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need help with finishing my extended essay (formal queries only) watch

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    I) I have a picture (of butterflies) on my front page, do I have to explain the choice of picture in an appendix or something or can I leave it as it is? It is self-explanatory, but IBO are so God damn square-minded. But then again it says in the guidelines that moderators are not required to read appendixes...

    II) Should the table of contents include the table of contents? Or the front page? Where do I start with naming the page "1"? The table of contents? The abstract? The introduction?

    III) In a 4000 word essay, what (how many), in your opinion, is an excessive use of footnotes?

    IV) When citing sources in footnotes, and you are repeating the same source as the last footnote, is it ok to use "Ibid" or should you always say the full source? When you are referring to a book listed in the bibliography is it OK to just say the name of the book and page(s)? Or should I use full reference there as well? Or should simply all works used as references in footnotes be included in the bibliography?

    Thank you!
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    (Original post by Linda)
    I) I have a picture (of butterflies) on my front page, do I have to explain the choice of picture in an appendix or something or can I leave it as it is? It is self-explanatory, but IBO are so God damn square-minded. But then again it says in the guidelines that moderators are not required to read appendixes...

    II) Should the table of contents include the table of contents? Or the front page? Where do I start with naming the page "1"? The table of contents? The abstract? The introduction?

    III) In a 4000 word essay, what (how many), in your opinion, is an excessive use of footnotes?

    IV) When citing sources in footnotes, and you are repeating the same source as the last footnote, is it ok to use "Ibid" or should you always say the full source? When you are referring to a book listed in the bibliography is it OK to just say the name of the book and page(s)? Or should I use full reference there as well? Or should simply all works used as references in footnotes be included in the bibliography?

    Thank you!
    1) You don't have to explain your title page.
    2) I put my page 1 from the introduction...I think...haha...I handed my ext. essay in october so I don't remember (we were required to)
    3) A lot of references are always excellent, but having half a page of footnotes certainly is unattractive.
    4) 'ibid' is ok to use when it's the same source as before. What I did to reference was...hmm for example I wrote:

    'the textbook problem is bla bla bla (Nishio, 2001:26) '<--- author, year of publication, and page number. Then you don't have to put footnotes for references. This tells the examiner to refer to the bibliography.

    This type of referencing info is from my dad who's a university professor and written a couple of books so you can call it reliable, haha. My supervisor said it was ok too.

    Hope this helps!!!
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    Thanks!

    btw does anyone know of a god synonym for verisimilitude?
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    (Original post by Linda)
    Thanks!

    btw does anyone know of a god synonym for verisimilitude?
    realism, authenticity.
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    (Original post by vavavoom)
    realism, authenticity.
    Hmmm... I mean something like a "false" sense of reality.... "Realism", with quotes, yeah, that's it, thanks again
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    (Original post by Linda)
    Hmmm... I mean something like a "false" sense of reality.... "Realism", with quotes, yeah, that's it, thanks again
    Are you writing about a book? 'Verisimilitude' was my buzz word in my English essays a few years ago, lol.
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    (Original post by vavavoom)
    Are you writing about a book? 'Verisimilitude' was my buzz word in my English essays a few years ago, lol.
    I am indeed. "Language in Lolita - Nabokov's way of seducing the reader" to be exact.

    Is there such a thing as apparent verisimilitude? The appearance of the appearance of something real? <-LOL
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    (Original post by Linda)
    I am indeed. "Language in Lolita - Nabokov's way of seducing the reader" to be exact.

    Is there such a thing as apparent verisimilitude? The appearance of the appearance of something real? <-LOL
    Haha, hmmm still trying to work the last sentence out......haha. What do you mean? So something looks real? How do you want to use the word in the sentence? I used 'versimilitude' in things like 'geographical versimilitude in the book' etc. So do you want to use 'apparent verismilitude' in a sentence like 'The apparent verisilimilitude in this depiction is salient'? Sorry thoughts buzzing around in my head.....

    1)do mot need to refer to picture on front page-if only for presentation purposes.

    2)No table of contents should include a table of contents
    start at the abstract

    3)no more than 4 footnotes per page.

    4)use a different number for each source
    eg butterflies.......1


    1. C. Jones.

    Only full reference should be made in bibliography.
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    Earlier in the essay I wrote this:
    Everything in between seems to be coloured by Lolita as well. The town where he remembers Lolita dressed in white from top to toe he renames “Snow”, in “Champion” he had envisioned Lolita at Wimbledon, a tennis player coached by him. This, and many other small recollections of their trip through America, “Insomnia Lodge” where he could not sleep, “Elphinstone” (the end, a juncture, milestone?), where he first saw Lolita lying on the lawn, and where her mother where coincidentally killed when rammed by a car, immortalized as “Lawnstreet, Ramsdale”, adds to the artifice of the book, the interlacing of verbal inventions such as these undermines all that gives verisimilitude to the narrative.

