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What does Brexit means for young people? Your questions answered watch

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    (Original post by Boreism)
    David Cameron has already ruled out (basically scrapped) a 2nd referendum.
    He won't be in charge soon.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    He won't be in charge soon.
    But he's still in power though.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    But he's still in power though.
    Dead man walking. A 2nd Referendum isn't likely in the near future. But it or a GE on a Remain agenda certainly is possible in due course.

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    The more important question regarding EU students is not whether they'll get the funding, but whether they have to pay the 20,000 pounds+ after the UK leaves. Anyone know for students starting this autumn?
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    (Original post by Bath~Student)
    The more important question regarding EU students is not whether they'll get the funding, but whether they have to pay the 20,000 pounds+ after the UK leaves. Anyone know for students starting this autumn?
    It's unchanged for EU students starting their course this year.

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    (Original post by elnino1.0)
    Well, I don't think Brexit will change anything in terms of studying at Uni in Germany, but A Levels aren't sufficient in Germany already now. That is because the German Abitur requires you to do humanities, sciences, languages, maths and German, which is impossible to cover with four A Levels... So to study in Germany you have to take more A Levels than what is usual, otherwise it'll only be recognized as "Fachabitur" in Germany which doesn't really allow you to study any subject at uni...
    Currently due to the EU it is possible to study with three A Levels and one As Levels, which is then like the so called "Fachgebunde Hochschulreife" and allows you to study a subject at a university (not only the Fachhochschulen), but only a subject, you meet the subject requirements for. So you can still end up at a German university wit the normal amount of A Levels.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    It's unchanged for EU students starting their course this year.

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    Thanks, but in 2 years EU students will be classified as "international students", meaning it should be increased?
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    (Original post by Bath~Student)
    Thanks, but in 2 years EU students will be classified as "international students", meaning it should be increased?
    No.

    We don't know what will happen as a result of the Article 50 negotiations. It's possible EU students will still receive some concessions in 2 years time. We don't know...

    AND if you start a course THIS academic year then your status will not change. You will continue to be charged on the same fee basis as at present.

    Bottomline, your fees will not increase to the International level.
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    (Original post by Bath~Student)
    Thanks, but in 2 years EU students will be classified as "international students", meaning it should be increased?
    Students starting their course in 2016 have been promised that support and funding will stay with them for the duration of their courses. https://twitter.com/JoJohnsonMP/stat...72095772950528

    Arrangements for students starting in 2017 and later will be part of the negotiations happening over the next 2 years. There's no automatic assumption that all EU students will be classed as international in 2 years time. Article 50 hasn't yet been invoked, there's talk of a general election before that happens and most of the leave campaigners appear to have backtracked and are now talking about staying in the single market with free movement of people (which would mean no change to student support and fee arrangements for EU students).
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    (Original post by Bath~Student)
    The more important question regarding EU students is not whether they'll get the funding, but whether they have to pay the 20,000 pounds+ after the UK leaves. Anyone know for students starting this autumn?
    My university sent me an email telling me this :
    "We wanted to let you know the latest news we have following the EU Referendum result. This is a complex situation and the nature of the change in the UK’s relationship with the EU will take some time to emerge. We wanted to reassure you that as a prospective student from the EU:your immigration status has not changed as a result of the voteyour tuition fee status also remains unchanged and you will be charged tuition fees at the same rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if during that time the UK formally leaves the EUyou will continue to have access to UK government loans to meet the cost of your tuition fees throughout your courseeligible EU students will also have access to the new Postgraduate Masters Loans scheme which opened for applications this week"
    You wan also find something stating the same thing on the student finance website
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    One thing worth considering is whether EU graduates can stay in the UK after graduation and apply for jobs in the UK or would they have to leave immediately after they finish their course as is the case with international (non EU) graduates.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    One thing worth considering is whether EU graduates can stay in the UK after graduation and apply for jobs in the UK or would they have to leave immediately after they finish their course as is the case with international (non EU) graduates.
    Except we don't know...

    And the same question will apply to UK students graduating in the EU.

    BTW, EU students studying in the UK are only approx 5% of total undergrad students. Probably a reflection of the relatively high cost (no maintenance loan, etc)

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    Can I still study at a Dutch uni in 2017?
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Can I still study at a Dutch uni in 2017?
    You can always study anywhere.

    But if you mean will you still get it at the (very low) EU student rate: probably - it will depend on how fast the Brexit negotiations proceed and what is agreed.
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    A friend wanted to know if getting visas as an international student will be harder or not. I heard that they're rejecting student visas so just curious.
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    (Original post by u97)
    A friend wanted to know if getting visas as an international student will be harder or not. I heard that they're rejecting student visas so just curious.
    There's no official changes to policy.

    It's possible that it might be tightened up for 2017 entry onwards depending on the new prime minister (the favourite candidate at the moment is the women currently responsible for immigration who has restricted entry significantly over the last five years).
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    I'm not a British citizen nor an EU national, so I guess Brexit doesn't really affect me a lot. But it will surely affect my friends form Europe.

    Still, as an outsider, Brexit and all the stuff going on in the UK regarding Brexit is quite fascinating to watch.
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    In my opinion, regardless of whoever becomes the next PM, getting a tier 4 student visa (for Uni) as a non-EU national wouldn't be that much different. Economically, international students from outside the EU contribute a lot to British universities ('cause they pay way higher tuition fee. For my case, domestic& EU tuition fee is somewhere around £9000 while for non-EU students, it's like £16000) and the economy. However, it will become much harder for a language school student or those who are planning to attend not-so-well-known unis or colleges to get tier 4 student visa (bogus language schools/colleges/unis here refer to those institutions where they "sell" visa for foreign students who want to work in the UK. These institutions rarely have proper buildings or campuses and they never really have proper class)


    (Original post by PQ)
    There's no official changes to policy.

    It's possible that it might be tightened up for 2017 entry onwards depending on the new prime minister (the favourite candidate at the moment is the women currently responsible for immigration who has restricted entry significantly over the last five years).
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Can I still study at a Dutch uni in 2017?
    http://www.universityworldnews.com/a...60705191447118
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    Thanks for the link but I'm not actually looking at that uni
 
 
 
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