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    ive never been overweight, i used to be like a size 10 maybe 12, when i was in 6th form, then when i started college i lost so much weight (im now a size 8) my reckoning is that when i was at 6th form i only had to be in 1 hour a day and i used to sleep loads (cuz i had loads of spare time) then i got a job, then i started college, that was 9 months ago, so ive been doing a 7 day week 9-5 for 9 months, im just always on the go, esp. with going out and dancing my ass off several nights a week too. my advice is eat well and just be as active as you can, if your always doing something then your always burning off calories. also i heard the other day that 6 minuets of intensive excersise a day is more affective than an hours jogging, not sure how true that is, but its worth a try. good luck. and remeber your doing this for your self not someone else, or worse, the media! lol
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    (Original post by tate)
    also i heard the other day that 6 minuets of intensive excersise a day is more affective than an hours jogging, not sure how true that is,
    Probably the biggest load of *******s I've ever heard, thats how true it is
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    (Original post by tate)
    also i heard the other day that 6 minuets of intensive excersise a day is more affective than an hours jogging, not sure how true that is,
    (Original post by imasillynarb)
    Probably the biggest load of *******s I've ever heard, thats how true it is
    Tate, if you're after muscle mass, then economy is the way to go; but if it's general fitness you want to improve, then the jog will do you good. Max 6 days out of 7 though.

    Three things: economy, economy, economy.

    narby, remember when you produced a similar response to a comment from our Resident Super Duper Med Student... don't do it. Incorrect information presented in a sensationalist manner is bad, bad, bad. Only the News of the World do that.

    Another three things: education, education, education.
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    The thing is, when I produced the comment to the med student I was right..

    6minutes of intense exercise will not burn more calories than 1hour of jogging.
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    (Original post by imasillynarb)
    The thing is, when I produced the comment to the med student I was right..

    6minutes of intense exercise will not burn more calories than 1hour of jogging.

    All depends on what your after, you are both right but in different sense's. I also read the same artical and yes 4 lots of 2 minutes of highly intense running will improve your cardiac system as much as jogging for hours on end, but you are also right in saying it won't burn as many calories. So obviously it depends on the persons aim's.
    If you want to loose weight then longer exercise is required as after about 25 mins the body starts to use fat reserve's as it's energy source.
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    No, running 4 lots of 2 minutes at a high intensity is completely different to running for hours on end, the two different sessions produce compeltely different results.

    Running intensely for 2 minutes in sets will improve your anaerobic threshold and lactic tolerance, running for a couple of hours will improve your aerobic capacity.

    Don't get into the wishy washy world of using words like "as good as" when it comes to fitness.
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    THis might help

    "Maximal oxygen uptake, or V02max, is generally regarded as the best single measure of aerobic fitness. As the rate of exercise increases, your body eventually reaches a limit for oxygen consumption. This limit is the peak of your aerobic capacity, or your V02max. As intensity increases beyond V02max, your body must shift to anaerobic (without oxygen) energy production. An oxygen debt begins to build at this point and blood lactate levels climb. In general terms, one's ability to continue exercising in the face of rising oxygen deficit and lactate levels is called anaerobic capacity."

    "Izumi Tabata and his colleagues at the National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Tokyo, Japan, compared the effects of moderate-intensity endurance and high-intensity intermittent training on V02max and anaerobic capacity. (Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise (1996) 28, 1327-1330)."

    "Notice that the duration of the moderate-intensity and the high-intensity protocols are drastically different: (excluding warm-ups) one hour compared to only about 4 minutes per training schedule"

    "In the moderate-intensity group, seven active young male physical education majors exercised on stationary bicycles 5 days per week for 6 weeks at 70% of V02max, 60 minutes each session. V02max was measured before and after the training and every week during the 6 week period. As each subject's V02max improved, exercise intensity was increased to keep them pedaling at 70% of their actual V02max. Maximal accumulated oxygen deficit was also measured, before, at 4 weeks and after the training.

    A second group followed a high-intensity interval program. Seven students, also young and physically active, exercised five days per week using a training program similar to the Japanese speed skaters. After a 10-minute warm-up, the subjects did seven to eight sets of 20 seconds at 170% of V02max, with a 10 second rest between each bout. Pedaling speed was 90-rpm and sets were terminated when rpms dropped below 85. When subjects could complete more than 9 sets, exercise intensity was increased by 11 watts. The training protocol was altered one day per week. On that day, the students exercised for 30 minutes at 70% of V02max before doing 4 sets of 20 second intervals at 170% of V02max. This latter session was not continued to exhaustion. Again, V02max and anaerobic capacity was determined before, during and after the training."

    "In some respects the results were no surprise, but in others they may be ground breaking. The moderate-intensity endurance training program produced a significant increase in V02max (about 10%), but had no effect on anaerobic capacity. The high-intensity intermittent protocol improved V02max by about 14%; anaerobic capacity increased by a whopping 28%."

    Dr. Tabata said, "The fact is that the rate of increase in V02max [14% for the high-intensity protocol - in only 6 weeks] is one of the highest ever reported in exercise science."

    FAT LOSS::

    Angelo Tremblay, Ph.D., and his colleagues at the Physical Activities Sciences Laboratory, Laval University, Quebec, Canada, challenged the common belief among health professionals that low-intensity, long-duration exercise is the best program for fat loss. They compared the impact of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and high-intensity aerobics on fat loss. (Metabolism (1994) Volume 43, pp.814-818)

    The Canadian scientists divided 27 inactive, healthy, non-obese adults (13 men, 14 women, 18 to 32 years old) into two groups. They subjected one group to a 20-week endurance training (ET) program of uninterrupted cycling 4 or 5 times a week for 30 to 45 minutes; the intensity level began at 60% of heart rate reserve and progressed to 85%. (For a 30-year-old, this would mean starting at a heart rate of about 136 and progressing to roughly 170 bpm, which is more intense than usually prescribed for weight or fat loss.)

    The other group did a 15-week program including mainly high-intensity-interval training (HIIT). Much like the ET group, they began with 30-minute sessions of continuous exercise at 70% of maximum heart rate reserve (remember, they were not accustomed to exercise), but soon progressed to 10 to 15 bouts of short (15 seconds progressing to 30 seconds) or 4 to 5 long (60 seconds progressing to 90 seconds) intervals separated by recovery periods allowing heart rate to return to 120-130 beats per minute. The intensity of the short intervals was initially fixed at 60% of the maximal work output in 10 seconds, and that of the long bouts corresponded to 70% of the individual maximum work output in 90 seconds. Intensity on both was increased 5% every three weeks.

    As you might expect, the total energy cost of the ET program was substantially greater than the HIIT program. The researchers calculated that the ET group burned more than twice as many calories while exercising than the HIIT program. But (surprise, surprise) skinfold measurements showed that the HIIT group lost more subcutaneous fat. "Moreover," reported the researchers, "when the difference in the total energy cost of the program was taken into account..., the subcutaneous fat loss was ninefold greater in the HIIT program than in the ET program." In short, the HIIT group got 9 times more fat-loss benefit for every calorie burned exercising.

    Although take a look at this (which applies here):

    "The Tremblay group and Dr. Tabata, in his e-mail response to Richard Winett, emphasize this warning: "High-intensity exercise cannot be prescribed for individuals at risk for health problems or for obese people who are not used to exercise."

    source
    http://www.cbass.com/FATBURN.HTM
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    Yay - someone's quoting papers.

    *Applause*
 
 
 
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