This discussion is closed.
M_rudky
Badges:
#1
Report 17 years ago
#1
Please tell me which ones are correct.

1.I will go on this week. or I will go in this week

2.I will hold a party at this weeken. or

I will hold a party on this weeken.

3. It was so popular in the 1980s

or

It was so popular in 1980s.

Thanks in advance,

Rudky
0
Hananet
Badges:
#2
Report 17 years ago
#2
"M_RUDKY" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> Please tell me which ones are correct.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> 1.I will go on this week.[/q1]

I will continue to infinitive / this week
[q1]> or I will go in this week[/q1]

I will go somewhere within this week
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> 2.I will hold a party at this weeken. or[/q1]
I will hold a party / at this weekend
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I will hold a party on this weeken.[/q1]
I will hold a party on / this weekend

[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> 3. It was so popular in the 1980s[/q1]

when compared with another time
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> or[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> It was so popular in 1980s.[/q1]

without being compared with other time
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Thanks in advance,[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Rudky[/q1]

but I am not sure .....
0
Cybercypher
Badges:
#3
Report 17 years ago
#3
[email protected] (M_RUDKY) burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> Please tell me which ones are correct.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> 1.I will go on this week. or I will go in this week[/q1]

I'm afraid that these two choices make no sense, What are they talking about? They both lack a
context. Given the porper context, both could be correct.

[q1]> 2.I will hold a party at this weeken. or I will hold a party on this weeken.[/q1]

It depends on whether you're wirting/speaking British or American English. If it's American English,
then it's neither of the above but "I will hold a party this weekend".

[q1]> 3. It was so popular in the 1980s or It was so popular in 1980s.[/q1]

It has to be "It was so popular in the 1980s", but it would be better if the "so" were deleted.
--
Franke
0
Einde O'Callagh
Badges:
#4
Report 17 years ago
#4
CyberCypher wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> [email protected] (M_RUDKY) burbled news:[email protected]:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Please tell me which ones are correct.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > 1.I will go on this week. or I will go in this week[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I'm afraid that these two choices make no sense, What are they talking about? They both lack a[/q1]
[q1]> context. Given the porper context, both could be correct.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
This depends on whether he is asking a question about prepositions and time phrases or not. If it is
about which preposition to use with "this week" after the verb "go" then neither is correct; the
correct sentence would be "I will go this week." If we are talking about the phrasal verbs "go in"
and "go on" then both would be correct

[q2]> > 2.I will hold a party at this weeken. or I will hold a party on this weeken.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> It depends on whether you're wirting/speaking British or American English. If it's American[/q1]
[q1]> English, then it's neither of the above but "I will hold a party this weekend".[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
This is also correct in British English. The difference between "at the weekend" (British) and "on
the weekend" (American) is usually concerned with habitual acticity or in sentences like the above
only with the determiner "the". So the sentence "I will hold a party at the weekend" is correct in
British English and means the same as "I will hold a party this weekend." I'm not certain whether "I
will hold a party on the weekend" is correct in American English.

I would, however, point out that for me "I'm going to hold a party ..." is more natural than "I will
hold a party ..." since the latter implies that I've just decided now to hold a party.

[q2]> > 3. It was so popular in the 1980s or It was so popular in 1980s.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> It has to be "It was so popular in the 1980s", but it would be better if the "so" were deleted.[/q1]

Agreed.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
0
Dave Swindell
Badges:
#5
Report 17 years ago
#5
In article <[email protected] sting.google.com>, M_RUDKY <[email protected]> writes
[q1]>Please tell me which ones are correct.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>1.I will go on this week. or I will go in this week[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
Neither. I will go this week.
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>2.I will hold a party at this weeken. or[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I will hold a party on this weeken.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
Neither. I will hold a party this weekend.
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>3. It was so popular in the 1980s[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>or[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>It was so popular in 1980s.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
The former is right.

And congratulations for *not* using an apostrophe in 1980s.

--
Dave [email protected] Remove my gerbil for email replies.

Bike's are bosh, PC's are pointless, and the 1990's are nuts! Bikes are great, PCs are super, and
the 1990s are the time to be! Save the apostrophe! Get 'em right! If in doubt, leave 'em out!!
0
Dave Swindell
Badges:
#6
Report 17 years ago
#6
In article <[email protected] sting.google.com>, M_RUDKY <[email protected]> writes
[q1]>Many thanks to all for your answers.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>however I still feel a bit confused with what Dave Swindell posted.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>> And congratulations for *not* using an apostrophe in 1980s.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>How about if I use : It's very popular in the 1980's.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Is it completely wrong? or Would it change to another meaning?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
My apologies for any confusion you felt. I certainly didn't want to confuse you, but many native
English speakers are already confused.

