The Student Room Logo

Oxford History Students and Applicants

Scroll to see replies

Original post by deFossard
I went there after a particularly brutal interview, too.

After spending so much time in London's and Paris's galleries, I was convinced that nowhere else in the world could have any art worth showing, since those two cities seem to have taken everything. But the Ashmolean was just fantastic, definitely going to keep exploring it.


I suppose you've visited the Musée de l'Armée at Les Invalides?

As a military historian, that was AMAZING.
My history teacher and I just ran around the place together grinning like, well...
Schoolboys!

I hardly ever take photos, but I have hundreds from that place. I preferred it infinitely the the Louvré, actually.


Original post by Incarnadine91
Awww :colondollar: Helpful maybe, wise no...

Everyone has an interview where they think they failed, still, the Ashmolean isn't a bad way to shake the feeling. :smile: And you never know, I think the Ancient History lot might have a couple of lectures there, although I may be wrong. The Archaeologists definitely do. So you might be lucky!


Well I'd say both helpful and wise :biggrin:
I don't know if I enjoyed it properly, really.
By that point I'd decided I was going to give up on history forever and become something awful like a scientist.

But now I'm okay again, I'd like to spend some proper time there.
Lectures there would be awesome!!
Reply 741
Original post by The Anti-Hero
I suppose you've visited the Musée de l'Armée at Les Invalides?

As a military historian, that was AMAZING.
My history teacher and I just ran around the place together grinning like, well...
Schoolboys!

I hardly ever take photos, but I have hundreds from that place. I preferred it infinitely the the Louvré, actually.



I've not actually. Not even heard of the place. What was there? The only history trip I did with my school was to the First World War battlefields.

The collection at the Louvre is amazing, it's just badly put together; the endless corridors of overpowering Baroque masterpieces are too wearing. They should learn from the National Gallery or the Musée D'Orsay how to put together a gallery.
Original post by deFossard
I've not actually. Not even heard of the place. What was there? The only history trip I did with my school was to the First World War battlefields.

The collection at the Louvre is amazing, it's just badly put together; the endless corridors of overpowering Baroque masterpieces are too wearing. They should learn from the National Gallery or the Musée D'Orsay how to put together a gallery.


Well the Musée de l'Armée is, as you can probably guess, purely military history. Lots of very impressive weapons (swords, guns, cannon) and armour, Napoleon's tomb is there, his coronation Eagle...
I really liked the Louvre, but for me I prefer weapons to art.
The Mona Lisa was highly underwhelming for me, too...
Again, I'm very barbaric :wink:
Original post by The Anti-Hero
Well I'd say both helpful and wise :biggrin:
I don't know if I enjoyed it properly, really.
By that point I'd decided I was going to give up on history forever and become something awful like a scientist.

But now I'm okay again, I'd like to spend some proper time there.
Lectures there would be awesome!!


This made me lol, considering I spend most of my time around scientists (the other historians in my college are all the party type, which i'm not) who are continually telling me how my subject is inferior. We can let them have their delusions of grandeur, and remember that as soon as they discover anything it becomes part of our purview as well... :biggrin:

Also, I really like old weapons too. It's a paradoxical love, because I'm a pacifist and dislike military action on principle, but they all look so cool - and war is so important to history in general. Actualy, considering I own an offensive weapon capable of punching through plate armour at 80 yards (my bow), maybe it's a good thing I'm a pacifist... :wink:
Original post by deFossard
This is the first I've heard of the exhibition, but I'll definitely have a look in my first term, probably even in my first visit to the Bodleian. Just read a little paragraph on their website about it, it sounds fantastic.

The sheer diversity of the exhibits being shown is what strikes me. It really helps to cement Oxford's position not only in British history, but as a cornerstone of Western culture. I don't think you could see the original foundations of the British constitution, the first concept of zero, or handwritten originals of modernism together in any other place. This'll definitely be one of the first things I visit at Oxford.

Pick at your will, even juggle the words around to make a new sentence if you want.

Fred de Fossard, Magdalen.


Thank you both ever so much for the quotes - I'll rep both of you now (although can you still only give rep once a day? One today and one tomorrow then!). I included quotes from both of you in the article, hope that's okay. It should be out in the first or second issue of the Cherwell in case you're interested. Enjoy the exhibition!
Reply 746
Original post by Quercus1
This is an essay question I've done in preparation for the H.A.T. It was Qu. 1 (c) from the 2010 paper. Could one very kind person who knows what is expected in the H.A.T review quickly..


http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showpost.php?p=34240701&postcount=725

Hi, further to your request a few days ago here are a few observations.

It's good that you have looked at your subject from both sides: the politician driven by public pressure yet also manipulating the public mood. However, I didn't quite feel that at the end I knew what your own position was. It's OK to conclude that in fact both were equally important, but you want your essay to stand out from the crowd, so a bolder assessment may have been more eye catching.

