The Shakespeare Society Watch

etherised
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#361
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#361
(Original post by englishstudent)
What, roughly, are you going to do?
Well, this was for an AHRC collborative doctoral award. That is, funding comes attached, but you have to do a specified topic. It's on the relationship between dramaturgy and theatrical space, with particular reference to the King's Men repertory. So, essentially, looking at how - or indeed whether - the different architecture of the indoor Blackfriars and the amphitheatre Globe(s) affect the writing. If you're particularly interested, you can read the summary here.

I suspect the competition will be tough, so I don't have high hopes of getting it. But I have my own ideas if this falls through, so we'll see.
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Toscar
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#362
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#362
(Original post by zigguratted)
Well, this was for an AHRC collborative doctoral award. That is, funding comes attached, but you have to do a specified topic. It's on the relationship between dramaturgy and theatrical space, with particular reference to the King's Men repertory. So, essentially, looking at how - or indeed whether - the different architecture of the indoor Blackfriars and the amphitheatre Globe(s) affect the writing. If you're particularly interested, you can read the summary here.

I suspect the competition will be tough, so I don't have high hopes of getting it. But I have my own ideas if this falls through, so we'll see.
i remember kemode's the age of shakespeare has an interesting bit about this.... and surely, you'd dwell a little the battle of the theatres? both from hamlet, and also the other plays by jonson /beaumont?
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etherised
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#363
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#363
The war of the theatres is something of a discredited theory these days. Read Roslyn Knutson, Playing Companies and Commerce in Shakespeare's Time
. She demolishes the previous arguments for the 'War'. Also, for this particular collaborative award, given that it's focussed on one company, one assumes the company is not competing with itself...

As for Kermode, I rather suspect the panel would laugh in my face if I brought him up. (He's dated. I mean, I don't deny he's written some good stuff and all. I'm rather fond of Shakespeare's Language. But his methodology/approach is, shall we say, traditional.)

But, gah, I do need to come up with something fabulously original in the next, er, 12 hours or so. Oh well.


Incidentally, Coriolanus? I didn't much like. Though Volumnia was good.
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silence
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#364
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#364
mm i've never even read the play, which can at times be an advantage when it comes to watching a performance. ah well, i shall see.

i'm currently trying to do, well, actually have given up, twelfth night revision for an exam on saturday. i'll probably just rabbit on about plautus or something; it looks like the question will have something to do with comedy in general. aah, also need to read some aristotle.
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etherised
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#365
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#365
Yeah, I really like going to see Shakespeare plays that I'm unfamiliar with. You reach a point when you've read enough drama from that period that it's possible to follow and pick up quite a lot just from the first hearing, despite the density of the language. So you can appreciate the language and the cleverness of it all, and at the same time watch it for the plot. Sadly I'm slightly running out of plays I can do this with. But I guess I can always move on to Middleton or something.

I was thinking about this watching Corio, actually. I had read it, but years ago and could barely remember what happened, so it felt new to me. But it's got such complex patterns of imagery running through it. I can't believe that most people watching it now pick up on much of that. Or, for that matter, people from the time.

Also, exams on a saturday? That's just mean.
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Squibs
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#366
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#366
I'd LOVE to join!! My favourites are Lear, taming of the shrew and much ado about nothig, am trying to read henry Vth but not getting on well due to tother revision needs...
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Squibs
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#367
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#367
Zigguratted, you think that exams on a Saturday are evil? Try school all week every week from Monday 8am to Saturday 12.30 for the past three years! That's evil! Anyway, good luck for that exam silence! Also, what did people think of the Shakespeare re-told series which ran on the BBC in January/Febuary? I thought the taming of the shrew was the best, but I wasn't sure about the whole MacBeth and Much Ado About Nothing thing...
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Madelyn
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#368
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#368
(Original post by Squibs)
Also, what did people think of the Shakespeare re-told series which ran on the BBC in January/Febuary? I thought the taming of the shrew was the best, but I wasn't sure about the whole MacBeth and Much Ado About Nothing thing...
I really liked the Much Ado, I thought that was the best of the series. But then I'm quite keen on both the lead actors, and I've seen the Branagh/Thompson version so many times (my little sister went through a big Much Ado phase) that it was a bit of a relief to see it being done differently! Though their interpretation of Sonnet 116 did annoy me.
I find Taming of the Shrew quite difficult to get on with generally, and felt that the BBC version failed to address what I see as the main issue - the way that Katharina is (usually seen to be) forced into accepting her marriage and bowing to her husband's will.

I realised the other day that I'll never study Shakespeare again. Isn't that terrible? Of course I'll still read Shakespeare and see the plays and everything, but I've written my last Shakespeare essay.
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silence
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#369
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#369
you never know what the future holds. maybe one day, after a long journey through academia, you have to talk about shakey somewhere... maybe linked with plautus or something. what/where are you doing/going again? i seem to remember russian or italian or something lol.
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Madelyn
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#370
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#370
I suppose I could do a big Plautus/Shagsbeard thing, going with the whole "Plautus is the Latin Shakespeare" idea. Hmm...
I'm going to London, to do French and...something else. I'm resitting Latin (including our old friend Plautypus) this summer (that is, in a couple of weeks. How time flies when you're having fun.) and it all depends on that. If I get a B I'm going to King's to do Classical Studies and French, if not it's UCL and French and Russian. What I really want to do is Classics and French and Russian all together, but for some reason no one seems to offer that.
Are you still Plautusing (how many times can I get his name into one post?) away, or have you been lured over to the delights of English?
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silence
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#371
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#371
i've been joying with the delights of english, but i could never abandon plautus! doing 12th night this year gave me licence to read menaechmi.. and it's always fun to refer back to rudens as well.