The use of 's in plurals of numbers and abbreviations is somewhat contentious. Some insist that it
is valid, and quote certain style guides in their support. However, these style guides invariably
simply state that "you will sometimes see ... " and do not put any value judgement on the
phenomenon.

The apostrophe already has well-established and universally accepted useage in the context of normal
words, and the use of 's for the plurals of numerals and abbreviations runs against this, and can
produce great confusion. So it is sensible to adopt the same conventions with numerals and
abbreviations as for normal words.

Some examples:-

"1980s fashions" - following the rules for nouns, this means the fashions of the decade of those
years beginning "198?". "1980s" is used as an adjective.

"1980's fashions" - following the rules for nouns, this is a possessive meaning "the fashions of the
year 1980".

If the 's is used for the plural, in place of the "1980s" in the first sentence above, you have lost
the ability to differentiate between the decade and the year. Look for instance at the following:-

"2002's fashions".

Nobody would interpret this as referring to anything but "the fashions of the year 2002", and the
notion that 's makes a plural out of the numeral 2002 creates a nonsensical statement, because 2002
is without doubt a thing that cannot represent anything but a single year.

Think also of how you would write the above statements in words:-

"Nineteen eighties fashions" - the decade from 1980 to 1989.

"Nineteen eighty's fashions" - the fashions of the year 1980. "Two thousand and two's fashions" -
the fashions of the year 2002.

It is sensible to carry these same conventions into phrases using numerals.

The same applies to abbreviations, but I'll keep to the numerals here (forgetting elision, and
possessive plurals %-), and again congratulate you on having got it right first time.

--
Dave [email protected] Remove my gerbil for email replies.

Bike's are bosh, PC's are pointless, and the 1990's are nuts! Bikes are great, PCs are super, and
the 1990s are the time to be! Save the apostrophe! Get 'em right! If in doubt, leave 'em out!!
0
M_rudky
Badges:
#7
Report 17 years ago
#7
Dear all,

I feel thankful to CyberCypher and Hananet for your answers.

[q2]> > 1.I will go on this week. or I will go in this week[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I'm afraid that these two choices make no sense, What are they talking about? They both lack a[/q1]
[q1]> context. Given the porper context, both could be correct.[/q1]

What I wanted to ask you was which reposition should precede the noun "week" in American English.

I know the preposition "on" is used before days of a week, for example: on Monday, on friday, The
"in" is put before months of a year, exp in july, in august, etc...

What preposition should I put before the "week"?

maybe "on the week" or "in the week"???? which one is correct in American English????

[q2]> > 3. It was so popular in the 1980s or It was so popular in 1980s.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> It has to be "It was so popular in the 1980s", but it would be better if the "so" were deleted.[/q1]

Please tell me why the "so" should be deleted in the above sentence.

May I change it to "It was very popular in the 1980s"?

P.S One more, I would like to make a small request to you all. In my posts, I often use some
structures which I am not sure are correct or not. So that, from now on, when reading my posts,
if you see anything gramnatically wrong , please point it out. I would appreciate.

Thanks in advance.

Regards,
0
M_rudky
Badges:
#8
Report 17 years ago
#8
Many thanks to all for your answers.

however I still feel a bit confused with what Dave Swindell posted.

[q1]> And congratulations for *not* using an apostrophe in 1980s.[/q1]

How about if I use : It's very popular in the 1980's.

Is it completely wrong? or Would it change to another meaning?

Please answer me. Thank you.

Rudky
0
Kristina Lim
Badges:
#9
Report 17 years ago
#9
"M_RUDKY" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> Dear all,[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I feel thankful to CyberCypher and Hananet for your answers.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q3]> > > 1.I will go on this week. or I will go in this week[/q3]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > I'm afraid that these two choices make no sense, What are they talking about? They both lack a[/q2]
[q2]> > context. Given the porper context, both could be correct.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> What I wanted to ask you was which reposition should precede the noun "week" in American English.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I know the preposition "on" is used before days of a week, for example: on Monday, on friday, The[/q1]
[q1]> "in" is put before months of a year, exp in july, in august, etc...[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> What preposition should I put before the "week"?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> maybe "on the week" or "in the week"???? which one is correct in American English????[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
"Within" is possible, but I prefer Einde's suggestion: "I will go this week."

