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    (Original post by Relish)
    Can anyone by any chance give me a good detailed definition of deviation from social norms, failure to function adequately and deviation from ideal mental health, for me to memorise, and if you have time the ao2 points for them too please. Its kind of hard sourcing all the info together from websites and i dont know if they're entirely right.
    Okay, I'll try :s

    Deviation from social norms
    This is when an individual's behaviour breaks either implicit or explicit rules established within society. Implicit rules refer to unwritten rules of conduct that society has laid down, such as not sitting next to someone on the bus when there are plenty of seats available. Explicit rules are those of the law like murder or fraud and breaking the law is considered criminal. When either of these are broken, an individual is considered abnormal under this definition.

    Deviation from ideal mental health
    This is an alternative to the other definitions, and looks at what is considered to be ideal mental health and if an individual deviates from this, they are considered to be abnormal. Jahoda's set of criteria of what ideal mental health is includes features such as personal autonomy, environmental mastery and self actualisation of one's potential. For example, personal autonomy refers to the individual being self-sufficient and independent, and not relying on others during hard times.

    Failure to function adequately
    When an individual is unable to cope with everyday activities and life's daily demands, they are considered to be abnormal. This includes an inability to hold a job, unhealthy social relationships as well as no progression through careers.


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    (Original post by nicole_wilson)
    Deviation from Social Norms - social norms are explicit yet unwritten codes of conduct that define what is acceptable and unacceptable in our society e.g. how long you can shake someone's hand for. Any deviation from this would be considered abnormal, however there are some limitations, such as Abnormal vs Eccentric, Abnormal vs Criminal, and some cultural variations and context-dependent cases

    Failure to function adequately - behaviors that interrupt our basic daily functioning and inhibit our ability to cope are considered abnormal e.g. OCD or anorexia sufferers may be considered not to function adequately because of this. The only main limitation I have for this is exceptions to the rule e.g. students who are stressed under examinations may not function adequately e.g. insomnia/anxiety, however does this make them abnormal? One way of assessing this is using the DSM or Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAF) which uses a scale of 0-100 e.g. 100 = superior mental health, 60 = slight deficiency in coping with some depressive symptoms, 10 = severe risk of harming self or others

    Deviation from ideal mental health - Jahoda created a list of 6 criteria that focus on the ideal mental health standards than the abnormality itself, they are;
    - Self-actualization, the realisation of one's potential
    - accurate perception of reality
    - resistance to stress
    - adapting to and mastering the environment
    - autonomy/independence
    - self-attitudes e.g. high self-esteem

    in terms of limitations, some people actually thrive under stress, and does this mean they're abnormal? Self-actualisation is actually hardly ever achieved, so does this qualify everyone as being abnormal?

    it's long, but I hoped it help
    Wow thanks a lot
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    (Original post by Annettee)
    Okay, I'll try :s

    Deviation from social norms
    This is when an individual's behaviour breaks either implicit or explicit rules established within society. Implicit rules refer to unwritten rules of conduct that society has laid down, such as not sitting next to someone on the bus when there are plenty of seats available. Explicit rules are those of the law like murder or fraud and breaking the law is considered criminal. When either of these are broken, an individual is considered abnormal under this definition.

    Deviation from ideal mental health
    This is an alternative to the other definitions, and looks at what is considered to be ideal mental health and if an individual deviates from this, they are considered to be abnormal. Jahoda's set of criteria of what ideal mental health is includes features such as personal autonomy, environmental mastery and self actualisation of one's potential. For example, personal autonomy refers to the individual being self-sufficient and independent, and not relying on others during hard times.

    Failure to function adequately
    When an individual is unable to cope with everyday activities and life's daily demands, they are considered to be abnormal. This includes an inability to hold a job, unhealthy social relationships as well as no progression through careers.


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    thanks a lot
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    [QUOTE=nat100000;55800463]
    (Original post by undine_monty)
    I have some flashcards I made on stress. There's a 'learn' section where questions are asked on the topics and you just need to answer, If you get them wrong, you have to answer it again in the next round. Its helped me remember a lot of my psychology and sociology especially with the research studies.

    Do you want to use the flashcards?[/QUOTE
    Yes if you don't mind that would be a big help thank you!☺️
    https://quizlet.com/ramblingman13

    Click on the Psychology folder. You dont have to include everything in the flashcards. You could just put a 'star' next to the concepts and learn those separately and leave out the research and evaluations if you want to use your own. It's all from my revision guide
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    (Original post by undine_monty)
    I have some flashcards I made on stress. There's a 'learn' section where questions are asked on the topics and you just need to answer, If you get them wrong, you have to answer it again in the next round. Its helped me remember a lot of my psychology and sociology especially with the research studies

    Do you want to use the flashcards?
    Me too please 🙈
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    (Original post by Marli-Ruth)
    Me too please 🙈
    Link is above
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    (Original post by nat100000)
    Yes well we got told you just need to know about what the baby gets happiness from at each stage and what will happen in the future if fixation occurs at these stages. Eg. Smoking addictions, I hope this helped ☺️
    Thanks!!
    Could you elaborate for me I've got no notes on this! Just remember my teacher mentioning it
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    (Original post by xabsx)
    i thought i might as well post it on here as other people might want to use it for social psychology revision. hope it helps
    Thank you so much
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    Can someone help me out

