How long will it take to pass if i start taking automatic lessons? Watch

misstalkalot
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#1
Basically, i had been taking lessons in manual but found it hard. Now i start uni and it's abit of a trek to get up so early and travel to uni so i want to start doing driving lessons but in automatic. Just curious how long you think it would take to do lessons in automatic like roughly how many months i'm pretty much a quick learner.

Also what car would you recommend for a uni student?

Thanks in advance
0
reply
DJW
Badges: 7
#2
Report 10 years ago
#2
It might be ever so slightly quicker but at the end of it you're stuck with only being able to drive automatics, so what's the point?
0
reply
xmarilynx
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 10 years ago
#3
(Original post by DJW)
It might be ever so slightly quicker but at the end of it you're stuck with only being able to drive automatics, so what's the point?
This. There's very little point in getting a licence that allows you to drive only automatics!

Plus, I doubt you'd pass that much quicker anyway. It's not learning to use the gears that takes time, it's roadcraft.
1
reply
amenhotep
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#4
Report 10 years ago
#4
(Original post by misstalkalot)
Basically, i had been taking lessons in manual but found it hard. Now i start uni and it's abit of a trek to get up so early and travel to uni so i want to start doing driving lessons but in automatic. Just curious how long you think it would take to do lessons in automatic like roughly how many months i'm pretty much a quick learner.

Also what car would you recommend for a uni student?

Thanks in advance
I spoke casually about this to a driving instructor who lives close to me and he said what the people before me are saying, that it would not be significantly quicker/easier as people quickly master gears (or at least how they should be sing them).
I wanted to get both a motorcycle license and a car license.

As for a car for university, a smallish, economical (fuel consumption) and reliable one would be wise. Insurance would be cheaper for such cars.
The backseats in most cars go down, so luggage space is unlikely to be an issue.
0
reply
Steeps
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report 10 years ago
#5
Should be slightly quicker as there's no stalling/bite point bits to get used to when doing the moves, as a "quick learner" gears shouldn't be that much of an issue, it becomes subconcious with practice. Learning to drive takes as long as it takes, only way to know is to do it.

Car... now here comes the fun part, are you getting it to commute? If so the last thing you'll want is a grotty little rotbox with a gearbox sapping out all the power if you're going to be driving it daily to and from uni. Smaller cars are geared for city use and are not very economical on a long run unless you're happy to sit at 50 behind the lorries. Insurance is also not always cheaper for small cars as young people have a habit of writing them off.
0
reply
JC.
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 10 years ago
#6
(Original post by xmarilynx)
This. There's very little point in getting a licence that allows you to drive only automatics!

Plus, I doubt you'd pass that much quicker anyway. It's not learning to use the gears that takes time, it's roadcraft.

For goodness sake how many more times.
On the flip side, there's "very little point" in getting a manual licence if you only ever intend to own automatics.

I've driven manual cars for nearly 6 years now. I've just changed my daily driver to a Jag XJ6 auto and I doubt whether I'll ever own a manual car again. Admittedly my weekend toy is a manual, but I shall be changing that very soon anyway.

An automatic only licence isn't neccesarily a negative thing.
5
reply
IWantSomeMushu
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 10 years ago
#7
I doubt that it's that much quicker. Clutch control and gears don't take that long to learn, the major hurdle is awareness and knowing what to do and when to do it. I'd recommend that you learn in a manual, at least then you can drive automatic and manual cars.
0
reply
DJW
Badges: 7
#8
Report 10 years ago
#8
(Original post by JC.)
On the flip side, there's "very little point" in getting a manual licence if you only ever intend to own automatics.
When you're 17/18 how can you know for a fact you'll only ever need to drive an automatic for the rest of your life?
It makes no sense to only learn to drive an auto (in Britain) for the sake of saving yourself a month at the most and then end up doing lessons and the whole test again at some point later life. Maybe the OP would only ever drive an auto and it'd be fine, but taking a tiny bit longer to pass your test would ensure you can drive whatever you want after that.
0
reply
xmarilynx
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 10 years ago
#9
(Original post by JC.)
For goodness sake how many more times.
On the flip side, there's "very little point" in getting a manual licence if you only ever intend to own automatics.

I've driven manual cars for nearly 6 years now. I've just changed my daily driver to a Jag XJ6 auto and I doubt whether I'll ever own a manual car again. Admittedly my weekend toy is a manual, but I shall be changing that very soon anyway.

An automatic only licence isn't neccesarily a negative thing.
I'm not sure why your opinion on my response was so scathing.

Considering I doubt getting an automatic licence will be any easier/quicker, I still believe that there is a great deal of point in getting a manual licence as that will enable you to drive both. Since they both require the same amount of time and effort to learn, I don't see why someone would choose to deliberately limit themselves in the future, as even if their own car is an automatic they may need to borrow a friend's/partner's car at some point or use a company car. Plus when I was looking for a car, I saw far more manuals for sale than automatics, which were far cheaper, so with regards to actually getting a car it's probably easier in that respect. And as DJW said, I doubt you can decide upon the type of car you will be driving for the rest of your life when you haven't even passed your test yet.
0
reply
JC.
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 10 years ago
#10
(Original post by DJW)
When you're 17/18 how can you know for a fact you'll only ever need to drive an automatic for the rest of your life?
It makes no sense to only learn to drive an auto (in Britain) for the sake of saving yourself a month at the most and then end up doing lessons and the whole test again at some point later life. Maybe the OP would only ever drive an auto and it'd be fine, but taking a tiny bit longer to pass your test would ensure you can drive whatever you want after that.
Cross that bridge when you come to it. How do you know for a fact you wont want to drive a tank? Better get a tracked vehicle licence at 18 then too by that logic!
1
reply
JC.
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 10 years ago
#11
(Original post by xmarilynx)
I'm not sure why your opinion on my response was so scathing.