[q3]> > > 3. It was so popular in the 1980s or It was so popular in 1980s.[/q3]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > It has to be "It was so popular in the 1980s", but it would be better if the "so" were deleted.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Please tell me why the "so" should be deleted in the above sentence.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
"So" is usually relative to some frame of reference. For example, you can use the form "so X that Y"
where Y is a reference point: "It was so popular in the 1980s that almost everyone tried it."

[q1]> May I change it to "It was very popular in the 1980s"?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
Yes.

[q1]> P.S One more, I would like to make a small request to you all. In my posts, I often use some[/q1]
[q1]> structures which I am not sure are correct or not. So that, from now on, when reading my[/q1]
[q1]> posts, if you see anything gramnatically wrong , please point it out. I would appreciate.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
"One more thing," "So, from now on," "I would appreciate it."

Kristina
0
Einde O'Callagh
Badges:
#10
Report 17 years ago
#10
M_RUDKY wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
<snip>
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> What preposition should I put before the "week"?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> maybe "on the week" or "in the week"???? which one is correct in American English????[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
If we are talking about the current week we don't use a preposition at all, i.e. "this week".
similarly we speak of "last week" (meaning the seven days up to last Saturday - or Friday for the
working week) and "next week" (meaning the seven days from next Sunday - or Monday for the
working week).

We use "in" in other contexts, e.g. "in the third week of June", "in the week starting 23 November"
etc. Also "in the last week" means "during the seven days up to now (or today)" and "in the next
week" means "during the seven days starting now (or today)".

I don't believe there are any differences between American and British usage here.

[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > It has to be "It was so popular in the 1980s", but it would be better if the "so" were deleted.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Please tell me why the "so" should be deleted in the above sentence.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
Without further context it seems superfluous. Some people use it in spoken English with a very
strong emphasis on the "so" - bere it means more or less the same as "very".

[q1]> May I change it to "It was very popular in the 1980s"?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
This is stylistically better in a situation without context.

[q1]> P.S One more, I would like to make a small request to you all. In my posts, I often use some[/q1]
[q1]> structures which I am not sure are correct or not. So that, from now on, when reading my[/q1]
[q1]> posts, if you see anything gramnatically wrong , please point it out. I would appreciate.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
"I would appreciate it."

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
0
Cybercypher
Badges:
#11
Report 17 years ago
#11
Einde O'Callaghan <[email protected]> burbled
news:[email protected]:

[q1]> CyberCypher wrote:[/q1]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> [email protected] (M_RUDKY) burbled news:[email protected]:[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> > Please tell me which ones are correct.[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > 1.I will go on this week. or I will go in this week[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> I'm afraid that these two choices make no sense, What are they talking about? They both lack a[/q2]
[q2]>> context. Given the porper context, both could be correct.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q1]> This depends on whether he is asking a question about prepositions and time phrases or not.[/q1]

And that is exactly what I meant about context.

[q1]> If it is about which preposition to use with "this week" after the verb "go" then neither is[/q1]
[q1]> correct; the correct sentence would be "I will go this week." If we are talking about the phrasal[/q1]
[q1]> verbs "go in" and "go on" then both would be correct[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>> > 2.I will hold a party at this weeken. or I will hold a party on this weeken.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> It depends on whether you're wirting/speaking British or American English. If it's American[/q2]
[q2]>> English, then it's neither of the above but "I will hold a party this weekend".[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q1]> This is also correct in British English. The difference between "at the weekend" (British) and "on[/q1]
[q1]> the weekend" (American) is usually concerned with habitual acticity or in sentences like the above[/q1]
[q1]> only with the determiner "the". So the sentence "I will hold a party at the weekend" is correct in[/q1]
[q1]> British English and means the same as "I will hold a party this weekend." I'm not certain whether[/q1]
[q1]> "I will hold a party on the weekend" is correct in American English.[/q1]

Actually, in AmE, it should be "I'm going to *have* a party this weekend".

--
Franke
0
Einde O'Callagh
Badges:
#12
Report 17 years ago
#12
CyberCypher wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Einde O'Callaghan <[email protected]> burbled[/q1]
[q1]> news:[email protected]:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
<snip>
[q2]> > So the sentence "I will hold a party at the weekend" is correct in British English and means the[/q2]
[q2]> > same as "I will hold a party this weekend." I'm not certain whether "I will hold a party on the[/q2]
[q2]> > weekend" is correct in American English.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Actually, in AmE, it should be "I'm going to *have* a party this weekend".[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
This is also the most idiomatic way of saying it in British English, too. "To hold a party" is very
formal and a bit old-fashioned.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Regarding Ofqual's most recent update, do you think you will be given a fair grade this summer?

Yes (209)
33.49%
No (415)
66.51%

Watched Threads

View All