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    Hey all...I am really really really upset. I had a practice interview today for my next weeks interview at Pembroke...it was awful. It was my first and will be my only practice at it, as my former history teacher suggested i have a practice.

    From the word go, i could not decide what i thought and was unable to formulate my arguments properly. I went off at a tangent, i was just plain crap.

    The funny thing is, i used to be really good at this sort of thing, but i spose i have been out of practice (that was what my teacher suggested anyhow).

    Anyways, have any of you historians experienced the same in your practice interviews and any advice that could rectify my performance before it is too late (is it too late)?
    Many thanks-
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    Well, I have had a practice interview for Law...I suspose there is a couple of things you could do:
    A) If you have not covered the material they are talking about, say so and maybe they will move onto another Q or coach you through it?
    B) If you are not sure of what is required, probe the interviewer i.e ask for examples or say could you clarify that
    C) Before the interview, I would do loads of reading on periods of history that really interest you...then you should be able to construct better arguments and steer the conversation towards those areas

    Anyway, remember it is not a bad thing to ask questions....according to me form teacher (who has 2 degrees from Oxford) everybody feels like they have done crap when they come out of an interview, so maybe it is normal. The best thing to do is chill
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    (Original post by Blamps)
    Well, I have had a practice interview for Law...I suspose there is a couple of things you could do:
    A) If you have not covered the material they are talking about, say so and maybe they will move onto another Q or coach you through it?
    B) If you are not sure of what is required, probe the interviewer i.e ask for examples or say could you clarify that
    C) Before the interview, I would do loads of reading on periods of history that really interest you...then you should be able to construct better arguments and steer the conversation towards those areas

    Anyway, remember it is not a bad thing to ask questions....according to me form teacher (who has 2 degrees from Oxford) everybody feels like they have done crap when they come out of an interview, so maybe it is normal. The best thing to do is chill
    I am sorry if that is no help but, I tried
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    I think interview performance really can vary widely. Last week I had two practice interviews, the first went awfully as I was long winded, lacked clarity and had trouble formulating my arguments. I then had another with a little under an hour later and I was of fire (lol). The only conscious change I made was to take a few seconds to reflect before answering each question and to take extra care on my articulation. This meant I was far more concentrated, relaxed and started to enjoy the interview. As a result, I performed much much better. I wouldn’t worry about one practice interview, you’ll knock their socks off on Wednesday xthup
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    (Original post by aliel)
    Hey all...I am really really really upset. I had a practice interview today for my next weeks interview at Pembroke...it was awful. It was my first and will be my only practice at it, as my former history teacher suggested i have a practice.

    From the word go, i could not decide what i thought and was unable to formulate my arguments properly. I went off at a tangent, i was just plain crap.

    The funny thing is, i used to be really good at this sort of thing, but i spose i have been out of practice (that was what my teacher suggested anyhow).

    Anyways, have any of you historians experienced the same in your practice interviews and any advice that could rectify my performance before it is too late (is it too late)?
    Many thanks-
    If you do have a real problem with nerves, it may be possible to phone up the college and special arrangements may be made i.e they may spend longer talking to you but not necssarily in an overly intense way...I know that may sound stupid, but a longer interview such as that would give the interviewer the best chance to assess you...even if only half of the interview went well, it may be better than a short interview where say 2/3rds went well...I can't remember where I heard/read this but, it is an option I suspose
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    Thanks you guys. I was just shocked how crap i was. It could just be nerves i suppose, but i will take into consideration all of your suggestions. Thanks xxxxx
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    (Original post by aliel)
    Hey all...I am really really really upset. I had a practice interview today for my next weeks interview at Pembroke...it was awful. It was my first and will be my only practice at it, as my former history teacher suggested i have a practice.

    From the word go, i could not decide what i thought and was unable to formulate my arguments properly. I went off at a tangent, i was just plain crap.

    The funny thing is, i used to be really good at this sort of thing, but i spose i have been out of practice (that was what my teacher suggested anyhow).

    Anyways, have any of you historians experienced the same in your practice interviews and any advice that could rectify my performance before it is too late (is it too late)?
    Many thanks-
    I had the same feeling after my first practice interview, which was given to me by a history student at Cambridge. It was quite challenging and I thought that I did quite badly, but he said I did ok. My second one was with my history teacher, who said that they might throw a "lifeline" and that it was important to catch it if they do. I'd say, read about your favourite topics, try to take control of the conversation (I'm told they like that) so that it goes where you want it to go. Try to be short and concise (I always woffle too much).

    Also, don't forget that there is an administrative interview as well, and the obvious basics (good handshake, sit properly etc). You'll be fine. Show 'em what you got!!! Good luck!
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    You'll be fine, just remember if in trouble don't say there is no such thing as historical truth and don't start spouting feminist history statements at a right wing Cambridge don!
    Let me know how it goes
    xxx
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    If you have no idea what they're talking about, then say you havent't studied that, then immediately steer the conversation to a topic you have studied.
 
 
 
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