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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Hey! See you in lectures Which modules are you looking to take?
    Physics
    Materials.
    Chemistry/Computer Science.
    I can't decide which one. :O

    I also wanna try my hand at Maths B, since I can already do a lot of the online Maths A past papers.
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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Hey! See you in lectures Which modules are you looking to take?
    What modules are you looking at taking? I'm thinking Chemistry, Physics, Maths B and materials or earth sciences (not too sure about this one)
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    For the Phys NatScis on this thread regarding modules.
    Spoiler:
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    Materials Science:

    An incredibly interesting subject that combines a good bit of Chemistry with Physics. If you like inorganic Chemistry, Metallurgy, Crystallography and learning about the Mechanical properties of materials then this course will suit you well. It also puts you in good stead for Phys A and Chemistry in part IB.

    The modules within MatSci are:

    A - Atomic Structure of Materials - Basic introduction to Crystallography and a lot of the terminology used within the whole course is introduced here. Course A is the foundation for the whole of IA.
    B - Materials for Devices - Here you learn about certain materials that have specific uses. You touch on the world of piezo/pyo and ferroelectric materials as well as Ferromagnetic materials and their uses. Small section on polymers and a couple lectures on solid ionic conductors and their uses.
    C - Diffraction - Here you get introduced to X-ray diffraction as applied to materials science, a little bit of maths is used here. Essentially the whole course is X-ray diffraction
    D - Microstructure - A huge course that takes 4-5 weeks and is one of the more interesting courses. You learn how to characterise materials on the micro scale, learn how changing the microstructure can lead to huge changes in the mechanical properties of the bulk. Thermodynamics is introduced here with the concept of gibbs free energy. The concept of a phase within a material, the concept of kinetics and how to kinetically control materials to force a phase/s. Diffusional processes are explained and the concept of a surface energy is introduced.
    E- Mechanical Behavior of Materials - Easily my favourite module, this is more engineering oriented, but it is incredibly interesting. You look at how metals actually deform under a load, there's too much to mention here that it would be hard not to spoil it. You may think elastic/plastic deformation was simple, it turns out you need a whole lecture course to explain just the very surface of the concept.
    F- Biomaterials - Not a very interesting course personally, you look at microstructures of biological material such as bone, wood, spider silk. The concept of a merit index is introduced and you learn how to optimise a material for a given application. The concept of glasses are introduced.
    G - Materials under Extreme Conditions - Here you look at how materials change under extreme conditions, that means either extremely high or low pressures/temperatures or strains. A little more thermodynamics is added. The concept of creep is introduced (how materials deform with stresses below yield).

    1 Practical per week, overall worth 5% of your IA MatSci grade, graded by signing in and an online quiz. Work is set via 1 problem sheet a week. Lecutres are in the Babbage Lecture Theatre, practicals are in the Materials Department in West site.

    Earth Sciences:

    I really don't have much to say about this as I didn't take it. There is a significant overlap with the chemistry involved in Earth Sciences and with Materials Science, particularly within courses D and G. Work is set via problem sheets and essays. There are significantly more practicals with Earth Sci (I think there are 1 hour practicals every couple days - don't quote me on that). From what I hear, people who do take Earth, enjoy it a lot. (Also you get to lick rocks). A good course to take if you are planning anything geophysical. Lectures on New Museum site in the Physiology lecture theatre, practicals also there within the Earth Science department.

    The general consensus is for people to sway over to Materials Science as it seems like the default option, MatSci last year was oversubscribed and quite a few people did not like the course. I didn't like the way the course was taught, but I loved the course material.

    CompSci :

    A good number of NatScis who do take this module do regret it, it has quite a high workload from what I have gathered and even my DoS advises against taking this unless you are completely committed.
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    Also for the Maths A vs B fence sitters:
    Spoiler:
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    If you're confident, I strongly suggest taking B. It makes you a better mathematician (as applied to the Physical Sciences - to avoid triggering mathmos lmao), your lecturers respect you more in terms of mathematical maturity and the lectures are more fluid and coherent. Lots of 'aside' topics that make the lectures more interesting; non-examinable content etc.
    It is order of magnitude easier to drop from B to A than it is to step up to B from A the further you go on down the year. The standard A content is taught in a different style and in a different order and faster.

