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jrhartley
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#941
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#941
(Original post by kaji)
hmm nice work there jrhartley.. out of curiosity how well did you do in your 1st year as that work looks pretty nice =)

~kaji
i did ok, mid-high 2.1s for all modules other than a history one which i got a first for.
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Trojan
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#942
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#942
ace thanks jr hartley u are benevolent! and phyla in you i have a fellow lost soul.

does every1 think i should go ahead and apply? if yes can as many pple as possible type YEAH in comments below, because ive read through this forum, and i trust you pple, this is my career im putting in your hands!
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jrhartley
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#943
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#943
Hello

Just gotten back from spending a night at Le Couvent de la Tourette by Corbusier, one of the most interesting and complete buildings I've ever visited. The church is breath-taking - I'm not religious, but this space would make any atheist think twice. I attended the mass and it was extremely moving to hear the Benedictine monks chanting (the echos last 10 seconds within the chapel owing to its huge height). Photos / sketches here:

http://ralphs-photos.fotopic.net/c1076154.html
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Quiller
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#944
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#944
(Original post by Trojan)
does every1 think I should go ahead and apply? if yes can as many pple as possible type YEAH in comments below, because ive read through this forum, and i trust you pple, this is my career im putting in your hands!
ahhhh don’t do this to us. I’m not going to say anything either way. I'm going to leave you to make your own mind up here. Architects are free and independent thinkers... that starts here with asking yourself whether you want to study the course or not

Sorry I can’t be of more help.

(Original post by jrhartley)
Just gotten back from spending a night at Le Couvent de la Tourette by Corbusier, one of the most interesting and complete buildings I've ever visited. The church is breath-taking - I'm not religious, but this space would make any atheist think twice. I attended the mass and it was extremely moving to hear the Benedictine monks chanting (the echos last 10 seconds within the chapel owing to its huge height).
What a fantastic concept, very rarely do you get to spend 24 hours within a building (ignoring deadline times in the studio) and rarer still one that continues to fulfil its purpose like Le Couvent de la Tourette. I had a look at your photographs and sketches and I think you're spot on when you say it’s a complete piece of architecture, I got the impression this was so because the building seemed to conform to the three vows that are observed by the monks! Poverty (simplicity), obedience (taming and direction of light) and chastity (pure forms). I am now a BIG fan of the light canons and the panoramic shots you took of the interior and exterior of the church are really effective photos, which lens do you use because you had a really good variety of close shots and more landscape views in that set? Thanks for introducing me to that gem !
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Quiller
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#945
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#945
Also, before I forget, if you have a spare moment have a look at this artist (peter callesen). Not strictly architecture, but still very interesting all the same.

click here

well I found it really interesting....
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jrhartley
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#946
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#946
(Original post by Quiller)
What a fantastic concept, very rarely do you get to spend 24 hours within a building....which lens do you use because you had a really good variety of close shots and more landscape views
Absolutely - Weston (who'll you'll have for Arch since 1940 module in a month's time) told me it was really important to stay overnight - he was spot on, I was the only guest (other than the guide and the friars) and it is so liberating to be able to wander around a building as if its your own, see the light change throughout the day, understand how it works as a building. It also gives you time to look, work out what you want to sketch - the trouble with a lot of field trips is that you have 30 mins in each building, so its hard to work out what's really going on. La Tourette was a building that I hadn't really appreciated until I got inside it - from the exterior it doesn't look all that, but obviously, as you point out, its a building designed (rightly) around its occupants. Great example of LC's 5 points of architecture.

I use a Nikon D70 with a 18-70 lens. I have a zoom lens too, but I rarely use it - what I tend to do is take lots of photos with the 18-70 and combine them using the photomerge function in Photoshop to get wide angle shots (a 10mm fisheye would be lovely, but mega bucks to buy). Photomerge isn't obviously as good as a super-wide angle, but you get the idea of the spaces better using it. cheers for the comments, willl have a look at that link in a bit.
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Trojan
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#947
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#947
ahh quiller i know i know- i just want a more community feel uknow! but it didnt work... i guess this is a more serious forum i mean the specs some pple are giving for equipment are pretty specific, but i am only a little 17 year old. thanks for replying though, or the feeling of rejection would gt to me
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Trojan
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#948
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#948
also peter callesen is great. i wonder how he can make such precise images through cutting paper
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pixie_dusta
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#949
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#949
Hello! How are you guys? I haven't been on since the beginning of summer!

