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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    Oh JC, my mum used to have a Marina. The threat of having to leave their wedding in it had my dad up all night most of the week getting the Esprit back on the road!
    Mine arrived today.
    Frankly, I don't blame your dad - I wouldn't want to use it as a wedding car either! I do quite like it though. I reccon it'll only take me a couple of weekends to get it MOT worthy and only that long because I've got other cars that need maintainence too.
    It's only a couple of inches bigger than an MGB, but it feels massive inside in comparison.
    This is the items I've found so far that need attention before I can put it in for a test:

    1. Time engine and set up carb. (running massively rich and idle is far too high)
    2. Horn.
    3. Hazard lights.
    4. Wiper blades x2
    5. Check wiper motor and washers function. - I daren't try the motor yet the blades are so old they just crumbled!
    6. Grease suspension

    The PO changed all the fluids and fitted a new clutch at christmas so there's not an awful lot for me to do??

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    Do you know how to balance triple SU carbs, Jon?
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    This thread got me randomly looking at some old cars and I can see why JC has suggested in the past to get a classic car for cheaper insurance.

    Had a look on a comparison site at a 1975 VAUXHALL VICTOR 2300 S BLUE thats a 2.3L engine for people who want a bigger engine than tiny hatchbacks and it gave me a quote of £2000 which about the same as many hatchbacks for young drivers, and on a classic car policy I'm guessing it would be cheaper.

    Plus none of your friends will have one

    according to http://howmanyleft.co.uk there are only 9 Vauxhall Victors in the UK.

    It's not a bad idea.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Do you know how to balance triple SU carbs, Jon?
    - Switch on your gas tester and let it calibrate itself. Gas tester should then be adjusted to read 2% CO in the open air.
    - Air filters off
    - Top up dashpots
    - Slacken choke and throttle linkages
    - Wind the mixture screw in until the top of the jet is flush with the bridge and then back off 2 1/2 complete turnsturns.
    - Tap the dashpost with the handle of your screwdriver to re-centre the jets.
    - Start the car.
    - Allow it to warm up a little.
    - Insert an air flow meter into the trumpet of each carb and make a note of the reading
    - Adjust the throttle stops on each carb until the air flow meter gives the same reading from all three carbs.
    - Insert probe of gas tester up the exhaust.
    - Make a note of the reading.
    - Turn the mixture screw on the side of the carb by the same number of flats for each carb. I think it's anti clockwise to richen on HIF and clockwise on HS but check your manual.
    - Keep adjusting all three by equal amounts until your CO reading is around 3.5%
    - Check your idle speed - chances are it'll be too fast.
    - Adjust the throttle stops until your idle speed is around 900 rpm and they all still give the same reading on the air flow meter.
    - Check your gas tester reading again.
    At this point you need to tweak the throttle stops and mixture screws by equal amounts until you get the car idleing @ 900rpm AND your CO reading is a gnats whisker under 3.5%

    Obviously, before you go anywhere near the carbs you will have checked and set your plug gap, points gap and timing - 90% of carb problems are electrical.

    Every time you touch the mixture screws you should tap the dashpot with the handle of your screwdriver and open the throttle a fraction on the individual carb that you have adjusted - only a couple of hundred RPM is neccesary. Rev the engne too high and you'll blow the diaphragm in the gas tester and knacker it permenently. The purpose of this is to re-centres the jets and therefore give you a true reading on the gas tester.

    If you've set it up right, when you come off the throttle on a test drive you should get a nice little pop through the exhaust on the over run.

    -JC.
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    (Original post by Arron17)
    This thread got me randomly looking at some old cars and I can see why JC has suggested in the past to get a classic car for cheaper insurance.

    Had a look on a comparison site at a 1975 VAUXHALL VICTOR 2300 S BLUE thats a 2.3L engine for people who want a bigger engine than tiny hatchbacks and it gave me a quote of £2000 which about the same as many hatchbacks for young drivers, and on a classic car policy I'm guessing it would be cheaper.

    Plus none of your friends will have one

    according to http://howmanyleft.co.uk there are only 9 Vauxhall Victors in the UK.

    It's not a bad idea.
    You don't build up on NCBs though with a classic car premium.

    As for buying classics, for economy purposes it is best to stick with something that is easy to get parts for.... else what you save on insurance will be all but gone on sourcing for parts.
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    (Original post by Herr)
    You don't build up on NCBs though with a classic car premium.
    Oh, don't you...

    I wouldn't get a classic car anyway at the moment. I don't know enough about cars to be able to tweak and fix them when they go a bit wrong.

    But when I learn more there are some really nice old cars around.
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    (Original post by Arron17)
    This thread got me randomly looking at some old cars and I can see why JC has suggested in the past to get a classic car for cheaper insurance.

    Had a look on a comparison site at a 1975 VAUXHALL VICTOR 2300 S BLUE thats a 2.3L engine for people who want a bigger engine than tiny hatchbacks and it gave me a quote of £2000 which about the same as many hatchbacks for young drivers, and on a classic car policy I'm guessing it would be cheaper.

