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    (Original post by noble.)
    ah right, fair enough. Probably a good choice, i prefer oxford's course to cambridge's :giggle:
    Hi five! Oxford I think is on par with Cambridge if I'm honest. Taking the MAT so early on in the year and being expected to score in the high 70's is certainly not straightforward, especially without having had time to practise from A Level maths to uni-style. Did you score 100% on it? People like you and Teodor von Burg just show how Oxford is so underrated.
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    (Original post by nahomyemane778)
    Well good luck, I'm sure you'll have no problems this year
    Hmm I'm not so sure. From what I gather Merton interviews are not so straightforward, lol. And don't worry if my grades seem high, honestly if you worked as hard as I did you probably would have done much better. It just takes practise, and to an extent, a small amount of mathematical insight.
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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Hmm I'm not so sure. From what I gather Merton interviews are not so straightforward, lol. And don't worry if my grades seem high, honestly if you worked as hard as I did you probably would have done much better. It just takes practise, and to an extent, a small amount of mathematical insight.
    You can multiquote using the little speechmark button next to the reply button of the people you want to quote .
    (Instead of making two successive posts)
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    (Original post by nahomyemane778)
    You can multiquote using the little speechmark button next to the reply button of the people you want to quote .
    (Instead of making two successive posts)
    Cool, duly noted. Which college did you apply for btw? May I ask, have you chosen your insurance as yet? I would recommend you to choose warwick, it has a great department as well as a great campus!
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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Hi five! Oxford I think is on par with Cambridge if I'm honest. Taking the MAT so early on in the year and being expected to score in the high 70's is certainly not straightforward, especially without having had time to practise from A Level maths to uni-style. Did you score 100% on it? People like you and Teodor von Burg just show how Oxford is so underrated.
    No, I didn't get 100% (I got ~95%). I'm nothing like Teodor though, I'm just someone who could do very well on the MAT from the first past paper. Unfortunately, as you probably found out, University mathematics involves too much of this thing called 'hard-work' and not enough natural ability, so it became much more of a level playing field post-MAT (although, undoubtedly, I could get a very high first if I worked hard - but then again, pretty much everyone could).

    I don't know when you last looked at Oxford's syllabus, but my year (second years) are currently the guinea pigs to the new syllabus which, as any tutor I've spoken to has mentioned, is quite a bit harder than the previous syllabus (a lot of the increased difficult is coming from the change in exam format, there are more exams and the exams have a lot less choice, for the most part) so you can't get away with 'forgetting' about one module without risking crap performance in that exam (whereas on the older syllabus, you could get away with knowing ~70% of the syllabus very well, half forgetting the rest, and end up with a first).
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    No, I didn't get 100% (I got ~95%). I'm nothing like Teodor though, I'm just someone who could do very well on the MAT from the first past paper. Unfortunately, as you probably found out, University mathematics involves too much of this thing called 'hard-work' and not enough natural ability, so it became much more of a level playing field post-MAT (although, undoubtedly, I could get a very high first if I worked hard - but then again, pretty much everyone could).

    I don't know when you last looked at Oxford's syllabus, but my year (second years) are currently the guinea pigs to the new syllabus which, as any tutor I've spoken to has mentioned, is quite a bit harder than the previous syllabus (a lot of the increased difficult is coming from the change in exam format, there are more exams and the exams have a lot less choice, for the most part) so you can't get away with 'forgetting' about one module without risking crap performance in that exam (whereas on the older syllabus, you could get away with knowing ~70% of the syllabus very well, half forgetting the rest, and end up with a first).
    Erm, well in my books that is incredibly impressive, I only managed about 85-90 this year based on my calculations. I agree that at university it is a lot more hard work, but I don't think that it limits your innate ability from shining. For example, scoring 100% on an Analysis homework having spent less than 2 hours on it requires a combination of inspiration as well as hard work. That being said there are topics e.g group theory which look devilishly difficult (for me).
    Oxford's syllabus correlates pretty well to Warwick's I believe, but I am not entirely sure (I'll make sure to check it out pre-interview!). Are the questions testing rote learning or actual problem solving ability? Sometimes I find its possible to do well at this level having only memorised some proofs and be able to reproduce them. Not that I mind doing that.
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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Erm, well in my books that is incredibly impressive, I only managed about 85-90 this year based on my calculations. I agree that at university it is a lot more hard work, but I don't think that it limits your innate ability from shining. For example, scoring 100% on an Analysis homework having spent less than 2 hours on it requires a combination of inspiration as well as hard work. That being said there are topics e.g group theory which look devilishly difficult (for me).
    Oxford's syllabus correlates pretty well to Warwick's I believe, but I am not entirely sure (I'll make sure to check it out pre-interview!). Are the questions testing rote learning or actual problem solving ability? Sometimes I find its possible to do well at this level having only memorised some proofs and be able to reproduce them. Not that I mind doing that.
    Group theory is difficult at first, but it's a thoroughly beautiful subject, as well as being intuitive. It also has some elegant consequences, like reducing proofs of Fermat's Little Theorem/Euler's Theorem to one line.

    In regards to whether question test rote learning or problem solving, the problem sheets are entirely problem solving, there's obviously not much point getting someone to write down what's in the notes, nor is it interesting to talk about in a tute. The exams are part 'rote learning' and part problem solving. I say 'rote learning' because the rote learning parts are actually proof questions usually, which you will have seen, but are obviously fundamental to proper understanding (and proofs are a big part of mathematics as well).
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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Nice one! I sat BMO2 last year, almost qualifying for the Trinity camp. I am actually on a gap year studying my first year at Warwick university.
    That's nice! Which parts of olympiad maths do you like the most, if I may ask?