they're some hardcore subject choices.. i've tried taking modules outside my department this year (classics related) but really can't do more than one subject really. three would be insane. good luck in the exam, hope you end up where you want, but both options seem pretty great.
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**noooni**
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#372
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#372
Please me i join!
I :suith: Shakespeare
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silence
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#373
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#373
saw coriolanus (at the globe) the other night.. was neither amazed nor upset by it... though i barely know the play, it seemed as if quite a few downfalls were in the play itself rather than that production.

i did consider a few general issues on the side: one being, in the days of the original globe, performances like this would aim to take the audience back to roman times. regarding the function of the modern globe, which is to take us back to shakespearian times, it's quite a mixture of temporal dimensions. any strangeness this brought about was seen quite clearly in some of the costume design..

titus next weekend!
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etherised
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#374
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#374
I really wished they'd done Coriolanus in modern dress. They were pushing the idea of the company speaking for the audience (or rather, the audience as the masses within the play). But the dress hampered that so much...

Not strictly Shakespeare, but, speaking of plays of that period, I saw Cheek by Jowl's The Changeling last week (at the Barbican) and it was amazing. Highly recommended. I really want to see their Russian Twelfth Night now (it's part of the RSC's Bardfest).
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coffeeaddict
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#375
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#375
Fabulous idea btw. I'd love to join.

Went to go and see "Juliet's Balcony" in Italy last hols. It was oh-so commercialised but insightful all the same.

So what's everyone's fav Shakespeare play?
Currently I'd have to say Hamlet, but forever changing my mind!
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Angelil
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#376
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#376
Currently? 'Cymbeline'.
Subject to change of course...
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silence
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#377
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#377
oo i'd love to see the changeling actually... it appeared very vividly in my head when i read it; i'd be interested to see de flores onstage. actually, it looks like it's only on for another couple of weeks. hmm, i might have to be hardcore and see it the day after titus. i'm going to do a week of reading all those renaissance plays i've never had time to read i think..
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Kieny
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#378
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#378
Since this is officially the Shakespeare Society - can anyone point me towards misogynistic readings of 'Othello'. I cant understand how women were actually viewed as intrinsically evil in the Renaissance 15-17th Centuries? The extent of the distrust is summarised for me by Josep Sweetnam ...

"Eagles eat not men till they are dead, but women devoure them alive"

What could drive men to this great fear of women? Surely this must be slightly exaggerated or else hold some logic truth .. On the same note those of you that have read The Da Vinci Code or seen the film might see the suppresion of the 'holy grail' as a source of unease and concern towards women ...

Any ideas?
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etherised
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#379
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#379
Hmmm, good question. (Though, are you looking for contemporary misogyny, or for later commentaries which have seen Othello as representative of that? Or both?)

This is more relevant to, say, Macbeth, but there's a definite witchcraft theme which leads to women (particularly, I think, older women living alone in small societies) being villified. Though that's a bit dodgy as men get prosecuted for witchcraft as well...

Or there's generally a fear of women dominating men or being unruly/uncontrollable - which gets explored in Shrew and in Fletcher's The Tamer Tamed. Also possibly not very relevant, given that Desdemona tends rather more to the submissive.

How late are you going? Milton has some, er, interesting things to say about women, I seem to recall, though it's a while since I read them.

You could have a look at:
Sara Mendelson and Patricia Crawford, Women in Early Modern England, 1550-1720 (Oxford: OUP, 1999)
Kate Aughterson (ed.), Renaissance Women: Constructions of Femininity in England (London: Routledge, 1995)
might give you some ideas...
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Kieny
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#380
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#380
(Original post by zigguratted)
Hmmm, good question. (Though, are you looking for contemporary misogyny, or for later commentaries which have seen Othello as representative of that? Or both?)

This is more relevant to, say, Macbeth, but there's a definite witchcraft theme which leads to women (particularly, I think, older women living alone in small societies) being villified. Though that's a bit dodgy as men get prosecuted for witchcraft as well...

Or there's generally a fear of women dominating men or being unruly/uncontrollable - which gets explored in Shrew and in Fletcher's The Tamer Tamed. Also possibly not very relevant, given that Desdemona tends rather more to the submissive.

How late are you going? Milton has some, er, interesting things to say about women, I seem to recall, though it's a while since I read them.

You could have a look at:
Sara Mendelson and Patricia Crawford, Women in Early Modern England, 1550-1720 (Oxford: OUP, 1999)
Kate Aughterson (ed.), Renaissance Women: Constructions of Femininity in England (London: Routledge, 1995)
might give you some ideas...
Thank you greatly/

I have deeply researched the topic by this juncture and have unearthed some particularly interesting fragments (see my sig - a quote by a contemporary critic who seems to prove that women were very much feared) although there is evidence to the contrary as well. Desdemona does pursue an actively feminine role in her injunction of a core Biblical tract that states:

"..for this cause a man shall leave father and mother and shall be joined unto his wife.."

This is used as a support for her 'elopement' and accused lack of duty - as she now has greater responsibilities to her husband. This transgendering device is particularly significant as Brabantio has no response and she wins the argument. Furthermore this issue is compounded by the fact that James I - recently ascended Monarch translted the bible - himself a staunch supporter of the Patriarchal code.

There is much more but i must return to my revision... Thanks again
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