    Plus none of your friends will have one

    according to http://howmanyleft.co.uk there are only 9 Vauxhall Victors in the UK.

    It's not a bad idea.
    To be fair though, the 2.3l engine in the Victor produces ~115bhp when new so after 37 years it's not going to have as much oomph as most tiny hatchbacks e.g. the Fiat 500 Twinair, especially if you look at power to weight. If you look at it that way then it's not surprising they're cheap to insure for a 2.3l...

    Oh and then there's the questionable level of crash worthiness... Don't get me wrong, classic cars are great but they aren't really the right thing for young motorists or people who are concerned about safety.

    In other news: I also despair at the lack of interesting motoring related threads on here, there could at least be threads about car shows or various forms of racing etc. rather than the thousands of learner threads...
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    Der Trabant 601 ist der besser Auto.
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    (Original post by iwantcheese5)
    To be fair though, the 2.3l engine in the Victor produces ~115bhp when new so after 37 years it's not going to have as much oomph as most tiny hatchbacks e.g. the Fiat 500 Twinair, especially if you look at power to weight. If you look at it that way then it's not surprising they're cheap to insure for a 2.3l...

    Oh and then there's the questionable level of crash worthiness... Don't get me wrong, classic cars are great but they aren't really the right thing for young motorists or people who are concerned about safety.

    In other news: I also despair at the lack of interesting motoring related threads on here, there could at least be threads about car shows or various forms of racing etc. rather than the thousands of learner threads...
    Yeh, I get your point. It was aimed at the majority of people on here who seem to assume a bigger engine means the car goes faster. And as for crash safety I myself would recommend a modern car because I put a Ford Focus backwards through a wall and onto it's roof at about 40mph, scary as hell but I came out without a scratch, shows how well built modern cars are.
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    (Original post by Arron17)
    Oh, don't you...

    I wouldn't get a classic car anyway at the moment. I don't know enough about cars to be able to tweak and fix them when they go a bit wrong.

    But when I learn more there are some really nice old cars around.
    I didn't know hardly anything when I got my first car @ 16.
    You learn by doing things.
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    (Original post by JC.)
    - Switch on your gas tester and let it calibrate itself. Gas tester should then be adjusted to read 2% CO in the open air.
    - Air filters off
    - Top up dashpots
    - Slacken choke and throttle linkages
    - Wind the mixture screw in until the top of the jet is flush with the bridge and then back off 2 1/2 complete turnsturns.
    - Tap the dashpost with the handle of your screwdriver to re-centre the jets.
    - Start the car.
    - Allow it to warm up a little.
    - Insert an air flow meter into the trumpet of each carb and make a note of the reading
    - Adjust the throttle stops on each carb until the air flow meter gives the same reading from all three carbs.
    - Insert probe of gas tester up the exhaust.
    - Make a note of the reading.
    - Turn the mixture screw on the side of the carb by the same number of flats for each carb. I think it's anti clockwise to richen on HIF and clockwise on HS but check your manual.
    - Keep adjusting all three by equal amounts until your CO reading is around 3.5%
    - Check your idle speed - chances are it'll be too fast.
    - Adjust the throttle stops until your idle speed is around 900 rpm and they all still give the same reading on the air flow meter.
    - Check your gas tester reading again.
    At this point you need to tweak the throttle stops and mixture screws by equal amounts until you get the car idleing @ 900rpm AND your CO reading is a gnats whisker under 3.5%

    Obviously, before you go anywhere near the carbs you will have checked and set your plug gap, points gap and timing - 90% of carb problems are electrical.

    Every time you touch the mixture screws you should tap the dashpot with the handle of your screwdriver and open the throttle a fraction on the individual carb that you have adjusted - only a couple of hundred RPM is neccesary. Rev the engne too high and you'll blow the diaphragm in the gas tester and knacker it permenently. The purpose of this is to re-centres the jets and therefore give you a true reading on the gas tester.

    If you've set it up right, when you come off the throttle on a test drive you should get a nice little pop through the exhaust on the over run.

    -JC.
    Blimey, more complicated than I first thought! I don't have a gas tester or a balancing meter, sounds like a trip to the motor factors, woohoo!

    Thanks mate, i'll let you know how it goes...

    Graham
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Blimey, more complicated than I first thought! I don't have a gas tester or a balancing meter, sounds like a trip to the motor factors, woohoo!

    Thanks mate, i'll let you know how it goes...

    Graham
    Gas tester should be about £80-£100 and the air flow meter will either be the cheap n cheerful gunsons one for about a tenner or the more expensive compact unit @ aroudn £40.

    I use this model carb ballancer. It has a couple of other modes on it useful for the HT side of things.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Gunsons-Ga...item43adb3c6a0

    I use these to check air flow:
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Gunson-G40...item35b00c08c7

    But I would prefer to have one of these because I think they are a more accurate.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Weber-Dell...item2ebaf24c0b
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    Cheers, have added it to my watch list to see how much it goes for!