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    [QUOTE=seohyun;45420328]I'm a home applicant and I only got a letter from Keble, no email. I'm applying for Computer Science.



    I see so it's the college then, mine is pure maths from Keble
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    (Original post by souktik)
    That's nice! Which parts of olympiad maths do you like the most, if I may ask?

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    Olympiad maths is very intuitive so if you are creative and mathematically inclined it can be fun. I like all of it, even the topics Im not very good at. I'm strongest with the geometry, number theory and inequalities. In terms of which Olympiad I prefer, I think the BMO 2 stuff is really rather fascinating, and the AIME questions to ease me into Olympiad maths. Not a fan of combinatorics that being said, as they require heavy insights which are not always obvious.

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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Olympiad maths is very intuitive so if you are creative and mathematically inclined it can be fun. I like all of it, even the topics Im not very good at. I'm strongest with the geometry, number theory and inequalities. In terms of which Olympiad I prefer, I think the BMO 2 stuff is really rather fascinating, and the AIME questions to ease me into Olympiad maths. Not a fan of combinatorics that being said, as they require heavy insights which are not always obvious.

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    Ah, too bad. I love combinatorics and it's geometry that causes me heartache every year.

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    (Original post by souktik)
    Ah, too bad. I love combinatorics and it's geometry that causes me heartache every year.

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    Try out this question, its a gem of a combinatorics BMO2:

    N dwarfs of heights 1,2,3...N are arranged in a circle. For each pair of neighbouring dwarfs the positive difference between the heights is calculated. V is the sum of these differences. Find the max and min values of V.

    The min value is trivial. hint: use the triangle inequality.
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    (Original post by TSR561)
    So is it right to say around 1 in 2 interviewees will be rejected (if ~20% get accepted)?
    It's impossible to say for sure, as there's a little flexibility within the number that each college takes for each subject. I think it's more likely that the overall acceptance rate across CompSci will be something like 15% of all applicants. So very roughly about 30% of those who are interviewed will be offered a place. We had quite an increase in the number of applications this year, but the number of places will be about the same. So competition is even tougher this year. (Sorry.)
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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Try out this question, its a gem of a combinatorics BMO2:

    N dwarfs of heights 1,2,3...N are arranged in a circle. For each pair of neighbouring dwarfs the positive difference between the heights is calculated. V is the sum of these differences. Find the max and min values of V.

    The min value is trivial. hint: use the triangle inequality.
    This looks interesting. Let me think. Umm, yeah, finding the minimum is trivial (unless I've misunderstood something). 2(n-1), right? I haven't worked it out on paper, but I'm pretty sure that the proof I'm thinking of will work. I don't see how the triangle inequality comes into this, but never mind. I'll try to find the maximum now.

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    (Original post by souktik)
    This looks interesting. Let me think. Umm, yeah, finding the minimum is trivial (unless I've misunderstood something). 2(n-1), right? I haven't worked it out on paper, but I'm pretty sure that the proof I'm thinking of will work. I don't see how the triangle inequality comes into this, but never mind. I'll try to find the maximum now.

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    I think u have an intuitive answer but this still doesn't constitute a proof. The triangle inequality is used as we are dealing with modulus signs so it's trivial as V >= mod(2a).

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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    I think u have an intuitive answer but this still doesn't constitute a proof, plus the answer you got is wrong I'm afraid. The triangle inequality is used as we are dealing with modulus signs so it's trivial as V >= mod( 2a) since we can use any value from 1 to N of a, we get V>= 2N

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    How are you defining a?
    Look at the simple configuration 1,2...n. Here, the value of V is 2n-2; so your answer can't be correct, right?
    And I do have a proof, it's just hard to type from my phone. I have a problem set to complete before flying out for a camp tomorrow, so I can't really come online.

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    (Original post by NewtonsApple)
    Cool, duly noted. Which college did you apply for btw? May I ask, have you chosen your insurance as yet? I would recommend you to choose warwick, it has a great department as well as a great campus!
    I have applied to Balliol.
    My insurance shall be Imperial or Warwick.
    Yourself?
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    (Original post by souktik)
    How are you defining a?
    Look at the simple configuration 1,2...n. Here, the value of V is 2n-2; so your answer can't be correct, right?
    And I do have a proof, it's just hard to type from my phone. I have a problem set to complete before flying out for a camp tomorrow, so I can't really come online.

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    Sorry that is wrong. Consider n=2. v=1 This doesnt satisfy your formula.
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    (Original post by Oxford Computer Science Dept)
    It's impossible to say for sure, as there's a little flexibility within the number that each college takes for each subject. I think it's more likely that the overall acceptance rate across CompSci will be something like 15% of all applicants. So very roughly about 30% of those who are interviewed will be offered a place. We had quite an increase in the number of applications this year, but the number of places will be about the same. So competition is even tougher this year. (Sorry.)
    Wow, that definitely sounds like a challenge haha.
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    (Original post by souktik)
    How are you defining a?
    Look at the simple configuration 1,2...n. Here, the value of V is 2n-2; so your answer can't be correct, right?
    And I do have a proof, it's just hard to type from my phone. I have a problem set to complete before flying out for a camp tomorrow, so I can't really come online.

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    Let N=2.

    Now, V can take only one value: V=1. This is both the maximum and the minimum possible value of V.

    Now, let N=3. Again, V can take only one value: V=4. And again this is both the maximum and minimum value of V.


    Whatever expressions you come up for the maximum and minimum values of V must both satisfy max(1)=min(1)=1 and max(2)=min(2)=4.
 
 
 
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