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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    but do most young people realise that these accents exist? Surely these accents are not considered as strong accents? It always seemed to me that apart from the Midwest, Bostonian, New Yorker, Californian, Texan and Southern accents, most people considered other accents as being almost the same.
    Most young people are so oblivious that they don't realize that the rest of the world exists. The Philly accent is particularly strong, I don't have enough experience with Seattle or Maine to say that they are, in themselves, distinct. Chicago, Cleveland, and New Jersey all have strong accents, as well.

    and I haven't got a clue about this Pittsburgh accent your refer to :confused:
    I didn't refer to a Pittsburgh in that post, but there is a strong one. It sounds similar to a Chicago accent--a result of all of the Slavs who moved here in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Of course, as with most other strong accents, educated people don't really speak with it, except in jest.
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    I know but he doesn't speak Scots, doesn't live in Scotland and wouldn't be considered as representative of the typical Scot. My bad... (the number of americanisms is shocking...)
    Which is perhaps a good indicator of why such cultural isolation is ridiculous?

    As long as someone uses understandable English that gets their point across effectively- I see no problem.

    Tony Blair wasn't exactly going into entirely American language. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    Yep, even I notice it and it goes further than the pronunciation of "about"... but I met a lot of young Canadians, some of whom would claim they had no accent (meaning they sounded like any other average North American). Obviously as a kid, most people don't quite get the concept of accent and don't realise that everyone has one.
    Well, people tend to fall in the trap of thinking that their accent sounds like the general North American TV-accent. It's just a result of spending most of their time confined to one area of similar accents.
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    (Original post by Iz the Wiz)
    Yeah, it's funny because also, the New Orleans city accent is famous for sounding just like New York, even though it's way down south. And the reason is that the immigrants to both cities came from almost the same parts of Europe.

    I know Canadians are mostly Scottish, so I don't understand why their accent sounds like NWers', who are heavily Norwegian. But that's how it strikes my ears.

    I guess maybe the East Coast accent is generic. You either speak with a city accent or you speak generically.
    I get what you mean when saying the Scottish accent sounds a bit Scandinavian but to my ears (so this is totally subjective), Dutch and Scandinavian accents sound a bit like strong Scottish accents except I don't have a clue what they're saying.
    Canadians are not mostly Scots (there were never enough Scots in the first place). You'd probably find 1 Scottish immigrant for every 3 English immigrants in Canada but this ratio changes with the provinces but compared to other countries Scots emigrated to, Canada was definitely the destination of choice: the number of Mcwhatever places in Canada is crazy...
    The thing is, Scottish heritage is more emphasized in Canada because it's what makes Canada different to the US, just as Irish heritage makes certain people and certain states different in the US.
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    (Original post by Iz the Wiz)
    Yeah, it's funny because also, the New Orleans city accent is famous for sounding just like New York, even though it's way down south. And the reason is that the immigrants to both cities came from almost the same parts of Europe.
    :eek: :eek: The Cajuns sound NOTHING like New Yorkers to me!?
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    (Original post by psychic_satori)
    :eek: :eek: The Cajuns sound NOTHING like New Yorkers to me!?

    Well, people tend to fall in the trap of thinking that their accent sounds like the general North American TV-accent. It's just a result of spending most of their time confined to one area of similar accents.
    Not all people in New Orleans are Cajuns though, only those of French heritage right?

    And yep... it's also due to spending too much in front of the TV and thinking that you live inside some teen series (this was a point made by a funny guy from Brum to describe the behaviour of a lot of North American kids and funnily enough he was spot on because that actually seemed to correspond to the behaviour of a lot of kids there).
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    (Original post by Trier)
    Which is perhaps a good indicator of why such cultural isolation is ridiculous?

    As long as someone uses understandable English that gets their point across effectively- I see no problem.

    Tony Blair wasn't exactly going into entirely American language. :rolleyes:
    It's not the biggest, most shocking americanism I've ever heard, although it's a big one, especially considering the fact that we have exactly the same expression in the UK and it's called "full stop". I would understand if someone (maybe not the PM) used an americanism because there was no equivalent expression. I'm surprised by his usage of an american expression just as I'd be surprised if he started talking in cockney. As far as I'm concerned he made him sound like he was trying to sound like a US politician.
    As for my comment about him being Scottish, I did known that he had grown up in Scotland but had totally forgotten.
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    Not all people in New Orleans are Cajuns though, only those of French heritage right?
    It's a nickname for anyone from New Orleans, regardless of their actual heritage.
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    (Original post by psychic_satori)
    It's a nickname for anyone from New Orleans, regardless of their actual heritage.
    I guess that makes sense. Not that many people are of French heritage. I was deeply shocked to find out that the part of the US with the strongest French heritage was....New England :eek:
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    :rolleyes: You're one of those?