Congratulations to all the people that got in their chosen university to atudy architecture! ^_^.. hopefully that will happen to me this year

I am currently doing my personal statement... and I was just wondering if you could give me any tips about things to add.

Thanks alot! Your help is greatly appreciated
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larchitecturel
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#950
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#950
All i can say is keep on trying to improve it, draft after draft after draft.
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Quiller
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#951
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#951
(Original post by Trojan)
i guess this is a more serious forum i mean the specs some pple are giving for equipment are pretty specific...
Naaaaah, from what I can gather this isnt a serious forum at all. Dont get fazed by equipment specifications, im just looking to buy a new lens so thats why i asked. Don't worry, you'll learn a lot in a year.

(Original post by Trojan)
also peter callesen is great. i wonder how he can make such precise images through cutting paper
A lot of work with an Xacto knife and a cutting mat i presume, coupled with his 'black belts guide to origami' book by his side and his mad folding 'skillz'. (he probably hires people to cut them for him i should imagine) A lot of thought obviously goes into their construction though. My particular favourite is the humming bird and the flower, also the bird cage and the skeleton on the chair looking down at the shadow of a man.

The guy is obviously a complete fruitcake though, his performance of his 'The Dying Swan, 1998' is hilarious (click on perfomances, then middle bottom picture). I cannot fathom how the people watching don't burst out laughing at a man in a 'homemade ugly duckling' suit painting himself and trying to perform ballet... FOR 25 MINUTES.
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Trojan
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#952
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#952
haha i didnt even look at the videos until then- maybe he is serious or maybe he will be one of those artists who on their death beds claim 'fooled yea, a performance artist-Me!' but at least it is funny and abit refreshing from them majority of serious performance stuff.. and a xacto knife- they sound great i better get one of those.

yeah he must be talented with the paper, but i think some of the simpler ones work just as well or even better, like the man holding the other man from falling and they look like they are floating, its reminds me of peter pan.
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Quiller
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#953
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#953
Yeah, Peter Callesen seems like a genuine sort of guy, who tries to express different ideas in unorthodox ways. Like that big paper boat he made, or the polystyrene castle. I like his work lots.

All you 2nd years in 6th form at the moment will be applying for university soon! I don't envy you, jumping through the hoops for ucas drove me mad... you might enjoy it though. (if thats even possible)
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LizH
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#954
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#954
I Can See The Pineapple Building From My Bedroom At Beaumont!!!!!!!!!
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Jeck
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#955
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#955
Hi Guys!

I was on here last summer and haven't been back since - I totally forgot about this site!

Anyway, I going back to uni on wednesday to start my second year (studio doesn't start until next week but we register on friday). I'm studying Architecture (k100) at University of Manchester.

I'm excited about going back especially since we are going to Barcelona from 8th-14th October, our whole first semester project is based there. We went to Amsterdam in Febuary for our second semester first year project and that was fun, but the architecture in Barcelona is much better so i'm hoping it's gonna be really good.

Anyway, I wanted to ask if anyone has had any experience with ArchiCad or has at least heard of/about it? A family member has just given me 6 discs and 10 books that her company had bought (but no longer require) and I really want to be able to use them in my projects this year but i've only used AutoCad a few times and i'm not that good at it. I don't want to spend ages "playing around" with it, because time is "precious" on my course with deadlines every week and I don't want to waste any if the results aren't worth it.

Thanks

o yeah, please feel free to ask me anything about my course or university if your interested.