Considering I doubt getting an automatic licence will be any easier/quicker, I still believe that there is a great deal of point in getting a manual licence as that will enable you to drive both. Since they both require the same amount of time and effort to learn, I don't see why someone would choose to deliberately limit themselves in the future, as even if their own car is an automatic they may need to borrow a friend's/partner's car at some point or use a company car. Plus when I was looking for a car, I saw far more manuals for sale than automatics, which were far cheaper, so with regards to actually getting a car it's probably easier in that respect. And as DJW said, I doubt you can decide upon the type of car you will be driving for the rest of your life when you haven't even passed your test yet.
Possibly because the auto vs manual debate comes up far too often and always with a glut of ill informed opinions.

There's plenty of cheap old Jag XJ6's for sale. Thats what I smoke around in these days. Finding a car isnt a problem at all.
I'm enjoying my Jag so much I've put my MG up for sale.
0
reply
thatrollingstone
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#12
Report 10 years ago
#12
(Original post by JC.)
Cross that bridge when you come to it. How do you know for a fact you wont want to drive a tank? Better get a tracked vehicle licence at 18 then too by that logic!
Sorry but that logic is stupid. More than half the UKs cars are manual... if half the UKs vehicles were tanks then I guess I'd consider getting a tracked vehicle license...

In the end, there's absolutely no point going for the lesser option unless it's a significant hassle not to, which it really isn't. Learning to drive mainly comprises of being safe on the roads, taking a bit more time to learn manual is very much worth the privilege you get afterwards.

In the end JC, with all due respect, no one really gives a **** what you drive or what your plans are. OP, go by the common sense option and just learn manual, it will be worth it in the long run.
0
reply
JC.
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report 10 years ago
#13
Clearly sarcasm is lost on the stupid.
1
reply
thatrollingstone
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 10 years ago
#14
Obviously it was sarcasm, but you were still using it as a point in your argument. If you have better logical reasoning then by all means share, otherwise I'll just assume that the only argument you have is that she may not ever drive manual in the future - which is not convincing enough.
0
reply
DJW
Badges: 7
#15
Report 10 years ago
#15
(Original post by JC.)
Cross that bridge when you come to it. How do you know for a fact you wont want to drive a tank? Better get a tracked vehicle licence at 18 then too by that logic!
No, because that's a totally different license for a totally different class of vehicle.
For a car license you learn to drive a car on the road and learn to operate the vehicle, learning to operate a manual gearbox is a tiny part of the overall process.
Skipping that tiny part to save yourself a little bit of time and then having to repeat the whole learning and test procedure in the future is utterly pointless.

It doesn't matter if it's a sarcastic point, it's totally irrelevant to the argument.

(Original post by JC.)
There's plenty of cheap old Jag XJ6's for sale.
Come on JC, I've seen plenty of your posts. You're much more intelligent than this.
0
reply
JC.
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#16
Report 10 years ago
#16
(Original post by DJW)
Come on JC, I've seen plenty of your posts. You're much more intelligent than this.
I haven't got the inclination to argue with anyone tonight.
That said, I don't need patronising. Up until last month, there was two XJ's on my drive. Both were free. However, were I to buy them myself, i'd expect to have bought both with change from £500 for the pair.
If you want an auto, there's plenty about.
0
reply
EllieRSmith
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#17
Report 6 years ago
#17
Some people have to learn to drive automatic, stop being so judgemental about a person's choice of which they'd prefer. I have to learn to drive in automatic cars due to my right arm paralysis, is anyone going to tell me that I'm stupid and need to learn manual as well (just because they have...?) no, so why have a go at someone else? Gosh.
1
reply
345rty
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#18
Report 6 years ago
#18
(Original post by EllieRSmith)
Some people have to learn to drive automatic, stop being so judgemental about a person's choice of which they'd prefer. I have to learn to drive in automatic cars due to my right arm paralysis, is anyone going to tell me that I'm stupid and need to learn manual as well (just because they have...?) no, so why have a go at someone else? Gosh.
I'm sure he stopped being judgemental about that person's choice of gearbox four years ago. I'm not going to say you are stupid for having paralysis, but I am going to say you are stupid for thread necromancy...
0
reply
Sizzzla112
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#19
Report 6 years ago
#19
Took me three weeks from first lesson to test (mind you, I got lucky with a last minute cancellation slot else the test was three months away). Sod what people say about only being able to drive automatics... why's that a big deal? Trust me it's not. I've now been driving an auto since a week after I passed. Most cars and luxury cars are being made predominantly in auto so phuck the manual lovers and good luck x
0
reply
Lampoon
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#20
Report 6 years ago
#20
(Original post by JC.)
For goodness sake how many more times.
On the flip side, there's "very little point" in getting a manual licence if you only ever intend to own automatics.

I've driven manual cars for nearly 6 years now. I've just changed my daily driver to a Jag XJ6 auto and I doubt whether I'll ever own a manual car again. Admittedly my weekend toy is a manual, but I shall be changing that very soon anyway.

An automatic only licence isn't neccesarily a negative thing.
It can really limit you if you ever want to hire a car within the UK / Europe.

It also limits your choice of second hand cars (especially small hatchbacks).
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (290)
65.76%
No (151)
34.24%

Watched Threads

View All