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    (Original post by Sarang_assa)
    I'm glad you've done what you feel is best I hope things work out for you xx
    Thanks. I hope so too but really at a loss at the moment about what I am going to do next. Loved the A-level side of things, and wished I could just teach that but It was never going to happen. teaching the lower years didn't agree with me e.g. behaviour, pastoral side of things.


    Interested in tutoring, but don't know where to start, how much work I would get, and whether I could make a career out of it.
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    (Original post by xxmijxx)
    I'm glad you figured out what you wanted to do, now just try and keep an eye out for what you really wanna get into and enjoy all the relaxing time!!!!
    I'm too worried about what is going to happen next to be able to sit relaxing - although it is good to get rid of all that rubbish I was having to put up with on placement and dreading going in each day.
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    (Original post by John Mullen)
    I'm too worried about what is going to happen next to be able to sit relaxing - although it is good to get rid of all that rubbish I was having to put up with on placement and dreading going in each day.
    It is scary but you will find something! Plus the amount you did put into our PGCE will have to count for something!!!!
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    (Original post by John Mullen)
    Thanks. I hope so too but really at a loss at the moment about what I am going to do next. Loved the A-level side of things, and wished I could just teach that but It was never going to happen. teaching the lower years didn't agree with me e.g. behaviour, pastoral side of things.


    Interested in tutoring, but don't know where to start, how much work I would get, and whether I could make a career out of it.
    I don't know whether this is exactly what you're after, but maybe see if you can get some work in an adult education centre or a college or something? You said you enjoyed A-levels and that kind of age range, so maybe see how that goes? Hope you find something anyway
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    Teaching a whole 5 lessons tomorrow - eek!
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Teaching a whole 5 lessons tomorrow - eek!
    You'll be fine! I find that teaching a whole day is easier because you build up a momentum. Good luck


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    (Original post by myblueheaven339)
    You'll be fine! I find that teaching a whole day is easier because you build up a momentum. Good luck
    I'm mostly worried about getting flustered/losing or forgetting resources because I'm in 4 different classrooms over the course of the day. If I was in one classroom all day I think it would be a lot less scary.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    I'm mostly worried about getting flustered/losing or forgetting resources because I'm in 4 different classrooms over the course of the day. If I was in one classroom all day I think it would be a lot less scary.
    I have days where I'm in lots of different rooms. Just make sure you've got everything sorted and a big bag to carry it in! Can you leave your resources in the room until your lesson? That way they'll be ready for you.


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    (Original post by myrtille)
    I'm mostly worried about getting flustered/losing or forgetting resources because I'm in 4 different classrooms over the course of the day. If I was in one classroom all day I think it would be a lot less scary.
    I teach 5 in a row on a Wednesday ( by contrast I have 1 lesson on a Thursday). I get to school v.early, and I have cardboard folders for each lesson, and I just go around and leave them on the bookshelf in each room (rooms are usually open as the cleaners are still in its so early). so that way I only need to shuttle myself, my pencil case, my planner, some detention slips, a board clicker and a marker between classrooms. I still get flustered, and by lunch I usually can't remember my own name, let alone which language I am supposed to be teaching, but you do get into the flow.
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    (Original post by John Mullen)
    Thanks. I hope so too but really at a loss at the moment about what I am going to do next. Loved the A-level side of things, and wished I could just teach that but It was never going to happen. teaching the lower years didn't agree with me e.g. behaviour, pastoral side of things.


    Interested in tutoring, but don't know where to start, how much work I would get, and whether I could make a career out of it.
    I've also just quit the PGCE too :-)

    I was in a similar position to you - I had a real dilemma over whether I should finish the year or not, but in the end, I decided there was no point in dedicating 100% of my time and energy over the next 4 months, to something I didn't want to do.

    I also loved A-Level, but it was everything else that just wasn't what I thought it would be, and the rewards simply weren't great enough.

    It's weird to not be going into school (this if my first complete week off since quitting), but it is great, although I do feel guilty about not doing anything.

    I now need to work out my next steps, but I have no regret at all about quitting the PGCE - it was definitely the right decision, and I'm glad I'm out of a profession I know I couldn't commit myself too.
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    (Original post by AndyXL)
    I've also just quit the PGCE too :-)

    I was in a similar position to you - I had a real dilemma over whether I should finish the year or not, but in the end, I decided there was no point in dedicating 100% of my time and energy over the next 4 months, to something I didn't want to do.

    I also loved A-Level, but it was everything else that just wasn't what I thought it would be, and the rewards simply weren't great enough.

    It's weird to not be going into school (this if my first complete week off since quitting), but it is great, although I do feel guilty about not doing anything.

