Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cuppycake3)
    is the more negative electrode the hydrogen one? how would i know?

    sorry I'm being so silly I'm just nervous thank you for your help

    Yeah the hydrogen one is the more negative one.

    Think of it this way, the more negative one is on the left, the more positive is one the right
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ejsjwwj)
    Yeah the hydrogen one is the more negative one.

    Think of it this way, the more negative one is on the left, the more positive is one the right
    so its nothing with emf tables and clockwise rule then?

    i was trying to put the more positive one under the other cell and then apply clockwise rule lol
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cuppycake3)
    is the more negative electrode the hydrogen one? how would i know?

    sorry I'm being so silly I'm just nervous thank you for your help
    Reduction occurs at positive electrode. Just remember that and you'll be fine
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Someone help please
    Why do you x2 for -348 and not 158?
    Question 1biii in June 2010 paper
    Attachment 554339
    Mark scheme: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...W-MS-JUN10.PDF


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    X2 for fluorine because one mole of a fluorine molecule becomes two moles of fluorine atoms (F2 -> 2F) which isn't true for calcium.
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by zombaldia)
    Reduction occurs at positive electrode. Just remember that and you'll be fine
    You don't know how much that's cleared something up for me...

    I always did:

    E cell = E RHS - E LHS
    = reduction - oxidation
    = cathode - anode

    And now:
    = positive electrode - negative electrode
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Suits101)
    X2 for fluorine because one mole of a fluorine molecule becomes two moles of fluorine atoms (F2 -> 2F) which isn't true for calcium.
    But one mole becomes two moles in atomisation, not affinity


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cuppycake3)
    so its nothing with emf tables and clockwise rule then?

    i was trying to put the more positive one under the other cell and then apply clockwise rule lol
    Im not sure what this clockwise rule is, but the value of the hydrogen in the emf table should be lower than the other one, so you use the equation given in the table for hydrogen, then you reverse it and then cancel out electrons and combine
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Suits101)
    You don't know how much that's cleared something up for me...

    I always did:

    E cell = E RHS - E LHS
    = reduction - oxidation
    = cathode - anode
    isn't it anode- cathode?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...W-MS-JAN13.PDF

    Can someone explain 3ci
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi! Would someone be able to explain how to do Chem5's take on q=mc/\T?
    It's 2cii http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...5-QP-JUN13.PDF
    Thanks!!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Is anyone able to explain June 2010 question 7d about the percentage? Thank you!!
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by blueberry389)
    isn't it anode- cathode?
    If it is then that'd solve my problems give me a min might've made a typing error.

    Just checked - if it's red - ox when surely it's cath - ano?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    What do you need explaining?

    It's just using the equation:
    Delta G = Delta H - T(Delta S)

    so when Delta G = 0,
    T = Delta H/Delta S


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    does anyone know how to do calculation 8C for june 13 paper chem 5
    thank you
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 132
Size:  416.9 KB

    Can someone explain to me why hydrogen cell is on the left hand side in conventional cell representation(this is my wrong answer).

    I thought more negative Electrode potentials are on the left of cell representation?
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by Engineerrookie)
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 132
Size:  416.9 KB

    Can someone explain to me why hydrogen cell is on the left hand side in conventional cell representation(this is my wrong answer).

    I thought more negative Electrode potentials are on the left of cell representation?
    You are right, HOWEVER, when using SHE it is always on the left (IUPAC rules)
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 26december)
    What do you need explaining?

    It's just using the equation:
    Delta G = Delta H - T(Delta S)

    so when Delta G = 0,
    T = Delta H/Delta S


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Delta is products - reactants right? Why we halving O2?

    2H2 + O2 -> 2H2O
    Do the coefficients matter?

    cus products -reactants : 2(189) - 2(131) -2(105)

    so idk
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by Bloom77)
    But one mole becomes two moles in atomisation, not affinity


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    When you atomise it, you get 2F.

    When you do electron affinity you the have to do it for both F atoms hence 2 X value
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Suits101)
    You don't know how much that's cleared something up for me...

    I always did:

    E cell = E RHS - E LHS
    = reduction - oxidation
    = cathode - anode

    And now:
    = positive electrode - negative electrode
    A lot of chemistry is just trying to simplify it. At least for me anyway. Try use notes on chemrevise for chem5 if you would like some good notes
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ss3128593)
    does anyone know how to do calculation 8C for june 13 paper chem 5
    thank you
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.