    I did not take Further Maths, I self taught it all during the summer and took B, if you're ok with the speed then go ahead and take B. There is no penalty for taking A over B, the examination is the same and the only difference is that there are 2 starred questions in the exam that only B students can access. This year there was a PDE question that took me 5 minutes to answer. B gives you more options in terms of questions to answer and so it can actually benefit you in the exam.

    Essentially, I recommend starting out with B for the first couple weeks or even the first term and then judge whether or not you like it. Dropping down to A after the first term is quite common.
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    (Original post by WhisperingTide)
    Physics
    Materials.
    Chemistry/Computer Science.
    I can't decide which one. :O

    I also wanna try my hand at Maths B, since I can already do a lot of the online Maths A past papers.
    I heard you get grade against actual compsci people...

    (Original post by Joshthemathmo)
    What modules are you looking at taking? I'm thinking Chemistry, Physics, Maths B and materials or earth sciences (not too sure about this one)
    Same as you... Probably materials but considering bio of cells too. Haven't considered deeply yet though
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    (Original post by Protoxylic)
    Also for the Maths A vs B fence sitters:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    If you're confident, I strongly suggest taking B. It makes you a better mathematician (as applied to the Physical Sciences - to avoid triggering mathmos lmao), your lecturers respect you more in terms of mathematical maturity and the lectures are more fluid and coherent. Lots of 'aside' topics that make the lectures more interesting; non-examinable content etc.
    It is order of magnitude easier to drop from B to A than it is to step up to B from A the further you go on down the year. The standard A content is taught in a different style and in a different order and faster.

    I did not take Further Maths, I self taught it all during the summer and took B, if you're ok with the speed then go ahead and take B. There is no penalty for taking A over B, the examination is the same and the only difference is that there are 2 starred questions in the exam that only B students can access. This year there was a PDE question that took me 5 minutes to answer. B gives you more options in terms of questions to answer and so it can actually benefit you in the exam.

    Essentially, I recommend starting out with B for the first couple weeks or even the first term and then judge whether or not you like it. Dropping down to A after the first term is quite common.
    A CompSci I met on an open day suggested self-teaching FP3 for people who want to do Maths B. Do you think that would be useful, or are the pre-term maths courses that some (all?) colleges do new things with the aim of getting everyone up to speed? (Not really asking for myself, as I'm doing CompSci w. Maths, barring any sudden changes of heart).
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    A CompSci I met on an open day suggested self-teaching FP3 for people who want to do Maths B. Do you think that would be useful, or are the pre-term maths courses that some (all?) colleges do new things with the aim of getting everyone up to speed? (Not really asking for myself, as I'm doing CompSci w. Maths, barring any sudden changes of heart).
    Hmm, if you didn't take FP3 it may be a good idea to get that in your head before you arrive yeah.

    I didn't attend any pre-term maths courses so I wouldn't know what would be taught in those classes.

    Within Maths B, the lecturers do respect that all the people have come across most of the material they teach so sometimes students email in asking to go faster. A-Level concepts aren't necessarily taught, they're just respected, introduced, assumed to be known and move on (first term is kind of slow). So it may be useful for your friend to at least look up and get familiar with the material in FP3, although not necessary.
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    Anyone else here going to girton?
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    I can't believe I got in!! Is anyone else going to St catharines or doing Law??
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    (Original post by Duke Glacia)
    What's the cheapest way to buy paper pens etc ?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I buy pens, pencils, notebooks, large lever arch files etc from supermarkets (Tesco, Sainsburys etc) and maybe when you arrive in Cambridge they'll still have the school/uni events on with the sales.

    Refill pads I've bought from Rymans: 300 pages of decent quality paper for 99p rn (again, I hope it's still on that price when you arrive)

    Everything else, plastic wallets, plastic popper folders and some medium sized storage cases for various things I got from a shop called The Works (there's one in Cambridge, The Grafton centre, thankfully!) and they're very cheap and durable!

    I'd say everything altogether has cost me about £50. Aside from some basic black pens, I'm sorted on the stationery front now!
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    I buy pens, pencils, notebooks, large lever arch files etc from supermarkets (Tesco, Sainsburys etc) and maybe when you arrive in Cambridge they'll still have the school/uni events on with the sales.