    How has social influence research helped our understanding of social change? (6)



    whats the difference between downward narrow technique, CBT and REBT ?
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    Yes!
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    (Original post by theasian_csl)
    Can someone help me out

    How has social influence research helped our understanding of social change? (6)



    whats the difference between downward narrow technique, CBT and REBT ?
    Moscovici found that for a minority to be successful they needed the following characteristics: Consistency shows that they truly believe in their views
    Committed to show that they are serious
    Conflict If a minority keep pursuing then members of the majority will start to consider their arguments in closer detail and may change their opinion and join the minority.
    Augmentation Principle Members of the minority are willing to put themselves at risk- shows that they are willing to sacrifice themselves for the cause e.g suicide bombers
    Snowball effect as more and more members from the majority join the minority and soon the minority become the majority and through social crypto amnesia the original minority is forgotten over time.
    Examples: Suffragettes and Terrrorism
    Could also outline moscovici

    REBT is a form of CBT- we haven't studied downward narrow technique

    Hope this helps
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    Hey I am not an A-level student I am doing my GCSEs at the moment, just wanted to ask how you guys are finding the psychology course? I am considering doing it next year I just wanted to get some more opinions on it before I make my final decision.

    Thanks for any help you can give Much appreciated.
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    (Original post by dodgewc25)
    Hey I am not an A-level student I am doing my GCSEs at the moment, just wanted to ask how you guys are finding the psychology course? I am considering doing it next year I just wanted to get some more opinions on it before I make my final decision.

    Thanks for any help you can give Much appreciated.
    You will be following a different spec as it changes next year
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    With no loopa muahajahaj
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    [QUOTE=undine_monty;55803291]
    (Original post by nat100000)

    https://quizlet.com/ramblingman13

    Click on the Psychology folder. You dont have to include everything in the flashcards. You could just put a 'star' next to the concepts and learn those separately and leave out the research and evaluations if you want to use your own. It's all from my revision guide
    Thank you so much!☺️
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    (Original post by dodgewc25)
    Hey I am not an A-level student I am doing my GCSEs at the moment, just wanted to ask how you guys are finding the psychology course? I am considering doing it next year I just wanted to get some more opinions on it before I make my final decision.

    Thanks for any help you can give Much appreciated.
    even though the specs are changing i'm pretty sure you want to know more than about that haha
    it's very interesting to learn about (although it is more interesting in the second year) so you can easily enjoy it especially if you're thinking about a career in the mental health profession/psychology there is a lot of studies you need to know, general research methods which do actually overlap with how science works questions in biology but you'll do fine if you put the time and effort into it
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    [QUOTE=nat100000;55808341]
    (Original post by undine_monty)
    Thank you so much!☺️
    No problem! Good luck on your exams
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    (Original post by Marli-Ruth)
    Thanks!!
    Could you elaborate for me I've got no notes on this! Just remember my teacher mentioning it
    Yes of course, it's freuds psychosexual development, which is part of his psychodynamic approach. According to the theory, whilst a child is developing they go through a series of stages where the id seeks gratification through different erogenous zones. If a child is over or under gratified at one of these stages, it is possible for them to become fixated at this stage and this will have an impact later in adult life.
    1. The oral stage: pleasure is gained from eating and sucking. Weaning is the most important development achievement. Fixation at this stage may cause smoking addictions or eating disorders later in life.
    2. The anal stage: pleasure is gained from controlling bowel movements and bladder control. Becoming 'potty-trained' and using the toilet are key developmental achievements. Fixation at this stage may cause OCD, anxiety or cleanliness problems.
    3. At this stage a child becomes aware of its gender. Gratification comes from stimulation of the genitals. Development at this stage is different between boys and girls. Oedipus complex occurs for boys which is where all boys are in love with there mum and hate their dad and are jealous of him. Electra complex/penis envy occurs for girls, girls have penis envy.
    I don't think you need to know these last 2 but I'll tell you anyway.
    4. Latency stage: the focus is on social development rather than psychosexual. It is sometimes regarded as the calm before the storm of adolescence.
    5. Genital stage: if conflicts earlier in development have been satisfactorily resolved; the greatest pleasure at this stage comes from mature relationships.
    I hope this helps☺️
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    [QUOTE=undine_monty;55808943]
    (Original post by nat100000)

    No problem! Good luck on your exams
    Thank you, you too☺️
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    (Original post by Marli-Ruth)
    PSYA2 question
    when the question says:

    outline and evaluate research into stress related illnesses how do you know whether to talk about cardiovascular and psychiatric disorders or other research such as the Glaser and Cohen?
    We did two studies conducted by Kieloct Glasser that was about stress and illness/ the immune system with the natural killer cell and a bunch biopsy, it's which ever one talks about illness or the immune system ☺️
 
 
 
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