Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by it's a me, mario)
    How comes youre not sure what's in f214 and whats in f215?

    Surely you have the ocr textbook, no?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yeah I just didn't realise what was in what exam :/
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alexthehuman)
    Im sorry if this has already been asked but im new to the thread. I can't find the 2014 f214 paper anywhere. Does anyone have it or know what the big questions were?
    There were a lot of questions about vegetables

    Like onions and asparagus and shiz

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hajs)
    After a prolonged period of fasting, glycogen levels in the liver are depleted. However the liver can still produce glucose by the process of gluconeogenesis. Describe one way in which this is done?

    Anyone gonna try to answer that? I found it really difficult lol..
    Protein can be converted to glucose in glucogenesis
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Does cyclic and non-cyclic photophosphorylation occur at the same time? And if so, how does it work because in cyclic PSI electrons are returned to PSI, but in non-cyclic, PSI gets electrons from PSII?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nk96)
    Does cyclic and non-cyclic photophosphorylation occur at the same time? And if so, how does it work because in cyclic PSI electrons are returned to PSI, but in non-cyclic, PSI gets electrons from PSII?
    In non-cyclic, water undergos photolysis to form H+ and electrons
    Photolysis is splitting of water using light

    The electrons from water replace those lost from PSII
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by baymax96)
    Please can someone give a detailed summary of selective reabsorption in the pct. I'm so confused by it :confused: :'(
    Sodium/potassium ion pump actively removes Na+ from cells lining pct
    Na enter back the cell in association with glucose through cotransporter proteins
    Glucose diffuses back into the blood
    Water potential in filtrate increases
    H20 enters cells by osmosis
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    Can someone please explain all the G words for me please, getting a little confused :/ (like glycogenesis etc)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hajs)
    After a prolonged period of fasting, glycogen levels in the liver are depleted. However the liver can still produce glucose by the process of gluconeogenesis. Describe one way in which this is done?

    Anyone gonna try to answer that? I found it really difficult lol..

    Gluconeogenesis from fatty acids right? was this a PPQ?
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    Any predictions for tomorrow?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Lol as if some guy on here was supposedly revising the f215 topics for the exam tomorrow!! thats jokes
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by coolerthanbeans)
    amino acids + fats = glucose
    = gluconeogenesis
    Glucose isn't made by a reaction between amino acids and fats. It's fats and/or amino acids entering the krebs cycle and then doing glycolysis in reverse (bar a few reactions) to form glucose. The two don't bind together.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rich*****)
    What's the vagus nerve and what does it do???


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The vagus nerve (also know as the decelerator nerve) connects the medulla oblongata in the brain to the sinoatrial node (SAN) in the heart. Action potentials are sent down it to decrease the frequency of contractions of the heart muscle, reducing the heart rate. The opposite is the accelerator nerve which is the same except action potentials sent down it increase the frequency of contractions, raising heart rate.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lighfy)
    Can't glucose be produced by combining fatty acids and amino acids together?
    (Original post by Munrot07)
    Gluconeogenesis is the process of converting amino acids, fats and nucleic acids into glucose. Certain amino acids can be bled into the krebs cycle and then go through reverse glycolysis (bar a few reactions) and are turned back to glucose. Pyrimidines can do this as well (purines can not).
    Thats what i thought. The answer however is...
    either
    deaminationof amino acids / removal of NH2 from amino acids ;
    pyruvate/ carbon skeleton / AW ;
    triosephosphate / TP ;condensation/ increasing number of carbon atoms ;
    or
    breakdownof, lipid / triglyceride ;
    glycerol;
    triosephosphate / TP ;
    condensation/ increasing number of carbon atoms ; max3
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alexthehuman)
    Im sorry if this has already been asked but im new to the thread. I can't find the 2014 f214 paper anywhere. Does anyone have it or know what the big questions were?
    Bro, you can find the june 2014 papers here

    http://www.thebiotutor.com/past-papers3.html

    :yes:

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ZQ110)
    In non-cyclic, water undergos photolysis to form H+ and electrons
    Photolysis is splitting of water using light

    The electrons from water replace those lost from PSII
    My main Q was do they occur at the same time.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by loperdoper)
    I'm going to assume the main point is that not all the water is lost in the descending limb. The water potential gradient is there, but by the time it's passed into the ascending limb some of it hasn't diffused out into the capillaries yet. That's why ADH can have an affect to vary it - not all of the water diffuses out of the collecting duct either, so aquaporins can help it along a bit more.


    http://www.thebiotutor.com/past-papers3.html
    Amazing! Thank you so much
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lawalke)
    Gluconeogenesis from fatty acids right? was this a PPQ?
    One of the q's on the old spec
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by domcandrews)
    Lol as if some guy on here was supposedly revising the f215 topics for the exam tomorrow!! thats jokes
    What's F215? :/
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PropaneHorcrux)
    Can someone please explain all the G words for me please, getting a little confused :/ (like glycogenesis etc)
    Gluconeogenesis- Production of 'new' glucose - genesis- think formation

    Glycogenolysis- Break down of glycogen- Lysis= Breakdown Glyco- like glycogen

    Glycogenesis- Production of glycogen - like i said before -gylco= glycogen Genesis- formation

    Hope this helps
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PropaneHorcrux)
    Can someone please explain all the G words for me please, getting a little confused :/ (like glycogenesis etc)
    Glucose - a carbohydrate
    Glycogen - animal carbohydrate storage molecule
    Glucagon - hormone that increases blood glucose
    Glycolysis - Breaking down of glucose to form pyruvate, first stage of respiration
    Glycogenolysis - Breaking down of glycogen to glucose
    Glycogenesis - Glycogen synthesis from glucose
    Gluconeogenesis - Formation of new glucose from animo acids and fatty acids.

    I think that's all
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.