We are one of the greatest most developed countries on this planet and are very lucky to have the opportunity to have what we have, comparatively to the world. Maybe we have too much too easy and don't make the effort? We just take things for granted. Our country is colder not just literally, but as people. We don't value family like they do in other countries and culture. Heck even America is better than here, I lived there for a year. Everyone flies the American flag there, everyone considers themself American and buys into the country. It's a different feeling alltogether.

    I can't help but feel England is going nowhere and everyone is thoroughly unhappy. I'm actually considering moving out of England because it's such an unhappy life here. I spent 3 weeks in Australia and it was a breathtaking experience. Everybody happy, smiling, stupendously good weather, beautiful beaches, such a chilled and relaxed laid back culture and more than that everyone buying into the Australian way of life. No opposition, no clashes.. just Australian. It was amazing and a really peaceful and happy experience. I left there feeling really sad .. I could not believe how happy I felt as a person and it made me realise just how much I have missed out on in life by not being from a country such as that. I'd take it every day of the week over being raised in England and being an Englishmen.

    Thoughts?

    We're in the middle of a muslamic take over.
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    (Original post by Parx)
    Has anyone realised? I don't know about you but when I've been abroad I have always noticed a vast difference between England and these other countries.
    Of course you have. People rarely go on holiday without rose-tinted glasses.

    These other countries I have been to be it, Australia, Singapore or Indonesia or as west as USA or more centrally with the likes of Spain and Italy - they all have a more identifiable culture and one which everyone buys into.
    Given that being miserable makes up a considerable part of our culture, from dealing with other people to self-deprecating comedy, I'm not only not surprised at that but also wondering why you're complaining that the English are too... English.

    I look at immigrants who come here from Eastern Europe and working in cafes or as cleaners and wondering how they can wake up every day and be happy ... they aren't.
    Of course they're not. They were under the assumption that the grass was going to be greener... but it ain't. From my, admittedly somewhat limited, experience of dealing Eastern European immigrants who have come here to work, they only moved here so that they could send money back to their families to enable a better life for them and themselves when they move back over there. Our money is worth more due to their economies being comparatively piss-poor; they're still working just as hard as they would be within their home country, all that's changed is the scenery. What's to be happy about?

    I look at Muslims and think they can't be happy either, they don't look it. They obviously don't feel comfortable with their status in the UK on a wider level, however it's not our duty to accept them for who they are and if anything it should be the other way around. But this is a growing problem in England today, the dissipating British way of life while the mass influx of new cultures and people come to the UK without assimilating into British culture.
    Ahh yes, multiculturalism. The ill-thought out notion that cramming loads of different cultures together within a relatively small space will result in harmony instead of segregation.

    Then there's the economic side of this country. We are kind of too spoiled. We are one of the greatest most developed countries on this planet and are very lucky to have the opportunity to have what we have, comparatively to the world. Maybe we have too much too easy and don't make the effort?
    Ok, Imma stop you right there. I work ****ing hard for my money. Physically hard. My job entails getting dirty, sweaty, and burnt out on a daily basis. My health will be amusing to the doctors by the time I'm 50, I'm sure.
    So don't you dare turn around and imply that I'm "spoiled" based on sheer luck that I was born in the "right country", and as for "not making the effort"? Come spend a week doing my job, you'll learn what effort is. I might not be working in the Pakistani brick yards, but knowing that doesn't make my job any easier on my back.

    We may have more opportunities in general compared to other countries, but not everyone is allowed those opportunities. You'd do well to remember that before going off on one about how we "take things for granted" (I'm not talking about myself here, this is merely an observation).

    Heck even America is better than here, I lived there for a year. Everyone flies the American flag there, everyone considers themself American and buys into the country. It's a different feeling alltogether.
    Being blinded by patriotic brainwashing from an early age will do that to you.

    (On Australia) No opposition, no clashes.. just Australian. It was amazing and a really peaceful and happy experience. I left there feeling really sad .. I could not believe how happy I felt as a person and it made me realise just how much I have missed out on in life by not being from a country such as that. I'd take it every day of the week over being raised in England and being an Englishmen.
    I know people who are actively involved in attempting to take down far-right extremists in Australia. They've gotten death threats as a result. No opposition? Yeah right, you're having a giggle.

    Thoughts?
    If you want to leave, I ain't gonna stop you.

    Signed,
    Everyone x
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    It's unhappy because money comes from our pockets to pay taxes that then go on to feeding chav vermin that then go on to turn the country to sh*t.

    The weather is also a pretty obvious one.

    If there is anything that's happy about it is the humour.
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    Ah good old immigration - I suppose we are all racist eh?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti....html#comments
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    (Original post by coolkid17)
    As of the 2011 census, the majority of the population in London is still UK-born. You say you're not a racist. In line with that, you shouldn't be having a problem.



    Yet you speak of being a minority in London. The UK-born population is made up of whites, blacks, and many other races and ethnicities. If you're not a racist and merely disagree with the fact that immigration is eroding your British culture, then you should be able to share cultural similarities with all of these people who were born and brought up in the UK- who make up a majority in London.
    The idea that 'UK born culture' is the same thing as English culture is an obvious nonsense tbh, and the kind of PC statement that cries out for correction and irritates everyone who doesn't have blue hair or use words like 'cisnormative'.

    Almost nobody cares at all about someone's colour these days. When people make complaints like this, they are talking about culture, language and the like.

    Not all immigrant groups or individual immigrants are the same. Some integrate, some keep entirely within their own communities and cultures, some exist in the middle.

    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    I love seeing dudes in suits and ties getting all huffy cos it's so packed
    Nothing worse than this tbh.

    I have been known to get up an hour early to miss it in the mornings, and burn a couple of hours in a pret or a pub to miss it in the evenings.
 
 
 
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