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silence
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#321
Report Thread starter 13 years ago
#321
i would quickly stand up on behalf of spenser; obviously we're talking about his verse rather than drama, but i think he is quite magical and often overlooked.

it is also easy to dismiss shakespeare at times, whether it's picking out minor (or major) faults in his plots, clusmy verse, or even sheer boringness in his plays. when, however, you see a well executed production of one of his plays, or even focus on a short passage for hours on end for the purpose of essay writing or even pleasure (though the latter often materialises from the former), it is all so easy to understand and remember why shakespeare is the iconic, canonical and timeless literary figure who we'll never be able to leave alone.
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Flying Pythonette
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#322
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#322
(Original post by silence)
i would quickly stand up on behalf of spenser; obviously we're talking about his verse rather than drama, but i think he is quite magical and often overlooked.

it is also easy to dismiss shakespeare at times, whether it's picking out minor (or major) faults in his plots, clusmy verse, or even sheer boringness in his plays. when, however, you see a well executed production of one of his plays, or even focus on a short passage for hours on end for the purpose of essay writing or even pleasure (though the latter often materialises from the former), it is all so easy to understand and remember why shakespeare is the iconic, canonical and timeless literary figure who we'll never be able to leave alone.
Give the woman a round of applause :congrats: - Brilliant, you took the words right out of my mouth :adore:

Jess xxx
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Tyler Durden
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#323
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#323
(Original post by Blu-Tack Jess)
Give the woman a round of applause :congrats: - Brilliant, you took the words right out of my mouth :adore:

Jess xxx
Silence is of the masculine variety! :p:
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Emmy18
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#324
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#324
Well. I think I may have plugged my 'Lets stop Shakespeare from taking over 16th century literature' campaign in the wrong thread lol. I just think that discourse suggest Shakespeare is the don but if it hadn't, would we?
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Madelyn
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#325
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#325
I agree that we shouldn't read or study Shakespeare to the exclusion of Marlowe, Webster, etc., but equally, we shouldn't just read 19th century poetry or modern drama - one of the great things about English literature is that there is such a variety of it, and to ignore that is to make a huge mistake. However, Shakespeare is pretty damn cool. Like blondemoment, I've always wondered, as you go through a text picking out all the layers of meaning and so on, whether writers actually put all that in there, or if we're just reading way too much into it. But there's a line in Measure for Measure about "The needful bits and curbs to headstrong weeds": in an early version of the play, the line is "headstrong steeds". This seems better in that it continues the metaphor of bits and curbs, but actually "weeds" makes infinitely more sense in the context of the play - so Shakespeare has, presumably, made a conscious decision to change the line in order to make it 'better'. Or possibly a scribe noted it down wrongly and Shakespeare corrected it, but that does nothing to prove my point.
The thing about Shakespeare is he just has so much more than other people. You can find so many different things within one speech, one line, even ("Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang", to take perhaps the most notable example), so you can spend forever analysing tiny proortions of his work in a way that you can't with other writers to anything like the same extent.
My friend was saying the other day that when he first read Shakespeare it just immediately clicked with him - something in you responds to his language in a way which I don't really understand. Lawrence Durrell has this line about "Roots of his language, familiar as salt", which is the best expression I've come across of how Shakespeare just feels like the way English ought to be spoken.

Going back to Isabella, I'm still not convinced that there's any conscious provocation of Angelo on her part. I think it's an unconscious expression of her repressed sexuality. And the idea that
(Original post by blondemoment)
the undeniable theme of the New testament and the sermon on the mount indicates that above anything me the "measure" of character and social mores is aim of this play
doesn't really make sense to me. Shakespeare is remarkably areligious so I tend to be a bit wary of anything suggesting that he's making a religious or religion-based point generally, but specifically in relation to Measure, surely the play advocates above pretty much everything else not judging people and societies in that way - that is, after all, why Isabella and to some extent Angelo are punished.
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Flying Pythonette
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#326
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#326
(Original post by englishstudent)
Silence is of the masculine variety! :p:
I apologise Profusely - *so very ashamed*.... :adore:

A very unworthy
Jess xxx
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Pirate
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#327
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#327
Oooo let me join
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silence
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#328
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#328
i'm going to a couple of random events associated the globe over easter (or at least their membership thing called 'friends of the globe');

'Shakespeare and Miscellany' presented by this dynamic father-and-son duo. David is not only a great orator and hugely knowledgeable, but is also one of Britain's leading linguistic authorities, guaranteed to be witty, amusing and entertaining.

and

The Treasurer and Masters of the Bench of the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple now invite Friends of Shakespeare's Globe to:
A Champagne Reception and Grand Dinner at Middle Temple Hall, Temple, London; a festive banquet with an Utopian entertainment to celebrate the 400th Anniversary of the signing of the Virginia Charter. Three interludes and an original masque, after the fashion of the late Inigo Jones, will transport guests back and forth across the Atlantic expanse between the Utopian ideals of the Jacobean English and those of the indigenous Americans. The proceedings have been devised and will be performed by MR MARK RYLANCE, MR TIM CARROLL and friends using writing of the period, music of the period and original composition by MS CLAIRE VAN CAMPEN.


the latter one is going to be a bit weird i imagine, but maybe cool too.
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paupau
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#329
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#329
When are you planning to go? Or have you already went?
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silence
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#330
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#330
the talk is on the 22nd april and the dinner is on the 10th april.
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paupau
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#331
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#331
have fun >.< !!
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Toscar
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#332
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#332
im working at the globe this summer as a steward! plays 4 free!
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silence
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#333
Report Thread starter 13 years ago
#333
i was thinking about doing that! you have to attend a minimum of twelve plays though, which means with only 4 or so plays on every season.. you could end up watching plays at least 3 times each.

i've got my banquet at middle temple tonight; have no idea what to anticipate.
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Toscar
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#334
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#334
im working on the proviso that i'll miss the beginings of the plays by doing, well the job type bit, so am relying on seeing them over again to catch the bits i couldnt watch before!
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Acaila
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#335
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#335
You lucky thing My bf loves his globe shirt, and his globe poster and his....etc.
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silence
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#336
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#336
i'm off to see romeo and juliet in stratford today... one of my favourite tragedies that i've read or seen a film of.. hopefully it will be great on stage.
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Tyler Durden
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#337
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#337
How was it?
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silence
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#338
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#338
quite good; they had tap dancing implemented into the fight scenes, romeo seemed a tiny bit mad/silly/immature and they didn't quite get the balance right between the light and heavy (tragic and comic) moments of the drama.

also, stratford annoyed me a tiny bit (first time i've been) - it's way too shakespeared up.
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Tyler Durden
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#339
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#339
Ah, I quite liked that about the place! And to be honest if you see how much somewhere like Dorchester makes about Hardy (a fair bit!) then you can sort of understand why Stratford goes to the lengths it does (given that it's Shakespeare). Did you pick up any tacky memorabilia? I remember I got a poster of the cover of the First Folio... oh and a quill . In my defence I was about 14. Hehe.

As for the play; I'd always think I'd find it quite daunting to stage a Shakespeare performance. I dunno - you always see these fancy ideas (tap dancing, all male-casts, etc) but it's quite hard to be truly original with Shaks somehow. Whereas at school I was involved with a few other plays (generally Eastern-European stuff, Chekhov, Buchner, Gogol etc) and they just seem far easier to stage and they seemed to work "better" than the Shakespeare that was put on.
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silence
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#340
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#340
i think it's because it's so difficult, if not impossible, to put on a production as they would have done at the time that the producers sometimes automatically assume that they've got an extra degree of creative licence. also, unlike other plays perhaps, these plays have been being performed for centuries, so i suppose that any new production has to be a bit different or exciting. let's just wait 400 years and see what people do to beckett or pinter plays.
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