I took maths, physics and geography at A-level if that helps! I applied to Manchester (obviously!), UCL, Nottingham, Liverpool, Sheffield, Newcastle and I got accepted to all of them. I took a gap year to travel around Europe and US.
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adpowis1
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#956
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#956
(Original post by Jeck)
I wanted to ask if anyone has had any experience with ArchiCad or has at least heard of/about it?
I've heard of it - I got the impression that it's fairly popular with Mac users. I'm sure I'll be trying to use it when I get to that stage (haven't yet) as Graphisoft are now giving the full application away to all students, which I think is AMAZING and every company should do (long-shot).

Have a look at http://www.apple.com/uk/education/so.../archicad.html

- Anthony
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phyla
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#957
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#957
(Original post by Jeck)
o yeah, please feel free to ask me anything about my course or university if your interested.

I took maths, physics and geography at A-level if that helps! I applied to Manchester (obviously!), UCL, Nottingham, Liverpool, Sheffield, Newcastle and I got accepted to all of them. I took a gap year to travel around Europe and US.
I know it's the obvious question, but do you have any advice for personal statements/interviews? Did you find it a disadvantage that you didn't have art as one of your A-Levels?

Thanks!
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Jeck
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#958
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Well, the only place that asked me for an interview was Manchester. I just took along some of my work from GCSE Art (I got an A) and GCSE Graphics (also got an A) but mostly work I had done for AS level art (I completed the first year but then dropped it) and also a few things I had done during my gap year (photo's from my travels mostly). They sent me a really good list of stuff they suggested I bring, so I just took 1 or 2 examples of each (paintings, sketches, pastels, photos of buildings, photos of models I had made, basically just the best stuff I had done is each different meduim over the last 4 years). The interview was mostly just a chance for them to see my work, with a few questions to check your really committed and have a general interest. We mostly talked about my work and what architecture I like, what I had been doing during my gap year etc. It was more like a casual converstion than a formal interview. The lady who interviewed me was really interested in my work (she studied every piece for ages and asked me lots of questions about each one) and seemed quite impressed, I think that's what got me accepted.

I think most uni's really like it if you have done work experience in an architects office or "shadowed" an architect because it shows that you know what work is envolved and your still serious about making it your career. So talk about your work experience with lots of enthusiasum (how much you enjoyed it, how it confirmed your decision to study architecture etc.) in your personal statement and/or interview.

I don't think not doing art at A level is a disadvantage, the people on my course have such a variety of A levels with probably around half having done art. I think a lot of people will have at least done art at GCSE though. If not (or if your grade wasn't that good) then your more likely to get interviews I think. As long as you have some good pieces of work to show at interviews, then they will see whether you have enough "artisic ability" for the course or not.
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hopper4
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#959
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#959
anyone got any helpful advice with regards to digitals cameras? im going into my first year of a degree in architecture and would like to know how much i should be prepared to spend on one. also, if possible, the more detailed specs required (megapixels, zoom, memory etc).
thanks, hopper4
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hopper4
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#960
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#960
(Original post by jrhartley)
um - well its not out of the question, but if you're thinking you want to go into the city, an architecture degree is probably not the most intuitive choice - you might as well go for economics with maths to improve your chances. there's not a huge amount of overlap between an architecture degree and trading - in fact, anyone with an interest in the trading side of investment banking probably wouldn't find an architecture degree that interesting, and vice versa - an architect probably wouldn't want to be a trader. i used to work in finance (but not as a trader). if you want to be a trader, bearing in mind the competition, you probably should look at doing economics / maths. just my opinion, its always hard to know what h.r. want these days.
thank you very much for your response firstly - very helpful info. you said the trading side might be a bit far-fetched; i presume there must be many other branches to work in within the finance sector. with a degree from cambridge (especially architecture: one of the most competitive to get into/ work-demanding/intellectually stimulating), i've heard that it is virtually possible to study in the city with a degree in english, history or even medicine. does this not prove that it's the way they teach you to think as apposed to what you think? apoligies if this sounds controversial; i'm very interested in your opinion. thanks again, hopper4
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