Regional Variation in English Watch

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Beekeeper
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#1
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Okay i'm sure you will all find this reaaaaally boring *hopes you don't though*, but could people on tsr from different parts of the country name a distinct local pronunciation, or weird terms you use, that perhaps you don't find in other parts of the UK?
I'm doing some revision and i'd like to throw a few examples in so it looks like i've properly researched it
Could you name the term/pronunciation, and where you live, and then post it here pleasy...

I'll start us off:
"Beer-off" used in East Yorkshire to mean "Off-license"
Glottaling in articles, Eg. "I'm going t' shop" used in parts of Yorkshire
"bruva" used in East London to mean "brother"
"fink" instead of "think" in the SE
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Debussy
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glottaling means saying bockle instead of bottle... and its called a glottal stop.

i hope you are revising :p:
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Beekeeper
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(Original post by medic_bex)
glottaling means saying bockle instead of bottle... and its called a glottal stop.
lol, no it doesn't :eek:

I think you're trying to refer to /t/ glottaling?
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Butterfly
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'fink' instead of think etc. ... general south east area
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Beekeeper
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(Original post by Butterfly)
'fink' instead of think etc. ... general south east area
Ooh yes forgot about that!

Heres an interesting link:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/3531075.stm
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Debussy
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(Original post by beekeeper_)
lol, no it doesn't :eek:

I think you're trying to refer to /t/ glottaling?
well.. my a-level in language says it is... but maybe its just regional variation... :p:
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kalibantre
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no fink is up in the north west too..

"la/r" to mean.. a word you put in anywhere in a sentence to annoy people that can speak properly - from Liverpool.

D's in stead of th. again to annoy people. eg "dey do do dont de do" means "they though, dont they though." again liverpool.
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Gwen
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this probably won't help you at all, but oh well:

in canada, we say route as "root"
in america they say it as "rowt"
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Person
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Bockle!!! It's when someone says 'Bo'l e.g. without pronouncing a T.

Geordie

Toilet - Netty

Get lost - Hadaway

I'm not sure - Ah divint knaa leyk

I'm going down the lane - Ah'm gannin doon the lonnen

Instead of saying 'me' we sometimes say 'us.' 'Like Give us (usually pronounced uz/iz) a lift.'

Yes = Aye
No (affirmative reply) = Na
No (no way, no chance) = Nee
No - (less affirmative) = Nar
Nice - Canny
Quite (a lot) - Canny
Careful - Canny
Be careful/go carefully/take care = Gan canny
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Jamieeeee
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lol really? damn im goin to newc uni... thats gona get confusing
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silver~planet
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#11
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In somerset ppl put "to" on the end of some sentences... eg, where are you going to?
Also, things are called "he" or "they"... eg, can you pass me they buckets? where's he (ie, the bucket) to?
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Xanthe
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I know loads...here's one though:

It's all gone Pete Tong means 'it's all gone pear-shaped'.
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Random.Girl
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For Black Country and Brummie, bus = buzz
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Beekeeper
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(Original post by Northumbrian)
Bockle!!! It's when someone says 'Bo'l e.g. without pronouncing a T.

Geordie

Toilet - Netty

Get lost - Hadaway

I'm not sure - Ah divint knaa leyk

I'm going down the lane - Ah'm gannin doon the lonnen

Instead of saying 'me' we sometimes say 'us.' 'Like Give us (usually pronounced uz/iz) a lift.'

Yes = Aye
No (affirmative reply) = Na
No (no way, no chance) = Nee
No - (less affirmative) = Nar
Nice - Canny
Quite (a lot) - Canny
Careful - Canny
Be careful/go carefully/take care = Gan canny
Thanks

hmm, some guys down here say "aye" aswell...
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kate86
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Maybe this is a Yorkshire thing.
When further down south people dont get me when I say owt (anything) or nowt (nothing). Seems to draw some confused looks.
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HearTheThunder
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Oh just replace all Y's with 'Eh' and miss out the occaisonal letter and you'll have my local dialect... I hate it, I try to have an as neutral accent as possible (end up sounding like a newsreader)
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Alchemy
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In Sunderland instead of saying "Southerner" we say "scum"

We have an affinity for putting like at the end of sentances.

A Chav in sunderland is typically known as a Charver instead.
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SamTheMan
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In the West Midlands, in the Black Country:

"ar" instead of yes and "Ow bist?" instead of How are you?
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blissy
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#19
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People from Yorkshire sound sexy
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Daveo
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#20
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(Original post by blissy)
People from Yorkshire sound sexy
oh do they now?
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