    Refill pads I've bought from Rymans: 300 pages of decent quality paper for 99p rn (again, I hope it's still on that price when you arrive)

    Everything else, plastic wallets, plastic popper folders and some medium sized storage cases for various things I got from a shop called The Works (there's one in Cambridge, The Grafton centre, thankfully!) and they're very cheap and durable!

    I'd say everything altogether has cost me about £50. Aside from some basic black pens, I'm sorted on the stationery front now!
    The Grafton Centre seems to be a good place to go when you want cheap stuff, not just stationery but clothing, etc. And if you're desparate for junk foods, the area around Grafton is the place to go. .
    Pity it's a bit away from the area where the university's facilities are.....and is very close to Anglia Ruskin .....

    Edit: and if you're in need of a good, reliable alteration tailor (before May Balls?), there's a very good one very close to Grafton.
    My daughter bought a cheap evening dress from TK Maxx online for May Balls which was a bit too long for her and had altered beautifully by them.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    The Grafton Centre seems to be a good place to go when you want cheap stuff, not just stationery but clothing, etc. And if you're disparate for junk foods, the area around Grafton is the place to go. .
    Pity it's a bit away from the area where the university's facilities are.....and is very close to Anglia Ruskin .....
    Yeah, I was looking through the list of shops at the grafton centre and found many of the ones I'm used to lol. Then I looked at shops in the grand arcade and found so many I had never even heard of before :indiff:
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    Anybody know what the plan for Medicine lectures is this year? I read somewhere that the ones held at Lady Mitchell Hall (Sidgwick) were being moved to New Museums/Downing Site, but not sure if this is true. It might influence whether or not I need a bike (since should be at Magdalene).


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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    Yeah, I was looking through the list of shops at the grafton centre and found many of the ones I'm used to lol. Then I looked at shops in the grand arcade and found so many I had never even heard of before :indiff:
    Grand Archade is a posh(-ish) shopping mall. But if you want a nice and reasonably priced trainers, they have Sports Direct there.
    And TK Maxx in Cambridge is quite good and they're in the town centre.

    If you manage to get a few people to share a cab (or ask your uncle!!), there's a couple of retail parks outside the town centre with good discount shops, too.
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    Does anybody know how accomodation a King's work? They said that they have a 35 week lease (instead of the 29 week) (quote) "35 week lease (running from October to June minus 2-3 weeks over Christmas)." - does that mean I'll be booted out over Christmas??? Do internationals get special priority for getting these 35 week leases in all three years?
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    Are there any specific rules regarding students having visitors during the year? For instance if a family member or a friend came over would they be able to sleep in the students room or would they have to pay for a hotel in the town?
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    (Original post by KingRS)
    Are there any specific rules regarding students having visitors during the year? For instance if a family member or a friend came over would they be able to sleep in the students room or would they have to pay for a hotel in the town?
    The formal rule says you have to report to the college if someone who is not a member of the college (even a member of other Cambridge college) is planning to stay in your room, but in reality nobody does.
    But if your guest is obviously not a student (like your parents) eating breakfast/dinner in a dining hall, they might be questioned.

    All colleges have guest rooms for non-members to stay, if they'd rather not stay in a hotel. Guest rooms are much nicer than student's rooms and usually cheaper than most of town centre hotels. You can book a room for them as a member of the college.

    We've never done it ourselves when our daughter was at college as we live within one hour drive from the university, but my brother/sister in law did several times when their daughter was there, and they said it was quite nice to be able to stay in the college, rather than a hotel. ( though he was a Cambridge student himself donkey's ears ago)
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    (Original post by WhisperingTide)
    Sweet! Any idea what modules you're taking? I wanna take them all! :O
    Same!!
    Aha I'm definitely taking Physics, Materials and Maths and I think I might want to do a biological option like Physiology as my fourth one I wasn't going to but then A level results happened XD
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    Protoxylic your posts have actually been so helpful thank you so so much!
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    How convenient that my birthday is just a week before I go there - I can ask my friends and family to buy me useful uni stuff as birthday presents! :lol:
 
 
 
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