    I now need to work out my next steps, but I have no regret at all about quitting the PGCE - it was definitely the right decision, and I'm glad I'm out of a profession I know I couldn't commit myself too.
    We are living parallel lives here!
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    (Original post by smartarse1983)
    I teach 5 in a row on a Wednesday ( by contrast I have 1 lesson on a Thursday). I get to school v.early, and I have cardboard folders for each lesson, and I just go around and leave them on the bookshelf in each room (rooms are usually open as the cleaners are still in its so early). so that way I only need to shuttle myself, my pencil case, my planner, some detention slips, a board clicker and a marker between classrooms. I still get flustered, and by lunch I usually can't remember my own name, let alone which language I am supposed to be teaching, but you do get into the flow.
    It went OK!

    I put any worksheets I needed in the classrooms in the morning, and when possible loaded powerpoints onto teachers computers before registration/at break so I wouldn't have to mess around with my memory stick. So in my bag I just had a folder with lesson plans, class lists and some pens/board markers.

    I did have a brief moment of confusion as to whether I was supposed to be speaking French or Spanish, but soon got into it again. Three out of five lessons went pretty well, so I don't think that's too awful for my first week of this placement. Just a couple of classes I really need to crack, behaviour-wise, but they're pretty badly behaved for my mentor as well so not sure how much success I can expect...
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    Just wanted to say that this thread is a lifeline for us to reflect on the fact that we aren't alone.
    My peers seem to be 'oh its do wonderful' types and kiss up at any given opportunity.

    I must have thought about quitting 40 times.

    Can I ask Andy XL - glad you feel better now you've quit, however what now happens with your student loan repayment, etc?

    Good luck to everyone suffering
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    (Original post by bigdon)
    Just wanted to say that this thread is a lifeline for us to reflect on the fact that we aren't alone.
    My peers seem to be 'oh its do wonderful' types and kiss up at any given opportunity.

    I must have thought about quitting 40 times.

    Can I ask Andy XL - glad you feel better now you've quit, however what now happens with your student loan repayment, etc?

    Good luck to everyone suffering
    It's quite complicated, but here's what happens with loans, grants etc:

    1. Student bursary (monthly payments for certain subjects). You do not have to pay back the bursaries for the months you were on the course; these are written off. However, if you quit a few days or a few weeks after receipt of the bursary for that month, this is repayable.

    2. Tuition fees - check the cut off date for this. I quit my course at the beginning of March, and the University has told me they will refund the Student Loans Company half the fees (£4,500), so my student loan for fees only remains £4,500.

    3. Other student loans - you keep whatever money you got, but in addition to half the tuition fee loan, this is added to your student loan total (which you repay out of your salary when you earn over a certain threshold).

    4. Student grant - now this one I'm not 100% sure on, but I think, in the same way as the bursary, it simply gets written off, but I need to double check with this.

    So to sum up, the financial consequences of quitting the course depend on the time of month in relation to the bursary, and the time of year when the University charges tuition fees. If you leave it until after Easter to quit, the full tuition fee might be payable.

    Let me know if you have any other questions.

    Whilst searching for jobs is hard work, I'm hugely relieved to have quit the PGCE, and it was definitely the right decision.
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    Easter is coming everyone! I'm not sure this is necessarily a good thing as I don't feel I've progressed as much as I'd like however a welcome break from the busyness! Is anyone else a bit worried abut how fast time is flying by?
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    I feel very anxious when I'm in class or when it's nearly time to go to work. Does anyone else get this? I constantly doubt my ability as a teacher.
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    I might be weird but I don't normally feel that anxious about the lessons themselves.

    What I dread is going home after school in the knowledge that I will have to work another 5 hours that evening just to keep on top of planning!

    I've done all my planning for school tomorrow to leave cover work for the teachers and now have got to plan an interview lesson for tomorrow. Hoped to have a break from lesson planning at the weekend since we break up for Easter on Friday, but have got 2 more interviews next week as well (unless I get the one tomorrow, of course!). It's just non-stop at the moment...
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    I might be weird but I don't normally feel that anxious about the lessons themselves.

    What I dread is going home after school in the knowledge that I will have to work another 5 hours that evening just to keep on top of planning!

    I've done all my planning for school tomorrow to leave cover work for the teachers and now have got to plan an interview lesson for tomorrow. Hoped to have a break from lesson planning at the weekend since we break up for Easter on Friday, but have got 2 more interviews next week as well (unless I get the one tomorrow, of course!). It's just non-stop at the moment...
    Just a bit of advice, I would definitely go to all the interviews before deciding which job you want :yep:
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    Is it becoming increasingly normal for schools to ask you to teach full lessons at interview? My Uni gave me the impression that 20 to 25 mins would be the norm, but of the 3 interviews I've attended, I've had to teach full hour lessons at all 3.
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    (Original post by Becca)
    Just a bit of advice, I would definitely go to all the interviews before deciding which job you want :yep:
    We've been told by the university that this isn't possible as you normally have to make a decision on the day. Apparently some schools might let you have 'til the following day to think about it but I doubt they'd let me have a week.

    To be honest, the first and second are the ones I'm most interested in anyway though, so fingers crossed!

    smartarse - For my first interview I was asked to teach a 40 minute lesson. The 3 I've got coming up are 25 minutes, 30 minutes and 1 hour. So there doesn't seem to be any particular rule to it.
 
 
 
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