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A 'fact' from your subject Watch

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    (Original post by urbanlocations)
    Experts can still retrieve data. In fact Top Gear did a show a few years ago in which they water damaged, hit the hard drive, set it on fire. Basically anything to destroy it... If I remember correctly an expert could still retrieve 90 percent of the data.
    They can't retrieve data that's been rewritten.

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    (Original post by urbanlocations)
    Experts can still retrieve data. In fact Top Gear did a show a few years ago in which they water damaged, hit the hard drive, set it on fire. Basically anything to destroy it... If I remember correctly an expert could still retrieve 90 percent of the data.
    Damaging a hard drive isn't the same as destroying it. Damaging a few hard drives isn't enough to conclude that it's physically impossible to remove the data on a hard drive. For example if you melt down a hard drive how would the data be stored and how could an expert retrieve it?

    Short of destroying the drive, you can use a program to flip each bit to a 0 or a 1 or a (pseudo)random bit. If you do this where is the old data still stored to be recovered? Similarly if you overwrite the contents of the drive, where is the old data stored?
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    CPU = Central Processing Unit
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    When John Steinbeck wrote Of Mice and Men, a politician wrote to him and told him how terrible it was of him to write such a book, and that the way he'd described the 1930s was wrong and exaggerated, so he invited her to look around ranches. She accepted, and immediately after she apologised, never having been aware of how awful the Depression was. Steinbeck had seen awful things - such as a ranch worker who attacked another ranch worker with a rake and it split him in half. Also, it's original title was "A thing that happened". And it was meant to be a play.
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    Approximately 71% of the earth is covered in water.

    Around 2.5% of it is drinkable fresh water.

    1% of that is currently not accessible.

    Get ready for water wars.
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    (Original post by ServantOfMorgoth)
    They can't retrieve data that's been rewritten.

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    http://www.nber.org/sys-admin/overwr...a-gutmann.html Please read.

    Yes they can. MANY people can. Btw what background do you have on this kind of stuff?
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    Damaging a hard drive isn't the same as destroying it. Damaging a few hard drives isn't enough to conclude that it's physically impossible to remove the data on a hard drive. For example if you melt down a hard drive how would the data be stored and how could an expert retrieve it?

    Short of destroying the drive, you can use a program to flip each bit to a 0 or a 1 or a (pseudo)random bit. If you do this where is the old data still stored to be recovered? Similarly if you overwrite the contents of the drive, where is the old data stored?

    http://www.nber.org/sys-admin/overwr...a-gutmann.html
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    (Original post by urbanlocations)
    http://www.nber.org/sys-admin/overwr...a-gutmann.html Please read.

    Yes they can. MANY people can. Btw what background do you have on this kind of stuff?
    :lolwut: that link disproves what you've been saying

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    That's very interesting. I didn't know that. So overwriting with non random data is out of the question, assuming that the technology is accurate, efficient and fast enough to use. Still, if you've overwritten with random data then it'll be impossible to retrieve the original data.

    You didn't answer my other question. How can you recover data from a hard drive that's been completely destroyed?
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    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    Here's one for you to use next time:

    How much does energy cost?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    80p
    This is probably the best joke I've ever heard. I will write this in all of my Biology exams!
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    (Original post by JustJusty)
    Maths - Everywhere in the world apart from the UK, an imaginary number denoted with the letter i. In the UK, we use the letter j, which doesn't really make sense.
    That's not true - in the UK we also use i.
    I've read that engineers use j, which does makes sense because i / I is already used to denote current.
 
 
 
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