English vs American math/science education Watch

Anick14
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So I found myself researching education around the world a bit and foud several links to articles and some random bloggers talking about how they learned maths in year 9 in England equivalent to those that American students studied senior year. That is kinda vague to me, so I'm asking you all to tell me about the maths you study during the last couple years of school. If you could break it down to subjects/concepts that would be great, because 'further maths' doesn't really mean anything to an American like me.


my curriculum at my school...

- 8th grade (right before high school)- Algebra I. just learning about quadratics/quadratic formula/their graphs, factoring/expanding, really simple algebraic things like that
- 9th grade/freshman year- Algebra II. I remember this more vividly: review of last year, radicals, conic sections, logarithms, lots of trigonometry, vectors, complex numbers, combinatorics/permutations, geometric/arithmetic series, and trig form/polar form.
- 10th/sophomore: geometry. i don't know what to say, it's geometry and i'm in the middle of it so i can't really sum it up yet
- 11th: pre-calculus. pretty much Algebra II but more in depth plus with derivatives at the end of the year
- 12th: calculus, what you learn depends on which level you're in (regular vs AP AB vs AP BC)

my school also has some APs like statistics or you can take multivariable calculus

I THINK in public schools it's pretty much the same, except maybe Algebra I starts in 9th grade for some people...

what is it like for english students? what years do you learn what material?
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1721
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1)its maths not math
that is all
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Oh I Really Don't Care
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Instead of saying your grade say your age - so we can actually tell you useful information.
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Burge
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If you take Maths and Further Maths you'll be doing this when you're 18

* Further Pure 1
o Summation of series
o Mathematical induction
o Roots of polynomial equations
o Complex numbers
o Matrices
* Further Pure 2
o Rational functions
o Polar coordinate system
o Hyperbolic functions
o Differentiation and integration of rational functions
o Taylor series
o Newton-Raphson method
* Further Pure 3
o Ordinary differential equations
o Linear differential equations
o Cross product
o Complex numbers in polar form
o De Moivre's formula
o Calculus with complex numbers
o Group theory

+ Mechanics and/or Statistics modules.
Which basically covers the mathematics behind all engineering and physics degress (1st year only), apparently.

You can't really compare them though, cause in America can't you get college credits if you do particularly well? So you're taking modules from the degree while you're at high school? If you're good at Math (I prefer to call it math plus, my girlfriend is American and made me )
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pocketfulofposy
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(Original post by DeanK22)
Instead of saying your grade say your age - so we can actually tell you useful information.
OK so I'm not the OP but:

8th grade - 13-14
9th grade - 14-15
10th grade - 15-16
11th grade - 16-17
12th grade - 17-18
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TI-84
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(Original post by Anick14)
So I found myself researching education around the world a bit and foud several links to articles and some random bloggers talking about how they learned maths in year 9 in England equivalent to those that American students studied senior year. That is kinda vague to me, so I'm asking you all to tell me about the maths you study during the last couple years of school. If you could break it down to subjects/concepts that would be great, because 'further maths' doesn't really mean anything to an American like me.


my curriculum at my school...

- 8th grade (right before high school)- Algebra I. just learning about quadratics/quadratic formula/their graphs, factoring/expanding, really simple algebraic things like that
- 9th grade/freshman year- Algebra II. I remember this more vividly: review of last year, radicals, conic sections, logarithms, lots of trigonometry, vectors, complex numbers, combinatorics/permutations, geometric/arithmetic series, and trig form/polar form.
- 10th/sophomore: geometry. i don't know what to say, it's geometry and i'm in the middle of it so i can't really sum it up yet
- 11th: pre-calculus. pretty much Algebra II but more in depth plus with derivatives at the end of the year
- 12th: calculus, what you learn depends on which level you're in (regular vs AP AB vs AP BC)

my school also has some APs like statistics or you can take multivariable calculus

I THINK in public schools it's pretty much the same, except maybe Algebra I starts in 9th grade for some people...

what is it like for english students? what years do you learn what material?
Hi Anick14.
You will get a lot of varied responses here, but I am a rarity in England in the sense that I have done A-levels & have also sat through the American system.
My subject choices were slightly different to yours, however, for the British students to answer you properly I will break down what you have said so it's easier for them to understand:

Aged 13: Algebra I: Basic Algebra such as Quadratic Formula's, possibly basic Simultaneous equations.
Aged 14: Algebra II: Radicals, Conic sections, Logarithms, Basic Probability & Trigonometry.
Aged 15: Geometry: I don't really remember Geometry very well, because I did this aged 14, and was a complete doss course.
Aged 16: Pre-calculus: More trigonometry, involving trig functions, basic differentiation, Complex Numbers, Vectors.
Aged 17: Calculus AB: Differentiaion, Integration, Applications of Calculus, Series (Maclaurin & Taylor).

As for your question.
I firmly believe that between the ages of 13 to 15 the American education system in terms of mathematics is ahead of the English system. GCSEs preparation is amazingly inadequate, and GCSE Mathematics itself is a complete joke. However, AS-level & A-level mathematics is on par with Pre-calculus & Calculus AB courses.
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TI-84
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(Original post by Burge)
If you take Maths and Further Maths you'll be doing this when you're 18


Which basically covers the mathematics behind all engineering and physics degress (1st year only), apparently.

You can't really compare them though, cause in America can't you get college credits if you do particularly well? So you're taking modules from the degree while you're at high school? If you're good at Math (I prefer to call it math plus, my girlfriend is American and made me )
He's asking about general mathematics that is taught at school(s). I believe he is enquiring as to the standard of the mathematics that is taught in the UK.
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Feral Beast
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I'd say that we're sort of a year ahead. We learn calculus and some other things a year before you do judging from that last and from what I remember.

France is further ahead even still, they learn calculus at 14 I believe.

EDIT: Scrap that, we weren't taught logarithms until Year 12 (Grade 11), your system seems totally different.
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thatone
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I didn't do logarithms until AS (junior year) and started basic algebra a year or so earlier than you. Other than that it looks similar.
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ish90an
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I did the following in the last 2 years at school:
Quadratic Equations with their Curves
Complex Numbers, including equations of circles and lines in Argand planes, polar form,
Trigonometry
Series and Sequences(Arithmetic, Geometric and Harmonic)
Binomial Theorm
Mathematical Induction
Set Theory
Vectors in 3D, equations of lines and planes, Cross and Dot Products and calculation of Area and Volume
Conics, equations of parabola, ellipse, hyperbola in polar and cartesian forms, tangents and normals to these curves
Permutation and Combinations, Bayes Theorm
Class 12:
Functions, Relations and Mappings
Limits of Functions
Differentiation of 2D rational functions, including Chain Rule
Integration of 2D rational functions, Definite and Indefinite Intergrals, Area and Volume of Curves
Matrices and Determinants, Eigenvectors and Eigenvalues(this was awfully hard to understand, probably the worst topic in maths in Class 12)
Differential Equations in 2D
Probability
Taylor series
Boolean Logic

From what I studied in Maths in Dundee, I had done all of the 1st year and around 50% of the 2nd year in school, and the bits I had not done were to do with Linear Algebra and some 3D calculus.
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Anick14
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sorry i got on so late for replies (and have to go soon so can't really quote/thank anyone), and i'm sure everyone's gone by now, but still: thanks all, now i've got a general idea. just a curiosity that came up while searching the net.
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Psyk
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Looks to me that they're on about the same level. Obviously they cover somewhat different topics, but overall it doesn't look particularly harder/easier than the UK system.
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