    The tools are not too expensive then, cheaper than letting the garage keep doing it! Just to convince Dad now to let me touch the E Type...
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    (Original post by JC.)
    blank
    I couldn't agree with your first post more mate, this motoring forum isn't even a motoring forum. All you see here these days are the foaming kiddie type people who don't know anything about cars, apart from refilling it at their local gas station.

    Its so full of biased opinions, incorrect "facts", and wrong advice that I try my best to stay away all the time. A notable example of such a user is the second poster in this thread, who has in the past contributed nothing other than sprouting rubbish about how good German cars are. (Among many other things as well, mind you!)

    Which is why I hang around on a specialist Ford forum with people who have decent knowledge, and a few without knowledge. But those "few" are willing to learn from the community in a constructive way, which makes it so good.

    I am surprised you even lurk around here, surely you could be having loads more fun on a MG forum, say?
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    This may as well be a learning to drive and newly passed forum tbh.

    Another thing that bugs me is the amount of pre-formed opinion about a car when I can almost guarantee you that the poster hasn't even driven that car!

    Take the car I own for example (MX5). You get all the "gay" and "hairdresser" comments (which being female I care little about) but if you've actually driven one, you'll know it's just so nice to drive and well balanced. It's not the fastest, biggest engined or coolest looking, but handles so so well and is reliable too.
    Oh well, more fun for those in the know!

    Have to say, I feel so pleased every time someone posts their first car and it isn't the standard 1.2 corsa/micra/fiesta/shopping trolley. People need to break from the norm and expand their driving horizons
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    There are motoring forums and there are student forums.

    This one is worth a laugh every now and again, but we all know better ones for discussion about cars. Although I never seem to talk about cars on motoring forums...
    • PS Reviewer
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    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by JC.)
    I didn't know hardly anything when I got my first car @ 16.
    You learn by doing things.
    I've bought a Haynes manual for my bike :proud:
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    (Original post by JC.)
    I didn't know hardly anything when I got my first car @ 16.
    You learn by doing things.
    Yes but I can't afford to keep 2 cars, and I don't want to do something to my daily car that makes it undrivable for a few days by buggering something up.
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    (Original post by her0n)
    This may as well be a learning to drive and newly passed forum tbh.

    Take the car I own for example (MX5). You get all the "gay" and "hairdresser" comments (which being female I care little about) but if you've actually driven one, you'll know it's just so nice to drive and well balanced. It's not the fastest, biggest engined or coolest looking, but handles so so well and is reliable too.
    Oh well, more fun for those in the know!
    Fyi, if you report any threads about learning to drive or taking tests then a mod(me) will move it into the learning to drive forum to keep this part for more Motoring related chat.

    Oh and the MX5 is a LOVELY car. Been round the ring in one and the power it lacks on the slightly uphill backstraight is totally made up for round the corners... WE were hassling people in Porsches on the twisty bits. Was great fun.

    (Original post by Sgt.Incontro)
    I couldn't agree with your first post more mate, this motoring forum isn't even a motoring forum. All you see here these days are the foaming kiddie type people who don't know anything about cars, apart from refilling it at their local gas station.

    Its so full of biased opinions, incorrect "facts", and wrong advice that I try my best to stay away all the time.
    There's a few people on here that do know their stuff but they don't tend to make that many threads. Some of the weirdest threads lately are made by a perm banned member that enjoys making new accounts pruely to post stupid stuff in this section.

    Also, about the projects forum going, Just post ongoing projects in this forum and it'll be fine.
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    (Original post by JC.)
    Mine arrived today.
    Frankly, I don't blame your dad - I wouldn't want to use it as a wedding car either! I do quite like it though. I reccon it'll only take me a couple of weekends to get it MOT worthy and only that long because I've got other cars that need maintainence too.
    It's only a couple of inches bigger than an MGB, but it feels massive inside in comparison.
    Pleased with it? The Esprit did share door handles with the Marina as it happens!
    Actually, got a question for you JC - do you know any good places to look for older cars beyond the obvious (ebay, PH, Autotrader, C&C etc.)? My dad traded in his (S1) Esprit, an Astra and cash for an (admittedly not that old, at the time) Orion - never forgiven him for it! These days you don't seem to even look at an Esprit for less than about £8k, might just be a sign of the times but I haven't seen many S1s about at all.
    We did acquire a vehicle more the age you appreciate last year though, even if it is a soot chucker!

    (not ours but similar, though ours has a loader on the front. Hydraulics add a few more interesting complications! The hydraulic oil reservoir is the gearbox, so lots of opportunity for oil contamination )
    (Original post by motorbiker)
    Also, about the projects forum going, Just post ongoing projects in this forum and it'll be fine.
    Aye, I realise that, but I don't visit the forum that often (soon I'm likely to be heading off to see for 6+ months at a time, with no internet access) and I'm not going to wade through all the repetitive threads to find a couple of interesting ones. I realise that my views aren't going to count for much as I rarely visit, but the projects forum was nice in that you could be away for a while and catch up with the interesting stuff. LocostBuilders and GarageJournal are where I tend to lurk for motoring stuff these days anyway.
 
 
 
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