The Shakespeare Society Watch

Madelyn
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#381
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#381
I hate to state the obvious, but will do so anyway. Surely women are viewed as 'evil' because of Eve eating the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden and thus being the downfall of man? So women are not only wicked in themselves, but also in the way in which they tempt poor honest men away from the path of righteousness.

Going back to favourite Shakespeare, I'm still into Measure for Measure, because there's just so much in it and so many different views to consider and studying it was really fun. Not that I miss my English lessons or anything.
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Kieny
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#382
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#382
(Original post by Madelyn)
I hate to state the obvious, but will do so anyway. Surely women are viewed as 'evil' because of Eve eating the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden and thus being the downfall of man? So women are not only wicked in themselves, but also in the way in which they tempt poor honest men away from the path of righteousness.

Going back to favourite Shakespeare, I'm still into Measure for Measure, because there's just so much in it and so many different views to consider and studying it was really fun. Not that I miss my English lessons or anything.
Yes - sorry i didnt mention that one - but i did say there was a very expendable list ...

The instance of which u speak is definitely significant as what is known as the 'Original Sin' ... The bible says that following this primeordial sin man became mortal - Dante touches upon this point too in his Divina Comedia (Sorry i like to quote corrrectly when its in Italian ... see flag) and all sins followed as a result. But i think just taking this answer is a bit simplistic and narrow minded (heaven forbid that im targetting that statement at you .. but in order to fully understand a topic that would be too narrow im sure you'd agree) and a fuller explanation is called for.

Im not particularly well versed in that particular work - although i will be sure to peruse it at a greater depth when i have finished climbing the allegorical mountain of exams
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rahmara
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#383
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#383
(Original post by coffeeaddict)
Fabulous idea btw. I'd love to join.

Went to go and see "Juliet's Balcony" in Italy last hols. It was oh-so commercialised but insightful all the same.

So what's everyone's fav Shakespeare play?
Currently I'd have to say Hamlet, but forever changing my mind!
Romeo and Juliet

always :rolleyes:
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Kieny
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#384
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#384
(Original post by rahmara)
Romeo and Juliet

always :rolleyes:
Romeo and Juliet is really good...
Henry V's not bad either ...
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Angelil
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#385
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#385
(Original post by Kieny)
There is much more but i must return to my revision... Thanks again
What are you talking about, this is the Shakespeare thread! You are revising
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happydinosaur
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#386
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#386
(Original post by Angelil)
What are you talking about, this is the Shakespeare thread! You are revising
True, true. Shame the same doesn't apply to line learning..though if we start a big Henry V discussion then maybe I could call it research :p:
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Kieny
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#387
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#387
(Original post by happydinosaur)
True, true. Shame the same doesn't apply to line learning..though if we start a big Henry V discussion then maybe I could call it research :p:
I wish
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happydinosaur
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#388
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#388
(Original post by Kieny)
I wish
Well, I can try!!:p:

Back to line learning in the real world it is then..:rolleyes:
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Kieny
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#389
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#389
(Original post by happydinosaur)
Well, I can try!!:p:

Back to line learning in the real world it is then..:rolleyes:
Too true unfortunately :rolleyes:
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Toscar
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#390
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#390
(Original post by coffeeaddict)
Fabulous idea btw. I'd love to join.

Went to go and see "Juliet's Balcony" in Italy last hols. It was oh-so commercialised but insightful all the same.

So what's everyone's fav Shakespeare play?
Currently I'd have to say Hamlet, but forever changing my mind!
seriously? what insights, pray? Basically its an excuse for italians to sell merchandise and for tourists to graphiti wallspace with silly words, ala, "kate4barry4eva"....

