V202 - The protection of DNA bill 2009 Watch

Poll: Should this Bill be passed into law?
As many are of the opinion, Aye (25)
73.53%
On the contrary, No (5)
14.71%
Abstain (4)
11.76%
This discussion is closed.
DayneD89
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#1
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#1
V202 - The protection of DNA bill 2009, Liberal Democrats

A bill to regulate the use of innocent citizens DNA by the police force.

BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-

1. The police database use of DNA samples.
(i)The police database will not keep DNA profiles of suspects found to be innocent or released without conviction.

(ii) The DNA profiles of citizens arrested but released without charge must also be deleted.

(iii) The DNA profiles of minors convicted of an offence who are released before the age of 18 and do not reoffend within three years must also be deleted.

(iv) The DNA profiles of Citizens who are only subjected to a caution must also be deleted after a period of 14 months.

(v) The DNA profiles of citizens who are sentenced to community service / rehabilitation or any other civil order may not be kept for a period of more than four years.

(vi) DNA profiles of citizens who are given a prison sentence, or suspended sentence, may be kept for a period of upto fourteen years, after release, dependant on the severity of the crime and the amount of time served. Guidlines as to the appropriate amount of time to hold DNA profiles shall be composed by the "Sentencing Advisory Panel" and shall be under periodic review. There are the following exceptions, for which data shall be kept permanently:
- sexual assualt
- those placed on the sex offenders register.
- murder
- Grievous bodily harm.

2. For the purposes of this Act-
(i) innocent refers to citizens who have not been convicted in relation to the act with which their DNA profile has been taken.

3. Enforcement and Punishment
(i) The enforcement of this Act should be the collective responsibility of the Home office and police forces in the respective territories.

(ii) Violation of this Act shall be subject to investigation by the independent police complaints commission.

4. Commencement, short title and extent

(i) This Act shall come into force at the end of the period of five months beginning with the day on which it is passed

(ii) This Act extends to England, Wales and Northern Ireland only.
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Cardozo
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#2
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I believe this is not strict enough especially with how weak the courts have become with sentencing.
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AnythingButChardonnay
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#3
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I'm very inclined to agree with Cardozo, which is a real shame.

I won't vote staight away, but I am, sadly, swaying towards "no".
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Eru Iluvatar
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#4
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Just for the record, this is under the coalition agreement, liberal bill on police powers (know you've already voted Cardozo, but anyway).

We've moved as far as we could really, without betraying our belief that at some point, we have to assume those who have previously committed crimes, and are convicted for it, are able to reform. I understand others opinions on this are different, but the time limits imposed with this bill i think are sufficient to balance the purpose of ensuring that those who reoffend, are caught more easily, and those who wont, aren't treated as criminals for the rest of their lives.
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AnythingButChardonnay
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#5
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(Original post by Eru Iluvatar)
Just for the record, this is under the coalition agreement, liberal bill on police powers (know you've already voted Cardozo, but anyway).
I was the one who said I wasn't voting straight away!

We've moved as far as we could really, without betraying our belief that at some point, we have to assume those who have previously committed crimes, and are convicted for it, are able to reform. I understand others opinions on this are different, but the time limits imposed with this bill i think are sufficient to balance the purpose of ensuring that those who reoffend, are caught more easily, and those who wont, aren't treated as criminals for the rest of their lives.
I don't want them treated as criminals in perpetuum either, but DNA of guilty people should be held for a reasonable length of time to identify repeat offending and punish the *******s who clearly have no respect at all (as they've repeated their crime) accordingly.

It looks as though the bill will pass, so I will just have to focus my efforts on toughening up deterrants and punishments for the scum!

Good bill by the way, well done. 49% of me loves it.
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Locke54
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#6
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#6
I'm going to have to vote alongside ABC for exactly the same reasons, deleting DNA before a reasonable amount of time has the potential of hampering police investigations and the course of justice, if you've been found guilty of a crime then you shouldn't have certain liberties such as provided for in this bill. That being said, it's going to pass anyways.
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Eru Iluvatar
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#7
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(Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
I was the one who said I wasn't voting straight away!



I don't want them treated as criminals in perpetuum either, but DNA of guilty people should be held for a reasonable length of time to identify repeat offending and punish the *******s who clearly have no respect at all (as they've repeated their crime) accordingly.

It looks as though the bill will pass, so I will just have to focus my efforts on toughening up deterrants and punishments for the scum!

Good bill by the way, well done. 49% of me loves it.
The first part was just a general note lol

But yeah, the encouraging thing is that even though, in the end we didn't quite get to agreement on the means, the aim was the same, to stop unneccessary government and police intrusion on those who don't warrant it, and try to work out a good balance for those who do, between public protection from criminals, and allowing those who have reformed to not be judged guilty for life.

Any bill you put forward in regards crime, sentencing, and rehabilitation with those same goals will be welcomed, and given serious consideration by the Lib Dems.
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DayneD89
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#8
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#8
The ayes have it! The ayes have it! Unlock!
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