    This is the paragraph that I am working on:

    Another contributor to the game-setting of the book is the texts-within-the-text, as I have mentioned earlier. The dubious forword sets the frame of the book, or more likely, sets out the first snare for the reader to be trapped in. The ingenuity of Nabokov lies in the appearance of verisimilitude (!) The forword informs us that the story we are about to read is real, but in reality we have indeed begun the story, perhaps without realising it. The second trap is believing the author of the forword’s intention. He points out that the story should be viewed as a moral awakener - quite the contrary to Nabokov's hatred of satire, who claims that "Lolita" is by no means a lesson in ethics. John Ray junior is after all a creation of Nabokov, whose initials (J.R. jr.) alarmingly echoes the voice of Humbert Humbert himself (...)

    This is for English B by the way...
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    (Original post by Linda)
    Earlier in the essay I wrote this:
    Everything in between seems to be coloured by Lolita as well. The town where he remembers Lolita dressed in white from top to toe he renames “Snow”, in “Champion” he had envisioned Lolita at Wimbledon, a tennis player coached by him. This, and many other small recollections of their trip through America, “Insomnia Lodge” where he could not sleep, “Elphinstone” (the end, a juncture, milestone?), where he first saw Lolita lying on the lawn, and where her mother where coincidentally killed when rammed by a car, immortalized as “Lawnstreet, Ramsdale”, adds to the artifice of the book, the interlacing of verbal inventions such as these undermines all that gives verisimilitude to the narrative.

    This is the paragraph that I am working on:

    Another contributor to the game-setting of the book is the texts-within-the-text, as I have mentioned earlier. The dubious forword sets the frame of the book, or more likely, sets out the first snare for the reader to be trapped in. The ingenuity of Nabokov lies in the appearance of verisimilitude (!) The forword informs us that the story we are about to read is real, but in reality we have indeed begun the story, perhaps without realising it. The second trap is believing the author of the forword’s intention. He points out that the story should be viewed as a moral awakener - quite the contrary to Nabokov's hatred of satire, who claims that "Lolita" is by no means a lesson in ethics. John Ray junior is after all a creation of Nabokov, whose initials (J.R. jr.) alarmingly echoes the voice of Humbert Humbert himself (...)

    This is for English B by the way...
    I see. Hehe, my World Lit is on the verisimilitude created by documents in Black Rain so I think I can help. In this case you don't need to say 'appearance of verisimlitude'. You can just say, 'The ingenuity of Nabokov lies in the way in which he creates a sense of verisimilitude', and by doing that you automatically make it mean 'realism' (<--with the quotes).
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    (Original post by vavavoom)
    I see. Hehe, my World Lit is on the verisimilitude created by documents in Black Rain so I think I can help. In this case you don't need to say 'appearance of verisimlitude'. You can just say, 'The ingenuity of Nabokov lies in the way in which he creates a sense of verisimilitude', and by doing that you automatically make it mean 'realism' (<--with the quotes).
    hehe, thanks - I called the book a parody of realism somewhere in my essay as well... And a parody of comedy...

    How would you classify Lolita?
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    (Original post by Linda)
    hehe, thanks - I called the book a parody of realism somewhere in my essay as well... And a parody of comedy...

    How would you classify Lolita?
    I haven't read Lolita, sorry.
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    (Original post by vavavoom)
    I haven't read Lolita, sorry.
    You should, it's great
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    (Original post by Linda)
    You should, it's great
    Ok I will, lol
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    Is this sentence clear to you:

    He later adds: “But in my arms she was always Lolita.” This distinction, between Lolita and Dolores, alerts us the danger of losing ourselves in the labyrinth of Humbert’s language, from first word to last, from “Lolita” to “Lolita”.

    My mom didn't get the from lolita to lolita part... I mean that the first and last word is Lolita, i thought it was obvious, maybe not...
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    (Original post by Linda)
    Is this sentence clear to you:

    He later adds: “But in my arms she was always Lolita.” This distinction, between Lolita and Dolores, alerts us the danger of losing ourselves in the labyrinth of Humbert’s language, from first word to last, from “Lolita” to “Lolita”.

    My mom didn't get the from lolita to lolita part... I mean that the first and last word is Lolita, i thought it was obvious, maybe not...
    Ooo, I didn't get the 'lolita to lolita' part at first either.
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    (Original post by vavavoom)
    Ooo, I didn't get the 'lolita to lolita' part at first either.
    grrr... do you think the examinors will get it or should I change it?
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    (Original post by Linda)
    grrr... do you think the examinors will get it or should I change it?
    hmmm not sure...
 
 
 
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