Also, don't forget that this is a question arising from the set passage, so anything that indicates that you have reflected on the issues raised by it would be a bonus. The passage focuses on the effectivity (or otherwise) of Parliament as a mechanism for interaction. Perhaps you could have made more of the equivalent processes at work in your chosen period, including the elections, media coverage and public protests that you briefly mention.

Although I've successfully negotiated the HAT, I'm not an Oxford student for another week or so. Much better to take the advice of a more experienced hand so am hoping you get more feedback.

Good luck with the HAT :smile:
Hi all,
On advice of my new tutor, I've made the snap decision to apply to Oxford and I was wondering to what extent I can study imperialism and colonialism at Oxford? I know it sounds like a stupid question, but I need the information so any serious reply would be appretiated.
Thanks :smile:
Reply 748
Which subject would that be? History?
Reply 749
I guess you'd have to read Modern History or straight History to take modules like that? I didn't go to Oxford but there were a couple of such modules in the History department of my university (Nottingham).
Calm down dear.

Wait until final year/masters/PhD thesis to specialise.
well, didn't all the young men who were trained to run the empire mostly study at Oxford ? haha
The list of lectures offered by the history faculty may be helpful. It is here.

There are lectures/classes offered on:
Nationalism in Western Europe, 1799-1890
The Authority of Nature 1830-1930
Imperialism and Nationalism: Theory and Practice
Imperialism and Nationalism, 1830–1980: South Asia
Imperialism and Nationalism, 1830–1990: Sub-Saharan Africa
The Emergence of Modern Africa, 1830-1990
Britain’s Settler Colonies 1830-1939: Australia, Canada, South Africa, New Zealand
... and others!

Graduate lectures in section 11.5 may be relevant?

:sheep:
(edited 12 years ago)
BA Modern History - Then just pick topics relevant

A word of warning - you will almost certainly find that in the space of 3 years you will either want to do something other than imperialism, or that the study of it is actually very different to what you imagined. My advice is not to pick a degree because you like a part of it. Even with History, the most flexible degree course, you will have to do other stuff. Make sure you do History because you like history, or ppe because you like ppe, and not just because you like imperialism. Snap decisions are very frequently bad ones.

Nb. read up on Rome, Persia and the Chinese - it should give you a better sense of whether you are interested in Empire as a concept or just in the European vision of it

If you wanted to do history degree tailored to imperialism though here is what your finals papers would be:

British paper -- after 1500 will have a few questions on Imperialism. Ideally the 19th century paper.
General paper --offers 'Imperial and Global history 1750-1914'' aka Empire paper, where you can do either Africa, South Asia, Americas, S.East Asia or Britain's 'white' colonies : SAfrica, Oz, NZ and Canada
Further Subject - 'Imperialism and Nationalism 1830-1980'
Special Subject - 'India: contesting the nation 1910-1950'
Thesis - You get to pick the topic
Disciplines - Always has a few empire related questions, as well as a few on race
Hey people. I will be applying for Oxford and I've just been reading some online examples to see how mine matches up only to find one which is kind of similar to mine. It links being a from a foreign country to curiosity for History, which is what I've also done. Should I change it our of fear UCAS will penalise me for it? There is also justification to my claim because I researched Apartheid for part of my English coursework, but of course they might not be able to verify that anyway. What should I do? This is really panicking me!!
Reply 755
Original post by molthemoo

Original post by molthemoo
Hey people. I will be applying for Oxford and I've just been reading some online examples to see how mine matches up only to find one which is kind of similar to mine. It links being a from a foreign country to curiosity for History, which is what I've also done. Should I change it our of fear UCAS will penalise me for it? There is also justification to my claim because I researched Apartheid for part of my English coursework, but of course they might not be able to verify that anyway. What should I do? This is really panicking me!!


Think in context. You have read one similar personal statement. No.1 the likelihood of it being exactly the same is minimal. No.2 UCAS does and cannot penalise applications! It simply processes them. No.3 Even if the applications are the same, why does that matter? People are allowed to have the same interests as long as they are original. They will still know who you are and cannot get you mixed up, if that's what is bothering becuase you have your name etc. on your application. All you have to worry about is preparation for the H.A.T and the interview which is what ou should be doing!
Reply 756
Original post by Quercus1

Sorry, *does not
Just wondering if any applicants or present students could offer advice on wriiten work for History.

Whats better? Coursework? or Exam stuff? My Cw is about LAtin America and is quite different to the usual cold war/Russia/Germany stuff most people send as part of their 'normal A2 work'. Just wondering what would be better? :s-smilie: stuck. America might make for interesting convo and its something that interests me more than My exam unit of Russia under Stalin. HELP!! Panic!! :s-smilie:
Reply 758
Tips for the HAT?
Reply 759
I hope that's a proposal... if so, what tips do you have? If not...I second your the plea...TIPS FOR THE H.A.T ANYONE?

Quick Reply

Latest