in the last two 'titus' plays i have stewarded, a total of 7 people have fainted.... and one of the actors dislocated an arm... so cool!
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silence
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#391
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#391
woah. i saw someone faint last summer during the tempest... i'm guessing these people are fainting due to the gory nature of the play?... i can't wait to see it actually, but i really need to read it beforehand.
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Tyler Durden
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#392
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#392
Titus is rank; I pretty much turned veggie for three days after watching the film with Anthony Hopkins. It's quite a good one to read though - it's gripping and action-packed. It's like an Elizabethan Kill Bill almost.
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Angelil
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#393
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#393
(Original post by silence)
woah. i saw someone faint last summer during the tempest... i'm guessing these people are fainting due to the gory nature of the play?... i can't wait to see it actually, but i really need to read it beforehand.
Sometimes people faint just because they become overheated in the theatre. We were singing at the Windsor Festival once - it was really warm and we were quite crammed in - and a girl fainted a couple of rows behind me. Just happens sometimes.
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Kieny
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#394
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#394
(Original post by silence)
woah. i saw someone faint last summer during the tempest... i'm guessing these people are fainting due to the gory nature of the play?... i can't wait to see it actually, but i really need to read it beforehand.
Im not really getting that ... the Tempest isnt a gory play at all :confused: . Maybe the person in question was so overwhelmed by Prospero's subtle deceit ... maybe not.
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silence
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#395
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#395
it was actually a really good play and performance. i think that about half a dozen people must have fainted though... it really was quite mad.
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happydinosaur
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#396
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#396
Last night I was watching the culture show on BB2 and there was a feature about someone attempting to see every Shakespeare play in 30 days. Wouldn't that be so much fun. If I had the time and money I would love to do that just to say I had. It made interesting watching as he went to a heatre so see Northern Broadsides War of the Roses Trilogy and did interviews with the cast about it. I shall want to see how that turns out!
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Kieny
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#397
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#397
(Original post by happydinosaur)
Last night I was watching the culture show on BB2 and there was a feature about someone attempting to see every Shakespeare play in 30 days. Wouldn't that be so much fun. If I had the time and money I would love to do that just to say I had. It made interesting watching as he went to a heatre so see Northern Broadsides War of the Roses Trilogy and did interviews with the cast about it. I shall want to see how that turns out!
Mmmm...

I guess that would give a fascinating insight on correlations between the plays as well - yet again to full appreciate that experiance one should really read all of the plays before attending the theatrical performance.

Another issue is that sometimes i find that actors and directors of the performance have taken undue liberties in Shakespeare's original thoughts or ideas. This makes me fairly unsettled and quite ANGRY. I understand that part of the beauty of plays are that they are in the eye of the beholder and this can shift dramatically - but sometimes i think this is taken too far.

At the same time however - there are some instances that i have seen, where the director and actors have introduced some fantastic new elements to the play that i had not thought of before and that really strike a harmonious chord with how i feel Shakespeare might have intended the play to be viewed. When that happens it is truly fantastic
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happydinosaur
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#398
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#398
(Original post by Kieny)
Mmmm...

I guess that would give a fascinating insight on correlations between the plays as well - yet again to full appreciate that experiance one should really read all of the plays before attending the theatrical performance.

Another issue is that sometimes i find that actors and directors of the performance have taken undue liberties in Shakespeare's original thoughts or ideas. This makes me fairly unsettled and quite ANGRY. I understand that part of the beauty of plays are that they are in the eye of the beholder and this can shift dramatically - but sometimes i think this is taken too far.

At the same time however - there are some instances that i have seen, where the director and actors have introduced some fantastic new elements to the play that i had not thought of before and that really strike a harmonious chord with how i feel Shakespeare might have intended the play to be viewed. When that happens it is truly fantastic
Best warn you, I am a theatre student so my idea about Shakespeare and yours are probably miles apart. I don't feel there is anything wrong with taking his plays and adjusting them slightly. About to perform in Prince Hal which is a heavily abridged version of Henry IV parts 1 & 2 and Henry V. I love Shakespeare because it is such perfect material to take and turn into something very modern and of now. This play I am in is taking the themes and putting them in the context of a football hooligans and armys of thugs. Yeh sometimes things do get taken too far and don't work but surely there is no harm in experimenting..There is some merit to seeing the plays how they were done because it is interesting.

Otherwise there is the danger that generations to come will be so alienated by Shakespeare because the language doesn't make sense and it is considered old and stuffy. I don't like to think of his plays as the preserve of the academics but as stories for everyone to love and enjoy. At the end of the day the plays are basically really good stories.

Plays are written to be performed in my view and are a directors medium and an actors medium, there to be experimented with and given new interpretations. I wouldn't want to go see a play if it was the same as every other performancce of it.
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Angelil
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#399
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#399
As Kieny said, I don't mind experimentation as long as it doesn't overly detract from the original play.
I don't agree with you that modification of the language is necessary in order to prevent younger generations from feeling distant from it. Baz Luhrmann's Romeo and Juliet changed the setting, but the language remained completely the same and it worked wonderfully.
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happydinosaur
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#400
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#400
(Original post by Angelil)
As Kieny said, I don't mind experimentation as long as it doesn't overly detract from the original play.
I don't agree with you that modification of the language is necessary in order to prevent younger generations from feeling distant from it. Baz Luhrmann's Romeo and Juliet changed the setting, but the language remained completely the same and it worked wonderfully.
Indeed it did. Love that film! I don't think modification of the language is needed to keep younger generations interested (although I did love those recent BBC reworkings of the plays) I am not opposed to heavy cutting though, as a lot of the time I find the there are bits of the plays which just aren't required now for the play to work as a sucessful piece of theatre. When aimed at children in particular
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