    and I was ashamed for pronouncing the greek letter beta as "beyta" intstead of "beeta" after going to a Canadian Uni...

    and all these Americans (such as you psychic_sartori...) who are taking offense from this thread, it's not an attack on American English. You guys use English because that's the language spoken around you. It's not something that is intertwined with your culture (at least not officially). Most people seem quite unphased by the increase of Spanish usage.
    We're very tolerant in the UK but English is our language (at least for the vast majority). It's the official language and it can't be separated from our culture, from our country. It defines who we are. Obviously, you're not going to see things the way we do. In this country, Scots use their own variant of English, Scots (in addition to other languages like Gaelic), Geordies from Newcastle have their own expressions: it's part of their culture. If Blair started using Scots, a lot of Scottish people would start saying "who does this **** think he is?" because he's mimicking a culture that isn't his own.
    I understand where you are coming from. There is a lot of emotional baggage associated with a country's official language. The USA doesn't have an official language, so we don't feel the same need to preserve language.

    I think you may have inadvertently ruffled some feathers with this comment:

    Sure he could have done that but in the UK we say
    "There will be no discussion on the EU rebate. Full Stop.". What he said was not what I expected from a well-educated guy during the PM questions. No big deal but I was still surprised.
    It sounds like you are saying well-educated people don't use our expressions and, even though that may be true in the UK, I can see how many Americans would take offense to reading a comment like that.
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    (Original post by Made in the USA)
    I understand where you are coming from. There is a lot of emotional baggage associated with a country's official language. The USA doesn't have an official language, so we don't feel the same need to preserve language.

    I think you may have inadvertently ruffled some feathers with this comment:



    It sounds like you are saying well-educated people don't use our expressions and, even though that may be true in the UK, I can see how many Americans would take offense to reading a comment like that.
    That would makes sense then. Thanks for pointing that out. There's nothing wrong with American English, it's a rich and interesting form of English but it all depends on whom it's spoken by that's all I was saying. Just as I admire Spanish spoken by a Spaniard from Madrid and not Spanish spoken by a British secondary school student doing GCSE Spanish (if that makes any sense).
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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    I guess that makes sense. Not that many people are of French heritage. I was deeply shocked to find out that the part of the US with the strongest French heritage was....New England :eek:
    Those French lumberjacks were so much cheaper to employ! The Mexicans of their day!

    [And they are responsible for possibly the best disease name in medicine--Jumping Frenchmen of Maine Disease!]
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    Its a microcosm of Blairite Britain, Americanisation is something the French are up in arms about and we should be too. Its not just 'period' the majority of American idioms over here (spoken primarily by the educated middle and upper classes) are grammatical nonsensities. Which is why its so exasperating to me.

    Perhaps its some kind of obstinate post-imperialist attempt at holding a cultural dominance, but I truly believe American culture is crap.
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    (Original post by OpressedMass)
    Its a microcosm of Blairite Britain, Americanisation is something the French are up in arms about and we should be too. Its not just 'period' the majority of American idioms over here (spoken primarily by the educated middle and upper classes) are grammatical nonsensities. Which is why its so exasperating to me.

    Perhaps its some kind of obstinate post-imperialist attempt at holding a cultural dominance, but I truly believe American culture is crap.
    Well, that's friendly :rolleyes:
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    Its also quite ironic in that Blair, constantly denying that he's Bush's lapdog, goes and uses such a blatant Americanism. Having said that, Ive noticed it for years.
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    (Original post by Iz the Wiz)
    Doesn't it bother you that you hardly ever hear the New York accent anymore, and everyone increasingly talks like the cast of Friends?
    For starters, the NY accent still exists. Just go to Staten Island or southwest Brooklyn. And if it didn't, why should I care? There are better things to be concerned about than someone's accent.
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    I find it rather amusing that some of you think George Bush is "uneducated".
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    He may be 'educated', I dont know. Im firm in my opinion, however, that he is undoubtedly stupid.
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    (Original post by OpressedMass)
    He may be 'educated', I dont know. Im firm in my opinion, however, that he is undoubtedly stupid.
    While he is undoubtedly stupid, his education would more than likely surpass that of anyone on this forum.
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    Out of interest, where did he go?
 
 
 
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