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    Wiki says: wrist flexor

    "The palmaris longus muscle itself is a weak flexor, and provides no substantial flexing force that would inhibit movement in the wrist if its tendon was cut and moved elsewhere. "
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    Thanks Plantaris is also another "weak flexor" so I'm going to assume it's another vestigial muscle. Our anatomy teacher hasn't really mentioned it in his book, apart from it being labelled on the diagram, so I don't see what else I can say about it :dontknow:
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Really quick question that needs a quick answer. What's the function of palmaris longus? Is it a vestigial muscle like plantaris in the leg? I'm assuming it is since it's apparently missing ~15% of the population.....

    Thanks
    Gray's: Flexes wrist joint; because the palmar aponeurosis anchors skin of the hand, contraction of the muscle resists shearing forces when gripping.
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Gray's: Flexes wrist joint; because the palmar aponeurosis anchors skin of the hand, contraction of the muscle resists shearing forces when gripping.
    Shearing forces? :confused:
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    I actually like Immunology. It's just my view of every area of medicine this year is pretty tainted considering I've been doing it repeatedly for so long :p:
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    vwlhd ouewdvoueg fouwg ovug oug ewvouewbf

    Frustrated with work.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    You guys must have heard about the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Anyone believe that sort of stuff has one jot of credibility? It's fine for a bit of fun... I guess, if you're into that sort of thing. But that's as far as it should go.

    My uni is holding some careers session/MBTI workshop. This is an actual quote:



    I can't believe an institution like Imperial (or Oxbridge, UCL etc or any other academic/research institute) seems to be sponsoring this rubbish as something scientific. Next they'll have ****ing Astrology Workshops.

    This stuff has already been discredited. And they want potential suckers students to pay £5 for the privilege.

    I want to actually complain.
    We got to do it for free here! I found it interesting, but I wouldn't let it shoehorn me into a career. Though it did spark off a massive debate on what we disagreed with it on (I think introvert/extrovert is a continuum rather than completely separate like they allege)
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    We got to do it for free here! I found it interesting, but I wouldn't let it shoehorn me into a career. Though it did spark off a massive debate on what we disagreed with it on (I think introvert/extrovert is a continuum rather than completely separate like they allege)
    I think it's pseudoscience junk, and should come with a warning, not an indication for use. :mad:
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Shearing forces? :confused:
    not sure, i think it means that it can resist frictional forces that stretch the skin....
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    Question:

    Is it necessary/advantageous to intercalate with an Anatomy BSc if pursuing a future career in surgery?
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    Most probably not. Publishing lots of paper or doing a higher degree with research etc. after your medical degree, sure.
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Shearing forces? :confused:
    I think (didn't do A level physics) it has something to do with force applied at a tangent rather than perpendicularly. Palmaris longus is left over from the days when we used to swing through the trees and couldn't afford to lose grip.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    I think (didn't do A level physics) it has something to do with force applied at a tangent rather than perpendicularly. Palmaris longus is left over from the days when we used to swing through the trees and couldn't afford to lose grip.
    So it is a vestigial muscle. Not that it matters anymore since I've posted up my work now :p:
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    So it is a vestigial muscle. Not that it matters anymore since I've posted up my work now :p:
    )


    I dissected the flexor compartment last week.
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    zzzzz anatomy
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    (Original post by visesh)
    Most probably not. Publishing lots of paper or doing a higher degree with research etc. after your medical degree, sure.
    Another degree after medicine doesn't sound like something i'd want to do. But you mentioned getting papers published...this will sound like a stupid/ignorant question, but is it very hard to do that? do many surgical applicants have a few under their belt when they apply? What do the papers have to be about?

    thanks!
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Another degree after medicine doesn't sound like something i'd want to do. But you mentioned getting papers published...this will sound like a stupid/ignorant question, but is it very hard to do that? do many surgical applicants have a few under their belt when they apply? What do the papers have to be about?

    thanks!
    A higher degree is almost required for higher surgical training, but you don't stop working to do it - most are part time alongside your training post. Papers are usually research and audits you've done, since case reports seem to be falling out of favour, preferably related to surgery.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    A higher degree is almost required for higher surgical training, but you don't stop working to do it - most are part time alongside your training post. Papers are usually research and audits you've done, since case reports seem to be falling out of favour, preferably related to surgery.
    Ah right, so basically all of this would happen after i've graduated then? so i'm allowed to do whatever i want for my iBSc given that an anatomy degree isn't particularly favoured upon?
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Ah right, so basically all of this would happen after i've graduated then? so i'm allowed to do whatever i want for my iBSc given that an anatomy degree isn't particularly favoured upon?
    Well yeh, you can't do a higher degree without having a bachelors to start with :tongue: The last surgery conference I went to, they said it didn't matter what you did your iBSc in, so long as you do one.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Well yeh, you can't do a higher degree without having a bachelors to start with :tongue: The last surgery conference I went to, they said it didn't matter what you did your iBSc in, so long as you do one.
    Ok cool, that's cleared it up for me :yy:
 
 
 
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